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Full text of "Minutes of the ... annual session of the Little River Baptist Association ..."



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

THE Z. SMITH REYNOLDS LIBRARY 




CALL NO. 




ACCESSION NO. 

6U35 



1921-1940 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/minutesofannuals2140litt 



V 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



Forty-Sixth Annual Session 



OF THE 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION, 



HELD WITH 



BAPTIST GROVE, BAPTIST CHURCH, 

OCTOBER 25, 26 and 27, 1921. 



J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator, Dunn, N. C. 

H. Y. SMITH, Vice-Moderator Broadway, N. C. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk-Treasurer Bule's Creek, N. C. 



Next session meets at Friendship Church, Bunnlevel, October 24, 7 : 00 
p. m,, 25 and 26, 1922. 



Introductory Sermon — B. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

Alternate, S. A. Edgerton Buie's Creek 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders, 

1921 



14 . 

MINUTES 



OK THK 



Forty-Sixth Annual Session 



OF THE 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION, 



HELD WITH 



BAPTIST GROVE, BAPTIST CHURCH, 

OCTOBER 25, 26 and 27, 1921. 



J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator, Dunn, N. C. 

H. y. SMITH, Vice-Moderator Broadway, N. C. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk-Treasurer Buie's Creek, N. C. 



Next session meets at Friendship Church, Bunnlevel, October 24, 7:00 
p. m., 25 and 26, 1922. 



Introductory Sermon — E. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

Alternate, S. A. Bdgerton Buie's Creek 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders, 

1921 



ifii4-js" 



Minutes of the 



1:15 P. M. — Devotional — Dr. W. Y. Quisenberry. 
1:45 P. M. — Woman's Work — Miss Mattie Bain, Rev. J. S. Farmer. 
2:15 P. M. — Obituaries— H. Y. Smith, J. R, Baggett. 
2:45 P. M. — Reports of Committees, locate time and place of next 
session, etc. 

On motion, the Association adjourns until to-morrow, Dr. Quisenberry 
pronouncing the benediction. 

Delegates and visitors enrolled as follows: 

Angier — J. L. Johnson, William Morgan, S. H. Broadwell, C. W. Flow- 
ers, Mrs. J. L. Johnson. — 5. 

Antioch — W. J. Brown, J. M. Patterson, A. A. Rogers, D. H. Nordon, 
N. A. S. McLean, Mrs. D. M. McLean, J. E. Davis, Miss Eivelyn Patter- 
son. — 8. 

Baptist G-rove— J. H. Rogers, J. W. Senter, W. D. Howell, W. C. Dowd, 
J. A. Gilbert.— 5. 

Baptist Chapel — By letter only. 

Bethel— J. C. Holder, B. L. Hamilton, P. A. Canaday.— 3. 

Buie's Creek — S. A. Edgerton, Willis E. Kivett, Horace Harmon, B. B, 
TJpchurch, E. M. Cain. — 5. 

Chalybeate Springs — H. H. Hamilton, D. H. Senter, C. K. Smith, W. 
F. Smith, G. D. Campbell— 5. 

Coats— Irbin Smith, A. R. Byrd, Mrs. T. D. Stewart, J. M. Byrd, Miss 
Mattie Bain^ Miss Myrtle Stewart, L. L. Levinson. O. R. Lynk. — 8. 

Cumberland Union — Mareus Weathers. J. S. Brown^ J. O. Weathers, 
T. B. Lanier — 4. 

Duke— W. B. Matthews, J. A. McKee, Mrs. J. H. McKee, A. H. Porter, 
Mrs. A. H. Porter. 

Dunn— L, F. Bailey, J. C. Clifford, Mrs. R. L. Denning, C. C. Warren, 
Mrs. Sam Broughton, Dr. C. D. Bain, Miss Cleta Naylor. — 7. 

Friendship — F. J. Bethune, J. W. Byrd, W. L. Byrd— 3. 

Holly Springs — M. C. Thomas, Pierce Patterson, H. Y. Smith, Early 
Thomas. — 4. 

Juniper Springs— H. M. Stroup, W. P. Steed^ W. M. Thomas, M. S. 
Bradley, Cary Bradley — 5. 

Kennebec— M. T. Oliver, L. J. Stephens, Walter E. Bond— 3. 

Lillington— Dr. J. W. Halford, A. M. Shaw, M. C. Wilder, B. P. Gentry, 
Mrs. B. P. Gentry, Mrs. J. W. Halford — 6. 

Macedonia— J. M. Holt — 1. 

Neill's Creek— Nathan Matthews, J. H. Morgan, Mrs. J. H. Morgan — 3 

Oak Grove — N. T. Reardon, Mrs. N. I. Reardon, H. L. Cutts — 3. 

Piny Grove— S. A. Powell, I. L Howell^ Mrs. I. L. Howell, W. H. 
Doanes — 4. 

Rawles— J. D. Betts— 1. 

S^vann's Station— H. W. Graham, L. G. Holt, D. A. Graham, C. W 
Lawmon. N. B. McNeill, B. C. Poole. — ^6. 

Ordained Ministers— J. A. Campbell, J. D. Betts, S. A. Edgerton, A. 
H. Porter, H. M. Strpup, W. C. Dowd— 6. 

Visiting Brethren — Rev. J. L. Martin, Rev. R. E. Atkins, Dr. W. T. 
Quisenberry, E. H. Ballentlne, Dr. J. H. Gorrell, Rev. R. E. Ingram^ F. 
B. Hamrick. 



Little River Baptist Association. 5^ 

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26—9:30 A. M. 

"Holy Spirit, Faithful Guide," is sung. Bro. J. C. Clifford leads in 
prayer. Dr. Quisenberry talked about "God's S'ilent Blessings," after 
which he delivered an address on Foreign Missions, 

Minutes of yesterday are read and approved. 

New delegates are enrolled. Visiting brethren invited and the fol- 
lowing responded: 

Rev. R. E. Atkins, Raleigh Association; Rev. J. L. Martin, Raleigh 
Association; Bro. F. B. Hamrick, representing Thomasville Orphanage; 
Dr. W. Y. Quisenberry, representing the Foreign Mission Board; Bro. 
E. H. Ballentine, Raleigh Association. 

Bro. C. W. Flowers read the report on the Orphanage. The report is 
discussed by Dr. J. W. Halford and Bro. F. B, Hamrick and^ on motion, 
the report is adopted. 

The report on Ministerial Relief is read, and, after discussion by 
Brethren H. Y. Smith, Dr. Quisenberry, S. A. Bdgerton and J. C. Clif- 
ford, on motion, the report is adopted. 

Bro. D. H. Senter announces that he will take subscriptions for the 
Recorder. On motion, the Association adjourns for dinner. Benedic- 
tion by J. A. Campbell, 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON. 

"Amazing Grace" is sung. Prayer by Rev. A. H. Porter. "How firm 
a foundation" is sung. 

Dr. W. Y. Quisenberry delivers an address on Foreign Missions, de- 
scribing girl life in China. 

Rev. A. H. Porter reads the report on Home Missions. After remarks 
by Bro. B. P. Gentry, the report is adopted. 

Bro. .J. M. Byrd makes a verbal report on Associational Missions and 
is permitted to file report with the Clerk. 

The subject is discussed by Brethren S. A. Edgerton, H. M. Stroup, 
A. H. Porter, Dr. C. D. Bain, J. A. Cam-pbell^ and L. L. Levinson. 

The Moderator appoints the following committees: 

On time, place and preachers for Union Meeting and Association — 
J. W. Byrd, C. W. Flowers, P. A. Canaday. 

On appointing Executive Board, Sunday S'c'hool Board and represen- 
tatives for State, Hom.e and Foreign Missions— D. PI. Senter, H. Y. 
Smith and W. J. Brown. 

On delegates to Southern Baptist Convention and State Convention — 
A. M. Shaw, S. A. Edgerton, and H. M. Stroup. 

On programme for Association and Union Meeting — J. A. Campbell, 
and pastor of respective churches where meetings are to be held. 

Bro. L. L. Levinson reads report on State Missions. The subject is 
discussed by Brethren C. C. Warren and F. B. Hamrick and is adopted. 

On motion, the Association adjourns, with benediction by Rev. J. Lr, 
Martin. 



Minutes of the 



WEDNESDAY P. M. 

Moderator Clifford in chair. The devotional exercises are conducted 
by Rev. H. M. Stroup. 

The report on Foreign Missions is read and, on motion, the report 
is adopted. There was no discussion because of having had several 
addresses on the subject during the session. 

Bro. D. H. Senter reads the report on the Biblical Recorder. On mo- 
tion to adopt, the report is discussed by Brethren D. H. S'enter, S. A. 
Edgerton, H. Y. Smith and Moderator Clifford. 

The report on Temperance is read and, after discussion by Brethren 
J. C. Clifford, H. M. Stroup, and P. A. Canaday, on motion, the report 
is adopted. Tiie benediction is pronounced by Bro. Edgerton and the 
Association adjourns until Thursday morning. 



THURSDAY MORNING. 

The congregation joins in singing "Trust and Obey," and "Ye must 
be born again." Moderator Clifford reads Hebrews 13 and leads in 
prayer. 

Minutes of yesterday are read and approved. 

The roll is called. 

The subject of Sunday Schools is discussed by Rev. H. M. Stroup, 
the report not being in hand. 

J. A. Campbell reads the report on Biuie's Creek Academy, Inc. The 
report is discussed by him and Moderator J. C. Clifford. 

The report on Education is not in hand, but the subject of Educa- 
tion is discussed by Dr. J. H. Gorrell, representing Wake Forest College. 

J. A. Campbell offers the following resolution which, upon motion, is 
unanimously adopted: 

Whereas, There is a tendency among some of our people to depart 
from the old established practices of our Baptist fathers, and, whereas, 
We believe such departure is harmful to the cause of Christ, therefore, 
Resolved, 

First, That the Little River Association, through its delegates as- 
sembled in session at Baptist Grove, reaffirm their loyalty to the funda- 
mentals held sacred by our Baptist forefathers; 

Second, That we urge our pastors and churches not to practice the 
unscrupulous observance of the Lord's Supper known as open com- 
munion ; 

Third, while recognizing the independence of Baptist churches to 
act for themselves upon all matters, we desire to discourage the prac- 
tice of receiving members from other denominations without baptism. 

On motion, the Association adjourns for dinner. Benediction by Rev. 
R. B. Ingram. 



THURSDAY AFTERNOON. 

Moderator Clifford leads the devotional exercises. 
^ The subject of W^oman's Work is taken up. Miss Mattie Bain, Vice- 
President of Woman's Work for this Association, reads the report and 
a paper prepared by Rev. .1. S. Farmer is read, followed by remarks by 
Mis® Mattie Bain and the Clerk, and the report is adopted. 



Little River Baptist Association. 7 

Bro. H. Y. Smith reads the report on Obituaries and, after remarks 
by him and J. A. Campbell, paying tributes to the Memory of several, 
especially Deacons N. T. Patterson and Geo. E. Byrd, on motion, the 
report is adopted. 

The committee to nominate delegates to Southern and State Conven- 
tions recommended that Rev. B. N. Johnson be appointed to Southern 
Baptist Convention, Dr. C. D. Bain, alternate, and B. M. Brewer, A. A. 
Rogers and A. P. Thomas delegates to the State Convention. 

The report is adopted. 

The committee to select time, place and preachers for Association 
and Union meeting rec:'ommend: 

For Association — Friendship church, October 24, 1922, 7:00 p. m., 
E. N. Johnson for preacher, with S. A. Edgerton alternate. 

For Union meeting — Oak Grove, January 28, 1922, 10:00 a. m., for 
first session, programme to be prepared by pastor J. D. Betts and Clerk 
of Association. 

The motion was amended to change the time of the meeting of the 
Association to begin on Thursday and extend through Sunday. 

The amendment being lost, the report of the committee was adopted. 

Moderator Clifford offers a resolution of thanks to the Baptist Grove 
church and community for their splendid hospitality in entertaining 
this session of the Association, with special thanks to the choir of this 
church and to Pastor Dowd in making this one of the best sessions of 
our Association. 

Remarks are made upon the fine spiritual feast of this session by J. 
A. Campbell, A. L. Baughcom, W. C. Dowd, Moderator Clifford and 
T. A. Gilbert. "Blest be the tie that binds" is sung in great spiritual 
fervor while audible sobs were evidences of unusual stirrings of the 
heart. J. A. Campbell led the closing prayer and the Association acl- 
iourns. 

J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk, 



Reports of Committees, Tables, &c. 



REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

For fifteen years some of the women in tlie Little River Association 
have been trying to show their love for missions by putting forth an 
earnest effort to enlist the women and children of the churches in the 
mission societies where they are trained for active church work. In 
1909 thirteen societies gave $542.33. in 1921 twenty-three societies gave 
$3,682.50. This growth has been great but w^hen we consider the num- 
ber of women and children in our churches and the pledge to the 75 
Million Campaign it is far from what it ought to be. 

The women are trying to take the children and so teach them through 
the Graded W. M. U. that when they are grown men and women they 
will be intelligent, faithful stewards for the Master. 

The Superintendent wrote 118 letters, 8 postals, traveled 334 miles 
visiting 12 societies', and organizing 4 societies the past year . The 
reports of the work done during the year showed growth along all lines. 

For the coming year we are asking the societies to strive a little 
harder to attain the Standard of Excellence, nothing new but some- 
thing that takes real work to bring it to pass. 

We wish to thank the pastors for their help in the past and ask that 
they continue to talk and preach missions, thereby helping us organize 
and keep alive one or more societies in every church in the Little River 
Association. MATTIE BAIN Committee. 

WOMAN'S WORK. 

This may well be designated as the Woman's Age. They are seen 
in every activity of the race, and, while not so constantly and loudly 
proclaimed, they have no where done more to prove their right to the 
honorable mention everywhere given them, than in their sacrifices for 
the cause of Christ. 

North Carolina Baptist women have from the beginning of their 
missionary endeavor, within the bounds of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, been in the very forefront. There are 2,100 societies among 
them in our State. 

During the year, which closed March 1, 1921, they raised $314,000.00. 
This is an increase of 80 per cent over the previous year. This is a 
year of depression, and for the first two quarters they found them- 
selves $30,000.00 behind the corresponding quarters for last year. But 
they are not alarmed, nor has the spirit of victory lagged; but on the 
contrary they are devoting themselves to the task with a spirit of sac- 
rifice, which means a complete victory. They have no doubt about 
raising their quota of $2,167,335.89 in the five years. 

They are devoting themselves enthusiastically to Mission Study 
Courses. Knowledge is power. They are seekers after light. To 
know and to do — to "do exploits" — is a part of their program. The 
Executive Committee is endeavoring to have one of their number at 
every Woman's Associational Meeting. These representatives, going all 
over the S'tate, bring words of encouragement. They are sure to win. 



Littler Rive Baptist Association 9 

"Help these women," is the admonition of this writer, and so help 
bring this splendid campaign to a successful close. 

Under an agreement with the Campaign Commission of the Southern 
Baptist Convention the Women's Missionary Siooieties may count all 
collections from the women and children of the churches. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. S. FARMER. 

REPORT ON OBITUARIES. 

Since the last session of our Association many useful members of 
our churches have passed over the river. Among them we recall Dea- 
con N. T. Patterson, of the Coats church. He was one of the strongest 
and most useful members of this church and his influence was felt for 
good throughout the Association. Deacon George E. Byrd, of the 
Friendship Church, another valuable man in our Association, has also 
passed away. Mrs. Kate Ballentine, mother of our former Moderator 
Bro. E. H. Ballentine, and Mrs. Casandria Powell, both of Piney Grove 
church and Mrs. Alice Langdon, of Coats, have left us for the glory 
land. Our church letters show that about 35 of our members have 
been called away by death, each leaving work that others of us must 
carry on to completion. H. Y. SMITH, Committee. 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

When we speak of intemperance it suggests to our mdnds the men- 
acing power of strong drink^ the menace that has been fought by the 
Christian people for generations. Today the nation has ruled against 
strong drink as a menace to the welfare of its citizens and has denied 
its taverns publicity. The enemy thus defeated has entrenched himself 
in the hills and lowlands of our communities, and seeks to enthrone 
himself by offering wealth to the lawless and bold. As a Christian peo 
pie and citizens of good society we should bestir ourselves to eradicate 
the lawless enemy from our community life. 

1. That we teach our boys the gravity of the evil and discipline them 
as soldiers in the fight against the moonshine evil that destroys home 
and lives: 

2. That we stand by the officers of the law and help them to enforce 
the law against the uncivil enemy; 

.3. That as Christians we watch, fight, pray and sow the seeds of 
truth until our community life shall bloom with beauty. 

Respectfully, 
JAS. A. BUCHANAN, Committee. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MIS'SIONS. 

'Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature,' 
\va^-- the command of our Savior to the disciples of Galilee. And after 
nineteen centuries that command still being in force, we will be held 
to account for failure to comply in as much as if it had been delivered 
to us in person. 

The Baptists of the Southern Baptist Convention have done a great 
work in Foreign Missions. We have missions in eighteen nations, 469 
missionaries, ^78 native workers, nine Theological schools, eleven Col- 



10 Minutes of the 

leges, twenty-five high schools, 587 schools of lower grades, twelve hosr 
pitals, in which 154,070 persons were treated during the past year. 

There are greater things for us to do since the World war. Places 
closed to us before are now opened. "The field is indeed white unto 
the harvest." An English merchant on his return to London from India 
and China was asked what difference, if any, did he see in the religion 
of India and China from the religion of Jesus Christ. "The same differ^ 
ence there is between the Anglo Saxon and the Mongolian" was bis 
answer. 

The greatest Missionary of all ages was the Apostle Paul. I shudder 
to think what the Caucasian race would be to-day if the vision he had 
on the shores of Asia Minor had said come over into China and India 
and help us. I verily believe England and America today would be aS 
China and India. Now in thankfulness to God for his goodness to us, 
we should endeavor to carry out his commission. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. M. SHAW, Committee. 

REPORT ON BIBLICAL RECORDER. 

The Recorder is the organ of the Baptist State Convention. It was 
founded in 1833 by Thomas Meredith and has stood for 88 years for the 
distinctive principles held by Baptists. It has also stood for what is 
best in the civil and religious life of the state. It is the duty of every 
Baptist to have it in his home. Its influence is wholesome and will 
help to counter balance the filth in literature that is plentiful and easily 
obtained and absorbed by young people and some older ones as well. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. H. SENTBR, Committee. ^ 

ASSOCIATIONAL REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The Home Mission Board is the only great inter-state missionary or- 
ganization of Southern Baptists. Its work is largely cooperative in 
connection with various State Mission agencies. It thus forms a bond 
of union and has probably been the greatest force among Southern 
Baptists for the unification of our denomination. 

Through this agency Southern Biaptists in the largest way make it 
possible for the strong to help the weak. The principle work of the 
Board is, therefore, in the weaker States of our Mississippi Valley and 
the Western States of our territory. Yet the changes in our industrial 
and business life, and in the cities and country-side of the older S'tatos 
are so great that increasing attention must be given to the needs in 
^he older sections. 

The problem in the cities of the South is growing acute in many 
places like Birmingham, St. Louis, New Orleans and Memphis. The 
Home Mission Board is helping to solve this problem and to meet the 
demands as rapidly as funds will justify. 

Evangelistic campaigns by the Evangelistic Department of the Hone 
Mission Board are proving to be a mighty factor in the evangelization 
of the cities. 

An op])Csite problem is presented ^'n the changing conditions or coun 



Little River Baptist Association. 11 

try life, where we must go with greater forces of men and money 
In the country lies the greatest numerical strength of Baptists and yet 
there is found our greate.^t weakness in point of efficiency. 

Through the missionary and enlistment forces of the Home Mission 
Board much is being done to conserve the vast host of country Bap- 
tists and to enlist them in our denominational work. 

The Board has just closed the most remarkable year of its history 
both in the amount of funds received and in the results accomplished 
as was shown in the Board's report to the Southern Baptist Convention 
in Chattanooga in May. 

At an annual meeting of the Board in June, 1920, the work was laid 
out on a basis of 100 per cent greater than that of any previous year. 
The calls were so numerous and compelling, fields so white unto har- 
vest, and the spirit of the brotherhood so optimistic in view of our 
great success in the 75-Million Camptiign, that the Eioard, by the urgent 
advice of the various State Mission Secretaries, was emboldened to pro- 
ject its work on a new and vastly enlarged scale. 

At that time cotton was forty cents a pound. The prices dropped so 
suddenly and drastically that during half the year cotton was onlj^ 
about ten cents. This brought a serious financial, situation with the 
Board. Heavy obligations had been assumed which could not be cast 
off. The Board retrenched Avhere it was possible, but in spite of this 
had to report a debt of $727,622. Consequently for the new year they 
have had to retrench very materially In order to take care of the in- 
debtedness as well as tlie current expense. 

The Board needs immediate help in order to maintain its credit at 
the banks, to meet the current expense, and lessen the burdensome 
debt. 

Let us conclude this report with a brief statement of results of the 
year's work which are truly inspiring: 

In the Evangelistic Department there were 15,567 baptisms, 22,689 
additions to the churches. Since the Department of Evangelism was 
organized in 1907 there have been baptized 124,103 converts, with a 
total of additions to the churches of 169,102 members; and 17,611 volun- 
teers for the ministry and mission work. A great record, indeed. 

Among the Foreigners, Indians and Negroes there were 2,157 bap- 
tisms and 3,208 additions to the churches; in Cuba and Panama 178 
additions to the churches, the contributions of the native churches 
$11,849. 

In co-operative Missions there were 25,532 baptisms, additions 50,307. 
We had eighty Enlistment workers who rendered 5,336 weeks of ser- 
vice; in our Sanatorium for the sufferers of the geat White Plague 
there were 298 patients treated and we have a property worth $4'00,000; 
in the work among the Soldiers and Seamen there were 3,331 profes- 
sions of faith and at our Seamen's Institute, Jacksonville, Florida, the 
boys from the seas wrote home 6,049 letters; in thirty-seven Mountain 
Schools 6,183 students, conversions 688 and we have property valued 
at $1,688,000; in Church Extension the Board aided 824 churches with 
loans of gifts and there were 1,084' others asking aid which could not be 
helped; in the Publicity Department the Board distributed 5,641,000 
tracts and sent forth thousands of copies of various books. 

The above sets forth briefly some of the inspiring accomplishments 



12 Minutes of the 

of our Home Mission Board and attests the efficiency of this great 
agency in helping to make the South Christian and Biaptistic and 
through it to bring the same blessing to the whole world. 

We recommend that earnest prayer be offered constantly for our 
great Home Mission work and that the churches immediately come to 
the help of the Board with contributions in order that the glorious work 
may be carried forward and the Board may soon be relieved from its 
budensome debt. Respectfully submitted, 

A. H. PORTER, Committee. 

MINISTERIAL RELIPJP REPORT. 

Among the many objects fostered and supported by our convention, 
perhaps, none are more worthy of the loyal support of all our people 
than Ministerial Relief. Our old ministers in most instances have 
given long lives of useful and heroic service to the building of the King- 
dom of God in our midst and the extension of that work to our further- 
est boundaries. 

Truly, in the accomplishment of these splendid results we may right- 
fully regard ourselves as a favored people. But we would, prove our- 
selves unworthy of such a heritage should. we fail to recognize that it 
was through our aged ministers that we have been blessed and as a 
result we owe them a debt of gratitude we can never repay. 

Your committee would, therefore, recommend that all of our churches 
be urged to take a Christmas offerings for this object and send it 
promptly to our Relief Board so that it may be used in meeting the 
needs of these old Soldiers of the Cross who have labored so faithfully 
and well. JAS. A. TAYLOR, Committee. 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

The per capita cost of maintaining a child at the Orphanage is $17.85 
the month. This includes salaries and the running expenses of the in 
stitution. There are 446 children at Thomasville and 85 at the Kennedy 
Home making 531 in all. In addition to these over 50 children are 
being aided in their homes with their mothers, the cost being about 
half the amount necessary to care for these in the Orphanage. 

For the first time in the history of the Orphanage we had the misfor- 
tune to lose one of the cottages this summer. This was the Simmons 
Nursery, built in 1889 and providing a home for from thirty to forty 
little boys. These children have been scattered among; the various 
cottages for the present, but this home is already being rebuilt and will 
lay a tax of at least $10,000.00 or $12,000.00 on the treasury. 

The general depression of business is felt at the Orphanage as it is 
everyv/here else. Many churches and S'unday s<^hools heretofore gen- 
erous supporters of the institution, are compelled to curtail their con- 
tributions on account of the financial stringency. They are holding up 
nobly so far, but it is simply a matter of impossibility for them to come 
up to the high standard of two or three years ago. 

Those whom the Lord has blessed with good seasons and crops are 
under obligation to help supply the deficiency of those who lack. That 
every church in this Association will do their best, we earnestly hope 

On or near Thanksgiving, the Orphanage has learned to depend upon 



Little River Baptist Association. 13 

our churches for a great offering. We would urge upon our people, 
especially our pastors and superintendents, the vital importance of 
holding a service at every church in the Association on that day, or 
on a S'unday near it. Such an outpouring as our churches made last 
year would set the Orphanage on solid ground. Our organized elapses 
are doing a fine service in their monthly collections. Let these he con 
tinued and increased. 

Your committee would recommend: 

1. The plan of setting apart for the Orphanage the income of one day 
near Thanksgivings day every man, woman and .child in our Associa 
tion. 

2. A monthly contribution from every Sunday School in our Asso- 
ciation. 

3. A club of Charity and Children in every Sunday school. 

C. W. FLOWE'RS, Committee, 

REPORT ON BUIE'S CREEK ACADEMY, INCORPORATED. 

As Principal of Buie's Creek Academy and Secretary to the Board of 
Trustees, we are happy to report a successful year of school for 1920-'21, 
having enrolled for the year 666 students, twenty-four of them Minis- 
terial students. We had fifty-four men last year at Wake Forest Col- 
lege and quite a number of young women at Meredith College. 

During this calendar year we have held two meetings, one conducted 
by Dr. J. J. Hurt, Wilmington, in April, with 15 for baptism, and the 
other conducted by Dr. W. F. Frazier, and Bro. A. E. Lynch, singer, 
both of the Home Board Staff, with 32 for baptism. 

During the fall term we have twenty-two young men who are prepar- 
ing to preach. 

At one of our services recently fifteen young men and young women 
expressed their willingness to go to the foreign field if God shall open 
the way for them to .go. Our spiritual life was never in better condi- 
tion. For several years Ave have led the State in number of Sunday 
S'chool awards, being surpassed in the entire South for the last two 
years by only one institution each year and that by a Theological Sem- 
inary. 

The institution is turning out yearly a large number of young men 
and young women to be more efficient teachers in Sunday Schools, 
leaders in B. Y. P. U. work, and helpers in every department of our 
Church life. 

We thank the Lord and our brethren and sisters for this chance to 
serve and beg for a continuation of your love and prayers. 

We recommend that brethren P. F. Pope, E. .H. Ballentine, C. H. 
Norris and J. G. Layton whose terms expire at this Association be 
elected to succeed themselves and that Bro. J. M. Byrd, Coats, be elect- 
ed to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Bro. N. T. Patterson, one 
of our best friends. J. A. CAMPBELL, Committee. 



14 Minutes of the 



REPORT ON HOME? MISSIONS. 

The Baptists of North Carolina are doing much towards making the 
^ate christian. From one end of the state to the other many are busy 
in loving service for the Master, and after all this is the life that really 
counts for God. They are going to the neglected places and establish- 
ing churches where none are found and aiding weak and struggling 
ones. Dr. Livingston Johnson, one of our much loved Secretaries, 
planned wisely much of this work. 

Our present Corresponding Secretary, Dr. Chas. E. Maddry, cohies 
to us filled with love for mJssions and if our people will all pull together 
in trying to carry out his plan, with the help of God, we will be able 
to accomplish much along all lines of our work, enlistment, evangelism 
and paying our 75-Million Campaign pledges being three of the greatest 
needs. 

Our faithful pastors, evangelists, women, B. Y. P. U's., and Sunday 
Schools have done great things for the Kingdom but there is a greater 
work to be done. 

As an Association may we give more of our time and money to State 
Missions. L. L. LEVINSON, Committee. 



FOR REPORTS FOR 1922. 

Baptist Literature — Dr. C. D. Bain, L. L. Levinson. 

Assoc'iational Missions — H. Y. Smith, J. M, Byrd. 

State Missions — D. H. Senter, J. R. Baggett. 

Home Missions — C. W. Flowers, E. N. Johnson. 

Foreign Missions — W. M. Thomas, H. M. Stroup. 

Education — B. P. Marshbanks, B. P. Gentry. 

Ministerial Relief— J. D. Betts, Dr. J. W. Halford. 

Orphanage — A. L. Baughcom, W. C. Dowd. 

Woman's Work — Miss Mattie Bain, S. A. Edgerton. 

Sunday Schools — L. H. Campbell, C. C. Warren. 

Temperance — A. M. Shaw, B. M. Shacklette. 

Buie's Creek Academy^ Inc.— J. A. Campbell, R. G. Taylor. 

Obituaries — J. W. Byrd, Volunteer discussion. 

Order of Business — J. A. Campbell and Friendship pastor. 



Little River Baptist Association. 15- 



REPORT OF TREASURER OF AS-SOCIATION— 1920. 

Received for Minutes $ 85.90^ 

Received for Convention objects 1466 . 84 

Total amount sent to Association , $1552 . 74 

Paid out Clerk and Minutes .,. . $ 85 . 90 

Paid Convention Treasurers 1466 . 84 

Total amount paid out $1552.74 

SENT TO ASSOCIATION. 

Minute Convention 

Churches. Fund. Objects. Total. 

Angler $5.00 $113.80 $118.80 

Antioch 4.00 4 . 00 

Baptist Chapel 1.00 1.00 

Baptist Grove 2.00 23.10 25.10 

Bethel 3.00 21.00 24.00 

Buie's Creek ; 5 . 00 653 . 68 658 . 68 

Chalybeate Springs 5.00 645.00 650.00 

Coats 5.00 5.00 

Cumberland Union . ., 3 . 00 3 . 00 

Duke 2.50 2.50 

Dunn 10.00 10.00 

Friendship 5.00 .5,00 

Holly Springs 4.15 126.35 130. .^0 

Juniper Springs 2 . 00 2 . 00 

Kennebec 2.00 39.45 41.i-5 

Lillington 5.00 116.29 121.29 

Macedonia 3.00 30.00 33.00 

Neill's Creek 4.00 77.11 81.11 

Oak Grove 3.00 18.19 21.19 

Piny Gfove 8.00 8.00 

Rawles 2.00 13.20 15.20 

Swann's Station 3 . 00 3 . Oa 



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Woman^s Missionary Union. 



The Little River W. M. U, held its fifteenth annual meeting with Ihc 
Lillington Baptist Church, September 8th, 1921. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8th. 

The meeting was called to order by our Superintendent, Miss MatUc 
Bain. Mrs. Walter Byrd being absent Mrs. J. D. Johnson conducted the 
devotional reading the 61st chapter of Isaiah. 

Miss Bain gave her report for the year which showed work and 
grov/th and urged that we do our best for the coming year. Mrs. S, A. 
Edgerton gave us some helpful suggestions on Fundamental Points in 
the Missionary Society. Special music by Miss Bridge added interest 
to our meeting. Mrs. Joel G. Layton gave some interr sting inforraalion 
on North Carolina's Part in Our Baptist W. M. U. Training S'chool m 
Louisville, Ky. The Lillington Sunbeam Band gave a demonstration 
program which was enjoyed by all and proved what can be done by 
real work. Following this program Miss Elizabeth N. Briggs — our State 
Sunbeam Leader — talked to the young people and their leaders about 
Mission Study and their work in general, showing dolls from China 
and Japan which pleased the children and held their attention v^7hile 
she told the story of the child life over there. 

The morning session was closed with prayer by Rev. S. A. Edgerton. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

The second session of the W. M. U. opened at two o'clock. Miss Foy 
O'Quinn conducting the devotional reading from the 90th Ps., and 
speaking briefly of "The Brevity of Human Life. Solo by Miss Corpen- 
ing. 

The reading of the reports of the societies was heard with much in- 
terest. ^ Then came the appealing message of Mrs. J. B. Tugwell on 
What Shall 1 Do About My Campaign Pledge, followed by special prayer 
for God's guidance in helping us meet our pledge by Miss Briggs. Tf 
every society would put into practice the suggestions for Personal Ser- 
vice given by Mrs. W. E. Nichols we v/ould have that point on our 
Standard of Excellence solved. Miss Briggs talked to us out of her 
heart about Mission Study, Every One Win One, Stewardship and the 
7o-Million Campaign in general. It is always a great joy and blessing 
to have Miss Briggs attend our Associational Meetings, she never fails 
to bring a message running over with love and devotion for our Mas- 
ter. Rev. S. A. Edgerton's presence and encouraging words were 
greatly appreciated. The time and place of next meeting, the first 
Thursday in September, 1922, with the Buie's Creek Church. No change 
was made in Superintendent, Secretary, and Sunbeam Leader, Mrs. 
B- F. McLeod was elected Y. W. A. Leader. 



22 Minutes Little River Baptist Association. 

After a rising vote of thanks to the Lillington women for their 
kind hospitality, the meeting adjourns to meet next vear at Buicj's 
Creek. MISS MATTIE BAIN, Superintendent. 

MISS FOY O'QUINN, Secretary. 

DELEGATES. 

Angier — Mrs. Willie Morgan, Misses Iva Johnson and Ada Overby. 
Antioch — Mrs. G. W. O'Quinn, Misses Zula Rogers and Lillie Patterson. 
Buie's Creek— Mrs. B. F. McLeod, Mrs. J. G. Layton, Mrs. F. B. Harmon. 
Coats — Mrs. Charlie Williams, Mrs. T. D. Stev/art. Miss Mary Stewa^'t. 
Dunn — Mrs. J. T. Guy, Mrs. R. M. Warren, Miss Eleanor Hatcher. 

Juniper Springs — Mrs. H. M. Thomas, Mrs. J. M. Primm, Mrs. J. C, 
Thomas. 
Lillington— Mrs. B. P. Gentry, Mrs. Jno. A. McLeod, Mrs. xUice McNeill. 



CONSTITUTION. 



Article I. This Association shall be composed of all the ordained min- 
isters in our Association, including ministers m ho are pastors of church 
es in our Association, and deleg"ates,not to exceed five from each church 
chosen by the several churches in our Union, best qualified in their 
judgment to represent in the Association, who, by producing letters 
from their respective churches, certifying their appointment or election., 
shall be entitled to a seat. 

Article 11. In the letter from the difiierent churches shall be the nuni- 
ber baptized, received by letter, restored, dismissed, excommunicated 
or dead sinc-:e the la>^t Association, also the total number of fellowship^ 
male and female, together with the contributions forwarded. 

Article ITI. The members thus chosen and convened shall have no 
power to lord it over God's heritage, nor shall they infringe upon any 
of the internal rights of any church belonging to this Union: but shall 
sit only as an advisory council. 

Article IV. The Association shall elect a Moderator, Vice-Moderator, 
Clerk and Treasurer annually by the votes of the members present. 

Article V. The Association shall have power to withdraw from any 
church in her Union Avho shall knowingly and wMllingly violate the Con 
^titution or depart from the orthodox principles of our religion. 

Article VI. We, the Churches of Jesus Christ, having been regularly 
baptized upon a profession of our faith in Jesus Christ, for the further- 
ance of the Gospel, agree to maintain and keep the orders and rules of 
our Association, according to the following form of government. 

Article ^T;I. Every church in this I^nion shall be entitled to represen- 
tation in the Association, with a privilege of two members from each 
church. 

Article VIII. All subjects and queries of debate before the body shall 
be read twice, if required, presented by the churches of this Union. 

Article IX. There shall be an Association fund raised by voluntary 
contribution, from the churches for the printing of minutes, and said 
contribution, when received, shall be paid over into the hands of the 
Treasurer of this body, who shall keep a just ynd true statement of the 
same, and pay them out according to the amount sent up by the sev- 
eral individual churches. 

Article X. The Moderator and Clerk of thii* Association, together 
with the Executive Board of the same, shall constitute a committee in 
whom shall be vested full authority for meeting any emergencies which 
may arise between sessions or to complete any pressing unfinished 
business of the Association. 

Article XI. Amendments to the above Constitution shall be made 
only by the concurrence of two-thirds of the members composing the 
Association present. 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



FORTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THE 



Little River Association 



HELD WITH 



FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 
OCTOBER 24, 25 and 26, 1922 



J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator Dunn, N. C. 

J. W. BYRD, Vice-Moderator Bunnlevel, N. C. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk-Treasurer, Bute's Creek, N. C. 



Next session meets at Swann's Station Church, Swann Station, 
October 30 (7:00 p.m.), 31, and November 1, 1923 



Introductory Sermon — A. C. McCall Duke, N. C. 

Alternate — .1. S. Farmer Raleigh, N. C. 



RALEIGH 

Bynum Printing Company 

1922 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 

J. D. Betts Fiuiuay Springs, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell Bute's Creek, N. C. 

W. C. Dowel Manchester, N. C. 

S. A. Edgerton Buie's Creek, X. C. 

E. X. Johnson Dunn, X. C. 

A. C. McCall Duke, X. C. 

S. C. Page R. F. D. 4. Ditnn. X. C. 

B. M. Shacklette Angler, X. C. 

H. M. Stroup Broadway, X\ C. 

B. Townsend Buie's Creek, X. C. 

J. E. Walker Swann's Station. X. C. 



NONRESIDENT PASTORS 

R. E. Atkins R. F. D., Raleigh, X. C. 

J. S. Farmer Raleigh, X. C. 

J. L. Martin Fuquay Springs. X'. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD 

L. H. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

L. Ij. Levinson.. Coats, N. C. 

B. P. Gentry Lillington, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD 

J. W. Byrd, J. M. Byrd, C. W. Flowers, C. W. Matthews, H. Y. 
Smith and ex officio J. C. Clifford and J. A. Campbell. 



ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

State Missions — S. A. Edgerton 
Home Missions — E. N. Johnson 
Foreign Missions — H. M. Stroup 



TRUSTEES BUIES CREEK ACADEMY, INCORPORATED 

Time Expiring 1923— J. C. Clifford, R. G. Taylor, G. F. Bope, J. W. 

Byrd. 
Time Expiring 1924— J. A. Campbell, Dr. J. F. McKoy, Z. T. Kivett, 

B. Townsend. 
Time Expiring 1925— Z. J. Womaek, J. A. Gates, B. P. Gentry, J. M. 

Byrd. 
Time Expiring 1926— P. F. Pope, E. H. Ballentine, C. H. Norris, 

J. G. Layton. 
Time Expiring 1927 — A. Parrish, B. P. Marshbanks, J. E. Lanier, 

Fred N. Day. 



Proceedings 



Friendship Church, 
BuNNLEVEL, K C, October 24, 1922. 

Tlie Little Kiver Baptist Association meets in its forty-seventh 
annual session as above stated, the first session being at seven 
o'clock p. ni. 

The devotional exercises are conducted by Rev. H. M. Stroup, 
the congregation singing, "Standing On the Promises," "The 
Touch of His Hand on Mine." Prayer by Brother J. W. Byrd. 
Song, "All Hail the Power of Jesus' JSTame." The annual 
sermon is preached by Rev. E. ISF. Johnson, pastor of Dunn 
Church, taking for a text, "That I May Apprehend that for 
which I am Apprehended of Christ Jesus." 

Prayer by J. A. Campbell. After singing, "Jesus Calls Us," 
fDrnier Moderator J. C. Clifford calls the Association to order, 
J. A. Campbell acting as clerk. 

Delegates from the churches are enrolled and the Moderator 
announces the election of officers to be next in order, resulting 
in the unanimous election of J. C. Clifford, Moderator; J. W. 
Byrd, Vice-Moderator; J. A. Campbell, Clerk-Treasurer. The 
Committee on Order of Business reports as follows : 

PROGRAMME 

October 24 

7:00 P. M. — Prayer and Song Service Rev. H. M. Strouji 

7 :30 P. M. — Annual Sermon Rev. E. N. Jolmsoii 

After sermon, enrollment of delegates and election of 
officers for ensuing year. 



October 2; 



9:30 A. M.— Devotional .J. F. Blackmon 

10 :00 A. M.— Temperance A. M. Shaw, B. M. Shackiette 

10:30 A. M.— Orphanage A. L. Baughcom, W. C. Dowd 

11:15 A. M.— Aged Ministers J. D. Betts, Dr. J. W. Halford 



6 Minutes of the 

Dinner 

1 ;15 P. M. — Devotional Rev. S. A. Edgerton 

1:45 P. M. — Associational Missions H. Y. Smitli, J. M. Byrd 

2:30 P. M.— State Missions D. H. Senter, J. R. Raggett 

3:15 P. M. — Home Missions C. W. Flowers, E. N. Johnson 

7:00 P. M.— Devotional J. C. Clifford 

7:30 P. M. — Foreign Missions W. M. Thomas, H. M. Stroup 

8:15 P. M.— Baptist Papers.. Dr. C. D. Bain, L. L. Levinson 

October 26 

9:30 A. M.— Devotional Rev. A. C. McCall 

10:00 A. M.— Sunday-schools L. H. Campbell, W. M. Jernigan 

10:30 A. M.— Education B. P. Marshbanks, B. P. Gentry 

11 :15 A. M. — Buie's Creek Academy, Inc J. A. Campbell, R. G. 

Taylor. 

Dinner 

1:15 P. M.— Devotional .' J. C. Clifford 

1 :45 P. M. — Woman's Work, Miss Mattie Bain, Rev. S. A. Edgerton 
2:15 P. M. — Obituaries J. W. Byrd, Volunteer discussion 

2 :45 P. M. — Report of Committees, locate time and place of next 

Association, next Union Meeting, etc. 
The first person on each subject is expected to write the report, 
the second is to open the discussion. 

The report is adopted. Brother J. W. Byrd and Pastor Mc- 
Call spoke words of welcome and on motion the Association 
adjourns. Benediction hy Brother Stroup. 

ENROLLMENT OF DELEGATES AND REPRESENTATIVES 

Augier — C. W. Flowers, William Morgan, A. J. Smith. 

Antioch — W. J. Brown, J. E. Davis, W. J. Patterson, Z. .T. Womack, 

David Rogers. 
Baptist Chapel — J. R. Thomas. 
Baptist Grove— W. B. Jones, .1. A. Gilbert, E. R. Gilbert, B. Dean, 

Mrs. Maggie Jones. 
Bethel— L. C. Dowd, Miss Eva Canady, Mrs. Ateline Dowd, G. D. 

West, P. A. Canaday, W. C. Dowd, Miss Ora Elmore, Miss Flossie 

West, Malcolm Parker. 
Buie's Creek — J. F. Blackmon, J. R, Blackmon, Mrs. J. R. Blackmon, 

S. A. Edgerton, Z. T. Kivett, Willis Kivett, J. A. Campbell. 
Chalybeate Springs— W. T. Smith, C. K. Smith, W. J. Norris, G. R. 

Wells, Mrs. G. R. Wells. 
Coats — J. M, Byrd, L. L. Levinson, Irbin Smith, A. D. Williams, 

Mrs. Bettie Williams, J. H. Parrish, C. T. Matthews, Miss Mattie 

Bain. 



Little River Baptist Association 7 

Cumberland Union— T. B. Lanier, W. F. Lanier, J. W. Brown, Jesse 

Weathers, 
Duke— A. C. MeCall, M. C. Brown, C. J. Turlington, W. C. Stone. 

A. W. Byrd. 
Dunn, First— C. D. Bain, E. M. Slaughter, F. N. Johnson, J. C. 

Clifford, Jas. A. Taylor, M. M. Jernigan, G. T. Noel. 
Friendship— W. L. Byrd, J. W. Byrd, C. L. Avery, F. D. Byrd, A. A. 

Bethune, L. E. Byrd. 
Holly Springs — J. A. Patterson, Pina Patterson. 
Juniper Springs— W. M. Thomas, H. M. Stroup, G. D. Manning. 
Kennebec— M. T. Olive, Mrs. Maggie Olive, Miss Pauline Olive, Miss 

Neba Olive. 
Lillington— J. R. Baggett, A. M. Shaw, Dr. J. W. Halford, Henderson 

Steele, B. P. Gentry, Mrs. J. W. Halford, Mrs. J. D. Johnson, 

Miss Mame Camp. 
Macedonia — Letter only. 
Neil's Creek — D. J. McLeod, Mrs. D. J. McLeod. J. H. Morgan, Mi's. 

J. H. Morgan, J. F. Jones. 
Oak Grove — B. C. Hockaday, Miss China Hockaday, Miss Lena 

Hockaday, Miss Minnie Hockaday. 
Piney Grove— I. L. Howell, Mrs. I. L. Howell, Y. A. Betts, H. O. 

.Austin, G. T. Watkins, Frank Gilliam, Miss Vida Betts. 
Rawles— J. D. Betts, Mrs. Lettie Betts, Willie Betts. 
Swann's Station — J. G. Spivey, L. G. Holt, George Graham, M. 

Godfrey. 

It is announced that Central Churcli, Apex, and South Dunn^ 
Dunn, have disbanded and their names are dropped from our 
list of churches. 



wed:^esday SESSION" 

October 25. 

The devotional exercises are conducted by Brother J. F. 
Blackmon, who read part of second chapter of Luke, com- 
menting especially on the seventh verse. 

Visiting brethren are invited. Rev. W. M. Gilmore, repre- 
senting the Reinforcement Campaign, Brother A. L. Byrd 
from the Mecklenburg-Cabarrus Association, and Brother F. S. 
Cullom from the Sandy Creek Association report and are wel- 
come. 

Minutes of yesterday are read and approved. Brother M. M. 
Jernigan discussed the subject of Sunday-schools, the report 
to be sent in later. 
3 



8 Minutes of the 

The report on Temperance is read by Brother A. M. Shaw 
and, after discussion by brethren J. A. Campbell, P. A. Cana- 
day and J, C. Clifford, the report is adopted. A motion is 
made requesting Brother Clifford to furnish the county papers 
the talk made before this body. 

Eev. J. D. Betts read the report on Aged Ministers. The 
report is discussed by Dr. J. W. Halford and Eev. W. M. 
Gilmore, and the report is adopted. 

The Association adopted a resolution recommending that all 
pastors shall take out a policy Avith the Annuity Board of our 
Southern Baptist Convention and recommend further that 
churches place the premium for such security in the budget of 
their expenses. 

The Moderator appoints brethren J. A. Taylor, A. M. Shaw 
and T. B. Lanier a committee on time, place and preacher for 
next Association and next Union Meeting. Benediction is 
pronounced by Rev. W. M. Gilmore and, on motion, the Asso- 
ciation adjourns one hour for dinner. 

WEDIs^ESDAY AFTERJSrOOlNr 

The devotional exercises are conducted by Bev. S. A. Edger- 

ton. Prayer by Brother J. A. Taylor. 

Brother D. H. Senter reads the report on State Missions, 

Brother C. W. Flowers the rei3ort on Home Missions and Rev. 

S. A. Edgerton the report on Associational Missions. Brother 

.J. M. Byrd discusses the report on Associational Missions, 

Brother J. R. Baggett discusses State Missions and Rev. E. IN'. 

Johnson discusses Home Missions. 

Rev. W. M. Gilmore delivers an address on the 75 Million 

Campaign- 
On motion, the Association adjourns until the night session. 

Benediction by Rev. E. JN". Johnson. 

WEDI^ESDAY OTGHT SESSIOl^T 

The devotional exercises are conducted by Rev. A. C. McCall, 
reading the fifteenth chapter of John. Prayer by Rev. H. M. 
Stroup. 



Little River Baptist Association 9 

Brother W. M. Thomas reads the report on Foreign Missions. 
The report is discussed by Rev. H. M. Stroup. 

The report on Baptist Literature is read by Dr. C. D. Bain. 
The report is discussed by brethren J. C. Clifford, J. A. Camp- 
bell and J. M. Byrd and is adopted. On motion, the Associa- 
tion adjourns until tomorrow morning. 



THURSDAY 

October 2Q. 

Rev. A. 0. McCall conducts the devotional exercises, com- 
menting on the Scripture, ^'Every man that hath this hope in 
himself purifieth himself, even as he is pure." Minutes of 
yesterday are read and approved. Visitors are invited. Presi- 
dent W. L. Poteat of Wake Forest College, Brother F. B. 
Hamrick of the Orphanage, and Brother E. H. Ballentine of 
the Raleigh Association, report and are welcomed. 

The report on the Orphanage is read, and, on motion to 
adopt, the report is discussed by Dr. Poteat and Brother Ham- 
rick. 

The report of Buie's Creek Academy, Incorporated, is read 
by J. A. CampbelJ and, on motion to adopt, Brother R. G. 
Taylor discusses the report. 

President Poteat delivers an address on our Baptist institu- 
tions of learning. 

Rev. E. ^N". Johnson pronounces the benediction and the Asso- 
ciation adjourns for dinner. 

THURSDAY AFTER:^^OOI^ 

Rev. E. N. Johnson conducts the devotional exercises. Miss 
Mattie Bain reads the report on Woman's Work. After dis- 
cussion by Rev. S. A. Edgerton, on motion, the report is 
adopted. 

Brother J. W. Byrd reads the report on Obituaries. The re- 
port is discussed by brethren J. W. Byrd and J. A. Campbell. 

The committee on time, place and preachers for next session 
report and the report is adopted. 



10 Minutes of the 

On motion, Rev. S. A. Edgerton is appointed to prepare pro- 
gramme for the Union Meeting and J. A. Campbell and J. C. 
Clifford the programme for the Association. 

The report of the treasurer for the Association is read and 
is ordered to be printed. 

Brother J. C. Clifford reads a resolution of thanks for the 
gift of a library building for Buie's Creek Academy. It is 
adopted with great enthusiasm and appreciation. 

On motion, J. W. Byrd J. M. Byrd, C. W. Flowers, C. W. 
Matthews and H. Y. Smith are re-elected for the Executive 
Board, the motion being amended to include the Moderator and 
clerk of the Association. 

On motion, L. H. Campbell, L. L. Levinson and B. P. Gentry 
are elected to constitute the Sunday-school board for the ensuing 
year. 

On motion of Rev. E. N". Johnson, the Association appoints 
a committee of five to make a survey of the Association, its 
needs and opportunities and report at the next session of the 
Association. The Committee of Survey is : E. JST. Johnson, 
J. A. Campbell, S. A. Edgerton, B. P. Gentry and H. M. 
Stroup. 

Delegates to the State Convention are: J. C. Clifford, T. B. 
Lanier and C. W. Flowers. 

Delegates to the Southern Baptist Convention are appointed : 
E. JN^. Johnson, with J. A. Campbell, alternate. 

The following representatives are appointed : State Missions, 
S. A. Edgerton; Home Missions, E. ^. Johnson; Foreign Mis- 
sions, H. M. Stroup. 

The clerk is instructed to add for next Association a report 
on B. Y. P. U. work. 

A resolution of thanks is adopted for the Friendship Baptist 
Church and community for their bounteous hospitality in enter- 
taining this session of the Association. 

There being no other business, on motion, the Association 
adjourns to meet at Swann's Station, October 30, 1923. 

'^Blest be the tie that binds," was sung and the benediction 
was pronounced. 

J. C. Cliffoed, Moderator. 

J. A. Campbell, Cleric. 



- Little River Baptist Association 11 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES, TABLES, ETC. 



REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

111 carrying out the great injunction, "teaching them to observe all 
things whatsoever I liave commanded you," the Sunday school has 
been the church's most efficient agency. In theory, if not in practice, 
the Sunday school is the church membership organized for regular, 
systematic study of the Bible. When the church shall come to its 
first love, "seeking first the Kingdom of God," church membership 
will be equivalent to membership in the Sunday school. 

Statistics can reveal only partially the service rendered the cause 
of Christ by the Sunday schools in our Association. In 1921 this 
Association was composed of 22 Baptist churches with a membership 
of 4,955. These churches enrolled 4,095 in their Sunday schools dur- 
ing this year, only 2,059 of whom were church members. The cost of 
maintaining these schools for 1921 was $2,174.61, the most of which 
amount was paid by the schools themselves. In addition to this 
amount for its Own support, the Sunday schools contributed last year 
for Convention objects and charity $1,629.40. That the Sunday 
schools have not neglected their work of evangelism is indicated by 
the fact that 311 of the 415 baptisms in our Association last year 
were from the Sunday schools. 

These figures speak eloquently of our achievements. But they 
reveal a great opportunity. Less than half of our church members 
are identified with our educational program. The enlistment of the 
larger half of our unconcerned, dead church membership is an objec- 
tive that should challenge our best efforts. The salvation of the large 
numbers in our Sunday schools is another opportunity for doing mis- 
sion work, beginning at home. Furthermore, the enrollment of the 
great majority of men, women and children in every community that 
attend no Sunday school presents a program of service that is equal 
to our greatest aspirations. 

L. H. Campbell, Committee. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TIME AND PLACE 

Your committee recommends as follows: 

Association to meet with Swann's Station Church, Tuesday night 
after the fourth Sunday in Octcber, 1923. 

Annual sermon to be preached by Bro. A. C. McCall, Duke. 
Next union meeeting to be at Lillington Baptist Church, Saturday 
before the fifth Sunday in December. 

Sermon on Saturday to be preached by Bro. E. N. Johnson, Dunn. 
Sermon on Sunday by Bro. B. Townsend, Buie's Creek. 

James A. Taylok, 
A. M. Shaw, 
T. B. Lanier, 

Committee. 



12 Minutes of the 



REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

The State Mission endeavor has been the backbone of our denomi- 
national growth and development in North Carolina. For long years 
the work done by our State Mission Board was confined to mis- 
sionary endeavor, but for the last few years has been added that of 
evangelism and enlistment, which at this time is just as important. 
The work being done by our State Mission Board is such that calls 
for the cooperation and support of every Baptist in the State. 
Respectfully submitted, 

D. H, Senter, Committee. 



REPORT ON TEMPERANCE 

If, under the blessing of God, the temperance forces of the United 
States should succeed in making this great country of ours free from 
the blight and curse of alcohol, it will make our nation the leader 
and guide for all the world. 

The plain duty of Christians, in view of the present situation in 
regard to prohibition and its enforcement, is to have reverence for 
the law ; for one who willfully breaks the law^ is not far removed 
from an anarchist. We, as Christian people, as the election draws 
near, should resolve that we will support no man for office, State or 
county, that will not enforce the prohibition law. If we work up 
sentiment strong enough, there will be no still in Harnett County 
nor retailer to handle illicit liquor. Our officers will be compelled to 
hail them before the court ; and lawTers, by the tricks of their trade, 
cannot get them off for a nominal fine. They will be put to maintain- 
ing our systems of highways you are hearing so much about at this 
time. 

The fight for prohibition has been long and bitter. We have had 
no open saloon in our county for twenty-five years, and many of our 
young people know nothing about an open bar room. I can well re- 
member, in our county-seat, when we had local option. It was not 
safe for ladies to go out on the streets, on account of the fights and 
brawls. Murder was committed and the blood of one of the victims 
was splashed on our courthouse. Liquor is no longer legally sold, but 
is in the hands of sorry negroes and worse white men. 

I, for one, can testify that prohibition has made wonderful im- 
provement. We have the greatest nation in all the world. We have 
more Christian people in America, to its population, than there is in 
all the world. In spite of the whiskey forces, we have more sober 
people in America than anywhere else in the world. The contrast 
between America and the rest of the world is the contrast between 
a sober man and a drunkard. 



Little River Baptist Association 13 

In closing I will say prohibition is a success and is going to be 
more so ; for the strong arm of the law will be made to reach out 
and take hold of every one that makes or sells whiskey, and place 
him where he will labor for his country's good, in the convict camps 
of the State highways. A. M. Shaw. Committee. 



REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

As will be learned from the annual report of the Home Mission 
Board, made to the Southern Baptist Convention at Jacksonville last 
May, the Board presented a record of wonderful achievements. The 
previous year had been the greatest in all the history of the Board; 
and though there was retrenchment in the force of workers, the past 
year, in results, was even greater. 

The million-dollar mark was reached in the Church Building Loan 
Fund, which is loaned to churches in the erection of church buildings. 
It was the greatest year in soul-saving and in the enlistment of our 
forces in the work of the Kingdom, in advancement towards self- 
support in so many of our friends, all of which conspired to render 
the year memorable in our history. 

Sometimes statistics are tiresome and uninteresting, but such as 
the following ought to cause thanksgiving to God on our part, and 
resolutions to make it possible for even greater results through the 
labors of our Home Mission Board : 

There were last year under the employment of the Board, inde- 
pendent and cooperative workers, a total of 1,188 missionaries, who 
supplied 3,131 churches and missions, delivered 165,445 sermons, and 
addresses, made 236,892 religious visits, baptized 36,164 converts, 
received 83,994 additions to the churche's, organized 308 churches, 
built or improved 456 houses of worship, organized 786 Sunday 
schools, and did a vast work in personal visitation among the sick, 
and distributed millions of pages of tracts and thousands of copies 
of the Scriptures. 

What a mighty work is being accomplished through this great 
agency of Southern Baptists, the Home Mission Board ! Surely the 
Lord of Hosts is with us, making bare His mighty arm in the salva- 
tion of the lost. 

The Board's work is done under the following departments: Co- 
operative Missions, Enlistment, Evangelism, Mountain Schools, For- 
eigners, Indians and Negroes, Cuba, Panama, Soldiers and Seamen. 
Publicity, Southern Baptist Sanatorium, Church Extension. 

In every department of the work there has been splendid progress, 
especially on the lines of Evangelism and Enlistment, which two 
departments have recently been more closely coordinated and are 
working hand-in-hand for the salvation of the lost and the develop- 
ment of the saved. 

The Board for two years has been heavily in debt, because of the 
enlargement of the work at the beginning of the 75 Million Campaign 



14 Minutes of the 

and a great falling off in receipts during the past year. This has 
made it necessary for retrenchment wherever possible, and has at the 
same time made it impossible for the Board to respond to numerous 
and pressing calls for help. 

Financial conditions are improving, and the Board is encouraged 

to believe that its receipts will be in advance of those for last year, 

and thus make it possible to lessen the Board's debt and turn our 

forces towards the larger opportunities that are found on every hand. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. W. Flowers, Committee. 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

As I look at the many objects which we give to, I think there is 
none more worthy than that of our old ministers' relief. I feel like 
they had a harder time than our ministers have today, because their 
way of traveling was not like it is today ; also many of them re- 
ceived very little pay for their preaching. Therefore, I think that 
we should always look after their needs. They worked hard, were 
faithful to God, loved the work, and were steadfast to the end. 

J. D. Betts, Co7nmiltee. 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK 

Again we have come to our annual meeting to recount the blessings 
of the past, mingle together in Christian fellowship, and plan for the 
future. When we begin naming the many blessings of tlie year, we 
find that we only have time and space for a few of them. The super- 
intendent considers it one. of tlie greatest joys and blessings of the 
year that she was permitted to travel 600 miles visiting, organizing, 
and encouraging our women and children in their mission work. 
Some societies seemed to find tlie work hard, so became discouraged 
and gave up, while others have been enlisted — six for the year. 

In finances we fell a little behind the previous year, but the inter- 
est shown in other lines of work has been greater than usual. The 
twenty-five mission-study classes conducted have already been felt 
and proven a great blessing to our societies. The six weeks Miss 
Sigmon was with us greatly helped our mission study, and her con- 
secration was an inspiration to those who came in contact with her 
work. Thanks to our State Mission Board for planning and sending 
out these workers. 

Many letters were written but there is nothing that enlists, en- 
lightens, and develops the work as much as the personal touch. 
All societies able to stand the test of our Standard of Excellence — 
let this be our aim. 

May the accomplishments of the past give added interest and re- 
newed vigor for the tasks that lie before us. 

Mattie Bain, Committee. 



Little River Baptist Association 15 



REPORTS FOR 1923 

Baptist Literature — J. A. Buclianan, J. D. Betts. 
Associational Missions — C. W. Flowers, W. C. Dowd. 
State Missioiis~R. G. Taylor, H. M. Stroup. 
Home Missions— W. M. Thomas, J. C. Clifford. 
Foreign Missions — A. E. Lynch, B. P. Gentry. 
Education — L. H. Campbell, E. N. Johnson. 
Aged Ministers — J. W. Byrd, H. Y. Smith. 
Orphanage — Miss Mattie Bain, B. M. Shacklette. 
Woman's Work— Mrs. J. G. Lay ton, Dr. J. W. Halford. 
Sunday-schools — L. L. Levinson, J. R. Baggett. 
Temperance — B. P. Marshbaiiks, D. H. Senter. 
Buie's Creek Academy — J. A. Campbell, S. A. Edgerton. 
Obituaries — A. M. Shaw, General Discussion. 
B. Y. P. U.— C. T. Matthews, A. C. McCall. 
Order of Business — J. A. Campbell, J. C. Clifford. 
The first name is to write the report and the second is to open 
the discussion. 

REPORT OF TREASURER OF ASSOCIATION FOR 1921 

Received from churches for minutes $ 80.65 

Received from churches for Convention objects ; 1,768.37 

Total amount received $1,814.02 

Paid out for minutes and clerk $ 80.65 

Peid treasurer of Convention 1,763.37 

Total amount paid out $1,814.02 

Respectfully, 

J. A. Campbp:ll, Treasurer. 

SENT TO ASSOCIATION 

Minute Convention 

Fund Objects Total 

Angier .$ 5.00 $ 40.00 $ 45.00 

Antioch 5.00 5.00 



Baptist Chapel 

Baptist Grove 

Bethel 

Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs 

Coats 

Cumberland Union 



2.00 


34.42 


36.42 


2.00 . 


2.10 


4.10 


5.0O 


500.00 


505.00 


5.00 . 




5.00 


5.00 . 




5.00 


3.00 


21.25 


24.25 



16 Minutes of the 

Minute Convention 
Fund Objects Total 

Duke $ 2.50 $ $ 2.50 

Dunn 

Friendship 

Holly Springs 

Juniper Springs 

Kennebec 

Lillington 

Luart Sunday-school 

Macedonia 

Neill's Creek 

Oak Grove 

Piney Grove 

Rawles 

Swann's Station 



10.00 . 




10.00 


5.00 . 




5.00 


5.05 . 




5.05 


3 00 . 




3.00 


2.50 


10.80 


13.30 


5.00 . 




5.00 




3.60 


3.60 


8.00 


22.75 


25.75 


5.00 


105.80 


110.80 


3.50 


18.69 


22.19 


8.00 . 




8.00 




22.00 


22.00 


3.00 . 




3.00 



Total ^ 87.55 .$ 781.41 $ 868.90 

J. A. Campbell, Treasurer. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST PAPERS 

In our county, I'm told that our Baptist df nomiration is far 
ahead in numbers. Therefore, to us belongs the greatest and best 
service rendered to our God in our county and Association. 

In order to be able to render this kind of service, our Baptist 
people must fall in line and keep step with all forward move- 
ments fostered by our Baptist denomination. To know what our 
Baptist people are fostering, we must have one or two Baptist 
papers coming regularly into our homes and by reading them 
carefully, we are kept in touch with what our people are doing, 
not only in our Association but in our State and Southern Baptist 
Convention as w^ell. 

The Biblical Recorder and Charity and Children are published 
within our own State and should be in every Baptist home in the 
Little River Association. 

The Home and Foreign Fields and the great number of books 
written by our own Baptist ministers, with the enormous amount 
of Baptist literature published and sent out from our Sunday-school 
Board at Nashville, Tennessee, should be read and re-read, and 
passed on to our neighbors to be read again, until we, shall all 
become one great army of well trained and well educated soldiers 
of our Lord and Saviour. Jesus Christ. 

C. D. Bain. Committee. 



Little River Baptist Association 17 



ORPHANAGE 

"Pure religion and undefiled before God and tlie Father is this, 
To visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and to keep 
himself unspotted from the world." The very essence, then, of 
the Christian religion is to care for the orphan child. That church 
or individual that turns a deaf ear to the cry of such child is 
lacking in the fundamental principles and spirit of Christianity. 

Prompted by the Spirit of Christ, our Baptist fathers founded 
an orphanage at Thomasville, North Carolina, November 15, 1885. 
Since that time this orphanage has taken care of and trained 
for useful citizenship 2,135 orphan children. Many of these have 
become leaders in the different walks of life. 

At present there are at the Thomasville Orphanage 453 children, 
and at the Kennedy Home, 98, making a total of 551 that our 
Baptist people in this State are taking care of. The cost of main- 
taining each child is sixty-three and three-fourths cents per day, or 
$19.40 per month, or $232.70 per year. The daily cost at the orphan- 
age of the 551 children is $351.26. The current fund for the year 
ending May 31, 1922, was $140,833.86. 

Besides the children in the orphanage, a number of children are 
being partially supported by the orphanage at their own homes, 
being supplemented by the local churches. 

The farm and dairy products made and consumed by the orphan- 
age amounted last year to $36,646.40, the dairy alone furnished 
72386 gallons of milk during the year. At 30 cents per gallon this 
would amount to $21,715.80. There was a profit from the printing 
department of $1,013.90. The entire assets of the orphanage now are 
$733,129.12. 

We would earnestly recommend to the members of this Associa- 
tion : 

First, that as individuals, we observe this year one day's work 
Thank offering for the orphanage. 

Second, that all of our Sunday-schools set apart one Sunday in 
each month as orphanage Sunday and devote their offering that 
Sunday to the orphanage. 

Third, that our Sunday-schools furnish each family represented 
in them with Charity and Children, and that every Baptist, not 
a member of the Sunday-school, subscribe for Charity and Children. 

Walter M. Gilmore. 

REPORT ON OBITUARIES 

Since the last session of the Association, the death rate has 
not been as large as in some previous years but some of our mem- 
bers have passed over the River. Among them, we recall Brother 
C. M. Byrd of Friendship, he was loved by his church; Sister 
J. M. B, Thomas of Juniper Springs, a sainted sister, has gone on ; 



18 Minutes of the 

Brother G. M. Oiirrin, a young man from the Angier Church has 
passed to the world beyond : Deacons B. C. Campbell, of Oak Grove, 
and John Broyles, of Duke, have gone to their reward after years 
of fruitful service. This is but a reminder that we, too, shall 
soon be called. Let each of us be ready when the call shall come. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. Byrd. 

FOREIGN MISSION REPORT 

Evangelism has been the central theme in progressive Christianity 
through the centuries. It was this spirit in its three-fold sense 
and all-surrendering devotion to the Father's will, an all-enriching 
love for the souls of men, and an all-absorbing interest in the 
redemption of the world from every form of sin that brought 
the Master from Heaven to earth on the great mission, "To seek 
and to save that which was lost." And ever since he stood on 
the hills of Judea and uttered his parting words to the little band 
about him, the advancement of his kingdom has been measured 
by the faithfulness of his followers in carrying out the Great Com- 
mission, "Go ye into all the world and preach the gospel to every 
creature." The outpouring of divine blessings upon the labors of his 
servants ; the triumphs of the gospel in all lands where it has 
been preached ; the large measure of Christian civilization and 
religious liberty which we today enjoy, are all verifications of the 
great promise, "Lo, I am with you, always even to the end of the 
world." 

However great they may seem, the gospel achievements in the 
mid^t of which we stand are but the beginnings of the mighty 
work which Christ would have his church accomplish. In answer 
to prayer of his people the door of all nations stands ajar today 
for the reception of the Truth. And if we whom God has so 
bountifully lavished his goodness upon should not come up to our 
obligations and privileges, the work will falter and God's kingdom 
will be delayed. 

W. M. Thomas. 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS 

The Little River Association has territory for the most part 
covered by active churches. Some sections, however, are remote 
from churches of any kind. During the past year splendid work 
was done by Rev. J. R. Everett under the direction of our State 
Board of Missions. Meetings were held at Turlington School house 
and at the Barclayville School as also at South Dunn. Regular 
preaching services have also been maintained at three other school- 
houses ; viz. Hickory Grove, Wilson's and Luart. 

Sunday-schools are kept open at two places by the students of 
Buie's Creek Academy. 



Little River Ba'ptist Association 19 

Other places are in need of similar work and the field is com- 
mended to our pastors and laymen. 

We beg also to acknowledge to our State Board of Missions a 
debt of gratitude in their sending summer workers to our Asso- 
ciation. Brother J. R. Everett and Miss Nannie Sigmon rendered 
valuable and timely labors evidenced by the baptisms reported and 
study classes held. 

Sidney A. Edgerton, Committee. 

REPORT ON BUIES CREEK ACADEMY, INCORPORATED 

As principal of Buie's Creek Academy and secretary to the board 
of trustees, we are glad to make our annual report for the school 
year 1921-'22. Our enrollment for the year was 565, with twenty- 
six young men preparing for the ministry and five or six young 
ladies preparing for mission work. We had forty four young men 
at Wake Forest College, ten at the Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary, three at the Southwestern Seminary, two at the Baptist 
Bible Institute and ten or twelve young women at Meredith College. 
During the fall term of this year our enrollment is somewhat 
larger than for the same date of last year, with twenty-three 
young men preparing for the ministry. 

During the year we have had two branch Sunday-schools con- 
ducted by a group of our students, one at Barclayville and one at 
Turlington. As a result of this work and special meetings con- 
ducted by Rev. J. R. Everett under the direction of our State Mis- 
sion Board, there were fifteen received for baptism, the new con- 
verts going to near-by Baptist churches. 

We are very happy to report that during the year Mr. D. Rich, 
of Winston-Salem, has made the largest single contribution ever 
made to Buie's Creek Academy in providing the funds for erecting 
a library building in memory of his wife, Mrs. Carrie Rich. The 
building will cost when completed from $35,000.00 to .^0,000.00. 
The contiact has already been let and the work is being pushed 
as rapidly as the material and labor can be secured. 

Dr. E. D. Poe has promised to be with us in special meetings 
to begin November 12. 

We recommend that brethren A. Parrish, B. P. Marshbanks and 
J. E. Lanier whose terms expire at this session of the Association 
be re-elected to serve as members of board of trustees for the next 
five years, and that Rev. Fred N. Day be appointed in place of 
Rev. Frank Hare, who is not now a resident of this State. 

J. A. Campbell, Committee. 



20 Minutes of the 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



The Little River W. M. U. held its sixteenth annual meeting 
with the Buie's Creek Baptist Church, September 7, 1922. 

THURSDAY MORNING 

The morning session was opened with devotional led by Mrs. 
B. P. Marshbanks, the scripture being taken from first chapter 
of Nehemiah, just the thing we need to put into practice. 

The Superintendent's report marked a splendid increase in 
Mission Study, Personal Service and in the general information 
reported by the societies to her during the year, while in finances 
we fell a little behind last year. 

The reports from the societies are always enjoyed and Mission 
Study added new interest and encouragement, this being the 
greatest year in our history in Mission Study as will be seen by 
reference to financial table. 

Mrs. E. N. Johnson told us some of the things the Campaign 
has done for State, Home and Foreign Missions; Mrs. J. A. 
McLeod the Orphanage, Hospital and Ministerial Relief, which 
made us glad we had a part in so great a work and sorry we had 
not been able to meet all the needs in each field. When we had 
listened to Mrs. Joel Layton tell about the first Missionary Socie- 
ties and Mrs. I. M. Wallace the Personal Service done in her 
society the past year we were assured that there has and will 
always be some faithful ones who receive joy untold from service. 
Miss Mamie Camp called attention to the great neglect of the 
children in our midst. The address of our own Miss Mary War- 
ren was an inspiration to every one, we feel, to do more for the 
Master in the coming year. 

After the appointment of committees we were dismissed with 
prayer by Mrs. J. B. Tugwell, to meet again at 2:30. 

THURSDAY AFTERNOON 

The afternoon devotional was led by Miss Velma Patterson. 

The reports from the young people's work were good but there 
is room for improvement; one great need is more societies with 
more folks at work. 

Miss Ada Overby gave a very interesting and helpful paper on 
"Stewardship," and Miss Cleta Naylor made a splendid talk on 
"Between the Years." Miss Mary Warren talked about the new 
magazine, "Comrades," and stressed the reading of the literature 
sent to the societies. 

Committee on Time and Place reported and adopted. Our 
meeting goes to Juniper Springs the first Thursday in Septem- 
ber, 1923. 



Little River Baptist Associatiori 21 

Committee on Nominations reported, and the following officers 
were elected for the coming year: 

Miss Mattie Bain, Superintendent. 

Mrs. J. L. Parker, Secretary. 

Mrs. B. F. McLeod, Y. W. A. Leader. 

Mrs. Joel G. Layton, Sunbeam Leader. 

Mrs. Joel G. Layton was appointed as chairman of a committee 
to make arrangements for the Little River Association to furnish 
a room in our new Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Miss Mary Warren led the closing prayer. 

THURSDAY EVENING 

Rev. S. A. Edgerton conducted the devotional exercises, dis- 
cussing the "Great Commission." Special music furnished by 
Mr. Klink and the male quartet. 

The pageant, "Ann of Ava," was given by the Coats Y. W. A., 
after which Rev. J. A. Campbell leads in closing prayer. 

MATTIE BAIN, Superintendent. 

MRS. J. L. PARKER, Secretary. 

DELEGATES 

Angler — Mrs. Willie Morgan, Miss Ada Overby. 

Antioch, W. M. S. — Mrs. G. W. O'Quinn, Mrs. W. E. Page, Mrs. 
Fannie Porter. 

Antioch, Y. W. A. — Miss Beulah O'Quinn. 

Antioch, G. A. — Zula Rogers. 

Antioch, Sunbeams — Linda O'Quinn. 

Buie's Creek, W. M. S. — Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks, Miss Evelyn 
Bryan. 

Buie's Creek, Y. W. A. — Mrs. A. E. Lynch, Miss Mabel Burt. 

Chalybeate Springs, W. M. S. — Mrs. R. E. Smith, Mrs. A. A. 
Johnson. 

Chalybeate Springs, Y. W. A. — Miss Cora M. Smith. 

Chalybeate Springs, Sunbeams — Miss Ruth Dewer. 

Coats, W. M. S. — Mrs. Irbin Smith, Mrs. T. T. Lanier. 

Coats, Y. W. A. — Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Miss Mary Stewart. 

Coats, Sunbeams — Miss Myrtle Stewart, Maisie Patterson. 

Duke, W. M. S. — Mrs. M. C. Brown, Mrs. Ed Byrd. 

Duke, Sunbeams — Mrs. A. C. McCall. 

Dunn, W. M. S. — Mrs. B. N. Johnson, Mrs. R. M. Warren. 

Dunn, Sunbeams — Miss Eleanor Hatcher. 

Friendship, W. M. S. — Mrs. C. M. Allen. 

Friendship, Sunbeams — Mrs. L. A. Bethune. 

Holly Springs, W. M. S. — Mrs. D. J. Patterson. 

Juniper Springs, W. M. S. — Mrs. Judson C. Thomas, Mrs. Paul 
Thomas. 

Lillington, W. M. S. — Mrs. W. P. Byrd, Miss Mamie F. Camp. 

Lillington, Sunbeams — Mrs. Allen Shaw. 



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TABLE No. 3- 



Churches 


Superintendents and 

POSTOFFICES 


Secretaries and 
postoffices 




C. W. Flowers, Angier 

Z J Womack. Manners 




Antioch 


H. M O'Quinn, Manners 


Baptist Chapel ... 






Baptist Grove 


J. H. Rogers, Fuquay Springs 


L. W. Bridges, Kipling .. 


Bethel 


P A Canaday, Manchester 


Miss Eva Canaday, Manchester 




I. M. Wallace, Buie's Creek 




Chalybeate Springs 


G. R Wells, Cardenas 


R. J. Keith, Cardenas 


Coats 

Cumberland Union 

Duke 


L. L. Levinson, Coats 

W. F. Lanier, Kiphng 

M C Brown, Duke 


E. F. Patterson, Coats . 

C. E. Abernathy, Kiphng 

Miss Frances Robinson, Duke 










W. L. Byrd, Duke, R. F. D 

Jas. A. Buchanan, Broadway 

W. C. Womack, Jonesboro, R. 2 




Holly Springs 

Juniper Springs 

Kennebec 


G. L. Wilson, Broadway, R. 2 

J. B. Dickens, Jonesboro, R. 2 


Lillington 

Macedonia 

Neill's Creek 


B. P. Gentry, Lillington 

J. E. Holt, Holly Springs, R. 2 

W A Parker, Cardenas 


M. R. Edwards, Lilhngton 

W. D. Griffin, Holly Springs, R. 2 

Melton Wilbon, Cardenas 








Piney Grove 

Rawles 


J. E. Matthews, Holly Springs 

J. F. Sherman, Fuquay Springs 


I. L. Howell, Varina 

A. D. Gardner, Fuquay Springs.- 


Total 



















SUNDAY SCHOOLS 



Statistical Summary 



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188 
182 

67 
113 

80 
670 
197 
167 

40 
270 
366 
146 
208 
129 


95 

146 

3t 

80 

50 

37o 

125 

105 

25 

175 

300 

100 

200 

72 










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MINUTES 



OF THE 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THE 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



HELD WITH 



SW ANN'S STATION BAPTIST CHURCH 
OCT. 30, 31 and NOV. 1, 1923 



J. C. Clifford, Moderator Dunn, N. C. 

J. W. Byrd, Vice-Moderator Bunnlevel, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell, Clerk-Treasurer Buie's Creek, N. C. 



Next session meets at Broadway, Juniper Springs Church, 
Tuesday, October 28th (7:00 p. m.), 1924 



Introductory Sermon — E. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

Alternate — J. A. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 



RALEIGH 

Bynum Printing Company 

1923 



SS 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 

HELD WITH 

SW ANN'S STATION BAPTIST CHURCH 
OCT. 30, 31 and NOV. 1, 1923 



J. C. Clifford, Moderator Dunn, N. C. 

J. W. Byrd, Vice-Moderator Bunnlevel, N. C. 

J. a; Campbell, Clerk-Treasurer Buie's Creek, N. C. 



Next session meets at Broadway, Juniper Springs Church, 
Tuesday, October 28th (7:00 p. m.), 1924 



Introductory Sermon — E. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

Alternate — J. A. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 



RALEIGH 

Bynum Printing Company 

1923 



ORDAINED MINISTERS 

J. D. Betts Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

J. A, Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

W. C. Dowd Manchester, N. C. 

A. T. Howell Duke, N. C. 

E. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

A. C. McCall R. F. D. No. 1, Duke, N. C. 

S. C. Page R. P. D. No. 4, Dunn, N. C. 

W. M. Page Buie's Creek, N. C. 

B. M. Shacklette Angier, N. C. 

H. M. Stroup Broadway, N. C. 

B. Townsend ; Buie's Creek, N. C. 

J. E. Walker Swann's Station, N. C. 



NONRESIDENT PASTORS 

R. E. Atkins R. F. D. Raleigh, N. C. 

J. S. Farmer Raleigh, N. C. 

J. L. Martin Fuquay Springs, N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL. BOARD 

L. H. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

L. L. Levinson Coats, N. C. 

B. P. Gentry Lillingtoii, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD 

J. W. Byrd C. W. Matthews C. W. Flowers 

J. M. Byrd H. Y. Smith J. C. Clifford 

J. A. Campbell 



ASSOCIATIONAL. REPRESENTATIVES 

State Missions J. C. Clifford 

Home Missions E. N. Johnson 

Foreign Missions H. M. Stroup 



TRUSTEES BUIE'S CREEK ACADEMY, INCORPORATED 

Time Expiring 1924 — J. A. Campbell, Dr. H. C. Roberts, Z. T. 

Kivett, B. Townsend. 
Time Expiring 1925 — J. A. Gates, Z. J. Womack, B. P. Gentry, 

J. M. Byrd. 
Time Expiring 1926 — E. H. Ballentine, C. H. Norris, D. H. Senter, 

P. P. Pope. 
Time Expiring 1927 — A. Parrish, B. P. Marshbanks, J. E. Lanier, 

Fred. N. Day. 
Time Expiring 1928 — J. C. Clifford, R. G. Taylor, G. F. Pope, 

J. W. Byrd. 



Proceedings 



Swann's Station, N. C. 
October 30th, 1923. 

The Little River Baptist Association met in its forty-eighth 
annual session as above, first session being at seven o'clock 
p. m. 

The introductory sermon was preached bj^ Rev. A. C. 
McCall, Duke, N. C. 

After the preaching the Association was called to order 
by former Moderator J. C. Clifford. 

Upon motion of Brother J. W. Byrd, Brother J. C. Clif- 
ford was elected Moderator for the ensuing year and J. A. 
Campbell clerk and treasurer. 

The Moderator delivered a short address and after adopt- 
ing the programme for the session on motion the Association 
adjourned until tomorrow at 9 :30 a. m. 

PROGRAMME 

October 30, 1923 

7:00 p. m. Prayer and song service — Rev. E. N. Johnson. 
7:30 p.m. Annual sermon — Rev. A. C. McCall. 

After sermon, enrollment of delegates and election 
of officers for ensuing year. 

October 31, 1923 

9:30 a.m. Devotional — Rev. E. N. Johnson. 

10:00 a.m. Temperance — B. P. Marshbanks, D. H. Senter. 

10:30 a.m. Orphanage — ^Miss Mattie Bain, B. M. Shacklette. 

11:15 a.m. Aged Ministers — J. W. Byrd, H. Y. Smith. 
Dinner. 

1:15 p.m. Devotional — Rev. B. N. Johnson. 

1:45 p.m. Associational Missions — H. Y. Smith, W. C. Dowd. 

2:15 p.m. State Missions — R. G. Taylor, H. M. Stroup. 

2:45 p. m. Home Missions — W. M. Thomas, J. C. Clifford. 

3:15 p. m. B. Y. P. U. — C. T. Matthews, A. C. McCall. 

7:00 p.m. Devotional — Rev. E. N. Johnson. 

7:30 p.m. Foreign Missions — A. E. Lynch, B. P. Gentry. 

8:15 p. m. Baptist Papers — J. A. Buchanan, J. D. Betts. 



6 FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

November 1, 1923 

9:30 a.m. Devotional — Rev. E. N. Johnson. 
10:00 a. m. Sunday Schools — L. L. Levinson, J. R. Raggett. 
10:30 a. m. Education — L. H. Campbell, E. N. Johnson. 
11:00 a.m. Rule's Creek Academy — J. A. Campbell, J. C. 

Clifford. 
11:30 a. m. Reports of Committees — 
Survey Committee; 
Time and Place of Next Association; 
Union Meetings, etc. 
Dinner. 
1:15 p.m. Devotional — Rev. E. N. Johnson. 
1:45 p.m. Woman's Work — Mrs. J. G. Layton, Dr. J. W. 

Halford. 
2:15 p.m. Obituaries — A. M. Shaw; General Discussion. 
2:45 p.m. Miscellaneous Business. 
The first person named on each topic is to write the report, 
the second one is to open the discussion. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, 
J. C. CLIFFORD, 

Committee. 

The following representatives are enrolled: 

Angier — C. W. Flowers, A. J. Smith, J. L. Johnson, Mrs. J. L. 

Johnson, S. H. Broadwell — 5. 
Antioch — D. H. Nordon, N. A. McLean, Ernest Byrd, F. L. Mc- 
Lean — 4. 
Baptist Chapel — A. L. Smith, John T. Thomas — 2. 
Baptist Grove — L. W. Bridges, W. L. Lee, H. B. Lynch, J. A. 

Gilbert — 4. 
Buie's Creek — Wm. Hatcher, L. M. Dixon, J. L. Tally, J. B. 

Ousley, Mrs. Virginia Edgerton, Mrs. J. G. Layton — 6. 
Chalybeate Springs — D. H. Senter, W. B. Lynch, R. J. Keith, 

McRay Johnson, J. L. Smith, W. F. Smith, Mrs. W. F. 

Smith — 7. 
Coats — L. L. Levinson, F. T. Tart, Miss Mattie Bain, J. M. Byrd, 

Mrs. J. M. Byrd — 5. 
Cumberland Union — T. B. Lanier, J. O. Weathers, A. F. Johnson, 

J. E. Weathers — 4. 
Dunn — E. N. Johnson, J. N. Barnett, J. C. Clifford — 3. 
Friendship- — J. W. Byrd, A. C. McCall, W. J. Bethune, F. C. 

Hobbs — 4. 
Holly Springs — H. Y. Smith, Mrs. H. Y. Smith, B. B. Wilson, 

M. C. Thomas, Tyree Smith — 5. 
Juniper Springs — W. M. Thomas, C. P. Bradley, M. S. Bradley — 3. 
Kennebec — B. W. Adams, W. E. Bond, M. T. Olive — 3. 
Lillington — A. M. Shaw — 1. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 7 

Macedonia — W. D. Griffin, J. C. Smith, D. H. Wheeler — 3. 

Neill's Creek — Charlie Matthews, J. F. Jones — 2. 

Oak Grove — Leslie Turlington, Mrs. Lina Turlington, Mrs. Lillie 

Mason, W. A. Mason — 4. 
Piney Grove — H. O. Austin, Mrs. Lettie Betts, J. D. Betts — 3. 
Swann's Station — L. G. Weathers, D. P. Graham, Lee Lamm, 

L. G. Holt, Van Gilmore — 5. 
Ordained Ministers — J. D. Betts, J. A. Campbell, E. N. Johnson, 

H. M. Stroup, J. S. Farmer, A. C. McCall — 6. 

WEDNESDAY— Morning Session 

October 31st. 

The devotional exercises were conducted by Dr. R. T. 
Vann, Educational Secretary. 

New delegates were enrolled and visitors welcomed. 

Dr. Zeno Wall, pastor of the First Baptist Church, Golds- 
boro, Dr. R. T. Vann, Educational Secretary, and Rev. A. L. 
Turner, representing- the Orphanage, were welcomed. 

The subject of Temperance was discussed by Bro. D. H. 
Senter, the report not being ready. 

Miss Mattie Bain read the report on Baptist Orphanage. 
On motion to adopt the report was discussed by Rev. A. L. 
Turner, and the report was adopted. 

Brother J. A. Buchanan read the report on Baptist Papers. 
The report was discussed by Rev. J. D. Betts and Rev. J. S. 
Farmer and on motion was adopted. 

The Association adjourns one hour for dinner. 

WEDNESDAY— Afternoon Session 

J. A. Campbell read the report on Education and made 
report on Buie's Creek Academy. 

The subject of Education was discussed by Dr. Zeno Wall 
and Dr. R. T. Vann and the reports were adopted. 

Twenty-nine young ministerial students and fifteen young 
volunteer women, all students at Buie's Creek Academy, 
were present and were introduced by Principal J. A. Camp- 
bell. 

Brother J. N. Barnett, field Sunday school secretary, spoke 
on the subject of Sunday schools. 



8 FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

The Moderator appoints Brethren H. M. Stroup, T. B. 
Lanier and H. Y. Smith a committee to select Time, Place 
and Preacher for the next Association and the next Union 
Meeting. 

WEDNESDAY— Night Session 

Devotional exercises were conducted by Moderator Clif- 
ford. 

Report on Aged Ministers was read by Brother H. Y. 
Smith and after being discussed by him, on motion, the re- 
port was adopted. 

Brother W. M. Thomas read the report on Home Missions 
and the report was discussed by Moderator Clifford, Rev. 
H. M. Stroup and Brother H. Y. Smith. 

The report on Associational Missions was read by Brother 
C. W. Flowers and, upon motion to adopt, Brother Stroup 
discussed the same. 

On Motion, the Association adjourned until tomorrow at 
9 :30 a. m. 

THURSDAY— Morning Session 

The devotional exercises were conducted by J. A. Camp- 
bell. 

The reports on Sate Missions and Foreign Missions were 
read, and both subjects were discussed together. Brethren 
H. M. Stroup, Frank Hare and J. A. Campbell discussed the 
reports and they were adopted. 

Brother L. L. Levinson read the report on Sunday Schools 
and discussed the subject. 

The report was adopted. 

THURSDAY— Afternoon Session 

Committee on Time, Place and Preachers reported: 

The next Association to meet with the Juniper Springs 
Church, Tuesday, October 28, 1924, first session at 7:00 
p. m. 

Rev. E. N. Johnson to preach the sermon ; alternate, J. A. 
Campbell. 

Moderator and Clerk to arrange the programme. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 9 

The next Union Meeting to be held at Neill's Creek 
Church on the Saturday before the fifth Sunday in Decem- 
ber, 1923. Rev. E. C. Shoe to preach on Saturday and Rev. 
H. M. Stroup to preach on Sunday. 

Rev. A. C. McCall and Brother J. F. Jones were appointed 
to prepare the programme. 

On motion, Rev. A. C. McCall was appointed as delegate to 
the Souther-n Baptist Convention, Rev. H. M. Stroup, 
alternate. 

Brethren J. C. Clifford, J. A. Campbell and H. M. Stroup 
were elected to represent the Association at the Baptist 
State Convention. 

The Association elected the folloAving representatives: 

State Missions— J. C. Clifford. 
Home Missions — E. N. Johnson. 
Foreign Missions — H. M. Stroup. 

Sunday School Board — 

L. H. Campbell L. L. Levinson 

B. P. Gentry 

Executive Board — 

J. W. Byrd J. M. Byrd 

C. W. Flowers C. W. Matthews 

H. Y. Smith J. A. Campbell 

J. C. Clifford 

Mrs. J. G. Lay ton read the report on Woman's Work. 
T^ie report was discussed by Mrs. Layton and Miss Mattie 
Bain and, on motion, was adopted. 

The report on Obituaries was read and words of apprecia- 
tion were spoken about Rev. S. A. Edgerton, of Buie's Creek, 
pastor of Antioch, Lillington and Neill's Creek churches; 
Deacon H. C. McNeill of Dunn ; J. E. Link of Coats ; J. M. 
Dickens of Juniper Springs; Mrs. Louise Thomas, Baptist 
Chapel; D. A. Wicker and Mrs. Wicker, Swann's Station; 
Henry Revels, Kennebec. 



10 FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

The Survey Committee appointed a year ago, not being 
ready to report, on motion, the committee is continued to 
report next year. Committee: E. N. Johnson, J. A. Camp- 
bell, H. M. Stroup, B. P. Gentry and J. C. Clifford. 

The Association extended a hearty vote of thanks to the 
church and community of Swann's Station for their 
bounteous hospitality in entertaining this session of the Asso- 
ciation. 

All unfinished business is left with the Moderator and 
Clerk. 

There being no further business, on motion, the Associa- 
tion adjourned to meet in 1924 at Juniper Springs. 

Benediction by the Clerk. 

J. C. Clifford, 

Moderator. 
J. A. Campbell, 

Clerk. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES, TABLES, ETC. 



REPORT OF TREASURER OF ASSOCIATION FOR 1922 

Received from churches for minutes and clerk $ 87.55 

Received for convention objects 781.41 



Total amount received $ 868.96 

Paid for minutes and clerk $ 87.55 

Paid treasurer of convention 781.41 

Total amount paid out $ 868.96 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. CAMPBELL, 

Treasurer. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



11 



SENT TO ASSOCIATION 





Minute Fund 


Angier 


._$ 5.00 


Antioch 


5.00 


Baptist Grove 


2.65 


Baptist Chapel 


1.00 


Bethel 


3.00 


Buie's Creek 


8.00 


Coats 


._ 10.00 


Chalybeate Springs 


5.00 


Cumberland Union _ 


5.05 


Dunn 


._ 10.00 


Friendship 


5.00 


Holly Springs 


8.25 


Juniper Springs 


5.00 


Kennebec 


4.00 


Lillington 


5.00 


Macedonia 


3.00 


Neill's Creek 


5.00 


Oak Grove 


3.00 


Piney Grove 


8.00 


Rawles 


2.00 


Swann's Station 


5.00 



Convention Objects Total 



$107.95 



40.50 
24.81 



14.00 

;07.58 



5.00 

32.00 

Y3~69 
75.00 
12.70 



$1,025.2: 



45.50 
5.00 

27.46 
1.00 

17.00 
815.58 

10.00 
5.00 
5.05 

10.00 
5.00 

13.25 
5.00 

36.00 
5.00 

16.69 

80.00 

15.70 
8.00 
2.00 
5.00 



$1,133.23 



J. A. CAMPBELL, 

Treasurer. 



REPORTS FOR 1924 



Order of Business — J. A. Campbell, J. C. Clifford. 
Baptist Literature — Henderson Steele, J. S. Farmer. 
State Missions — C. D. Bain, A. T. Howell. 
Associational Missions — D. H. Senter, H. M. Stroup. 
Home Missions — H. Y. Smith, A. C. McCall. 
Foreign Missions — Miss Mattie Bain, J. C. Clifford. 
Education — B. P. Gentry, B. P. Marshbanks. 
Aged Ministers — ^A. M. Shaw, R. G. Taylor. 
Orphanage — J. D. Betts, B. F. McLeod. 
Temperance — W. M. Thomas, J. M. Byrd. 
Woman's Work — Mrs. B. Townsend, L. L. Levinson. 
Sunday Schools — B. P. Gentry, J. A. McLeod. 
Buie's Creek Academy — J. A. Campbell, E. N. Johnson. 
Obituaries — J. W. Byrd, General Discussion. 
B. Y. P. U. — C. W. Flowers, B. M. Shacklette. 
The first named are to write the report and the second are 
to make the opening speech. 



12 FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

REPOUT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF 

Among the objects supported by our convention none are 
more worthy of loyal support of all our people than ministerial 
relief. 

Our old ministers have given lives of useful service to the 
upbuilding of the Kingdom of God in our midst and the exten- 
sion of that work to the foreign land. Truly in the accomplish- 
ment of these results we may rightly regard ourselves as a 
favored people, but we would prove ourselves unworthy of such 
a heritage should we fail to supply their needs. 

It was through our aged ministers that we have been blessed. 
Therefore, we owe them a debt we can never repay. Your com- 
mittee recommend that a collection be taken in all our churches 
for this object, and sent promptly to the Relief Board. 

J. W. BYRD, 
Committee. 



REPORT FOR ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS 

Jesus said, "Ye shall be my witnesses both in Jerusalem and 
Judea and in Samaria and unto the uttermost parts of the 
earth." 

Witnessing at home is even more important than witnessing 
abroad. 

Associational Missions is the bed rock of all other missions. 
We must see to it that the Gospel is preached in all the destitute 
sections of our association or else other denominations will take 
the field. 

There is now the greatest need for more work to be done than 
ever before in the history of our association. 

There is the most promising outlook for our association if 
only we will do our full duty for Associational Missions. 

We must put more workers in the field. Our people are better 
able to support the work now than ever before. Our churches 
are growing in membership and our church members are getting 
more and more prosperous in wealth every year and there is no 
reason why our mission work should suffer now as it has 
suffered in the past. Our soil is producing crops as never before 
in our history and prices are good. Our association is becoming 
more densely populated each year and there are long stretches 
of territory unoccupied by Baptists in our beloved association. 

"So the call came louder and longer than ever before 
Go ye and preach my gospel to every creature." 

C. W. FLOWERS 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 13 



PERIODICALS 



There are two ways of obtaining knowledge: 

First, by observation. We should refrain ourselves from optical 
scenes that tend to lower our best aspirations and character. 

Second, by reading. So the things we learn by reading be- 
come a part of our life and character. We should be very care- 
ful to select such literature as will develop Christian character 
in our homes. 

We should not depend on secular papers to develop our home 
life. We would recommend our denominational papers such as 
the Biblical Recorder, Charity and Children, Home and Foreign 
Fields, for our knowledge of our Christian work and the develop- 
ment of Christian character in our home life. 

Third, the reading of good books. For daily reading, we would 
place the Bible, the Word of God, at the head of the list. "Search 
the Scriptures for in them ye think ye have eternal life but 
they are they which testify of Me." 

JAS. A. BUCHANAN, 

Committee. 



REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

The greatest people the sun shines upon today surely is the 
"New South." We are not boasting when we say we are great 
more ways than one. Space would fail me to relate our great- 
ness. We ought to feel profoundly grateful to God for it. Let 
me just speak of one of our greatnesses. As a denomination, 
we present a mighty host 3,000,000 strong. We thank God for 
every one of them and wish for more. When we think of their 
enlistment, our hearts sadden. Only about forty per cent of 
them are actively supporting the 7 5-Million Campaign. The en- 
listing of this mighty host is a part of the work of the Home 
Board. Like the cook cutting biscuits from a batch of dough, 
'many of our nooks and corners are not covered by State work. 
This necessity calls to action our great Home Board. 

The wealth of the South, and especially our own State, calls 
for great things along the financial line this year. We ought 
to pay every dollar of our pledges this year. We have put off 
paying our pledges till the last moment, and now we find them 
larger than we thought. With cotton at thirty cents and tobacco 
selling well, I see no reason why we should not pay four-fifths 
of our pledges this year. 

From the last report of the Home Board, one has every reason 
to take courage. The work has grown very rapidly in the last 
four years. The Board's report at Kansas City showed that 



14 FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

there was a total of 1,12 missionaries in the home field who 
baptized 38,770 and added to the churches 59,597. Besides this 
2,249 volunteers were enlisted. They helped to construct and 
build 46 5 churches and organized 622 Sunday schools. 

The work has been carried along largely among Indians, for- 
eigners, negroes, soldiers and sailors as well as in the more 
destitute sections along the Mississippi, in the mountains, and 
large cities, reaching as far as Cuba and Panama. 

This Board has been greatly crippled by our laxity in meet- 
ing our obligations. It has sheared down till efficiency is im- 
oeriled. Unless there is a rallying along the line of finances 
there will be greater reduction, which will be too serious to 
think about. It will be no less than tragic if we do not keep 
a strong force at home. We must keep the home fires burning. 

Realizing the great blessing that has come to us in the past 
and that is to come from doing our duty in this trying hour, 
we beg to venture the following suggestions: 

1. That we perform our duty by paying four-fifths of our 
pledges by December. 

2. That we secure cash subscriptions from all new converts. 

3. That we secure cash from all who did not make a pledge, 
and 

4. That stewardship be taught in all our churches from the 
pulpit, prayer meetings, Sunday schools and special study classes. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. M. THOMAS. 

REPORT OF B. Y. P. U. WORK 

The B. Y. P. U. aim is "Training in Church Membership," 
and in the training of a host of young Christians to do active 
work in our churches. I feel that the B. Y. P. U. fills a very 
important place in the services of our churches. 

We had 17 unions in our association last year, with 631 mem- 
bers, 311 of which kept up with the daily Bible readings, 165 
took a study course book, 217 systematic givers and 35 volun- 
teered for ministry or mission work. The training of these 631 
young Christians of our association is a service, the value of 
which eternity alone can reveal. 

B, Y. P. U.'s have been organized in several of our churches 
this year that have not heretofore had a union. Through the 
invaluable services of Brother F. G. Womack, in the several in- 
stitutes held by him this summer, our membership was increased 
and stimulated. 

We have 5,017 church members in our association, with only 
631 members in our B. Y. P. U.'s. The figures above speak en- 
couragement to our efforts, but they reveal a great opportunity, 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 15 

as we have only a little more than ten per cent of our church 
membership in our B. Y. P. U.'s. 

Soon the mantle is to fall from the shoulders of the present 
burden bearers of our churches. May we as young people be 
trained for the service that will in a very short time be ours to 
perform. The B. Y. P. U. program proclaims a challenge to our 
young people. Shall we accept? 

C. T. MATTHEWS, 

Committee. 



REPORT ON FOREIGN 3IISSIONS 

We find in reading over the report on Foreign Missions in 
our minutes of 18 8 5 that there were only 38 missionaries and 
40 native assistants on foreign fields. In one year's time there 
was an increase of 12 missionaries and 16 native assistants. In 
studying the minutes of each succeeding year we find that our 
Foreign Mission work has grown rapidly. Realizing more fully 
the Master's command, "Go ye into all the world and preach 
the gospel to every living creature," the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention at Atlanta under the guidance of the Holy Spirit planned 
out the greatest five-year program in its history. Marvelous 
growth in our foreign mission work has been made possible by 
the campaign. 

We have now 8 91 churches in sixteen foreign lands; 211 or 
practically one-fourth of these churches are self-supporting; 442 
or one-half have their own houses of worship. In addition to 
the churches there are 2,8 9 6 out-stations which give us a total 
of practically 4,000 stations where the Word of God is preached 
regularly. Last year was the crowning year in baptisms, 12,611 
were baptized, which is 4,720 more than reported the year be- 
fore. We have passed the 100,000 mark in membership. We 
have 103,328 members. These gave $4.23 per capita last year. 
We have 796 schools which were attended last year by 32,789 
scholars. This is about equal to the number of students in 
our Baptist schools in the Southland. Of course all of our 
schools in foreign lands are not of equal grade to those in the 
South, but we have our students in these foreign lands under 
our tutelage quite as long as we have the students in our 
Southern schools. There were 1,447 Sunday schools, which had 
an enrollment of 67,40 7. We have now 5 01 foreign missionaries 
and 2,82 native missionaries. This is almost twice as many 
foreign missionaries and almost four times as many native mis- 
sionaries as we had in 1919 at the beginning of the 7 5-Million 
Campaign. 

In spite of this glowing report and wonderful progress made 
these four years the Board reported at the last convention a 



16 FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

debt of $403,00 0. Because of this great debt more than fifty young 
people, could not have gone as missionaries had it not been for 
voluntary subscriptions made by the delegates of the convention. 
Since there are great hosts of young people who are willing 
and anxious to give their lives to the foreign fields, let us not 
fail to pay in full our 7 5-Million Campaign pledge. This is the 
most imperative need for foreign missions this year. So let each 
one of us take new courage and try to meet this heavy debt 
that is upon us. If each pledge is paid, the Board can pay its 
debts, support each missionary and plan for many other needs. 

A. E. LYNCH, 

Committee. 



REPORT OX SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

If there is one key that will open the way for our program 
of evangelism that key is the organized, efficient Sunday school. 
The Sunday school is the most powerful agency in the hands of 
our churches. We are just awakening to a 'realization of this 
fact, but are not fully awake to the opportunity which it presents. 

You will observe that I said organized and efficient Sunday 
schools. In 192 2 out of a total of 2 2 churches in the Little 
River Association there were only five graded Sunday schools. 
This is appalling. No Sunday school is capable of doing effective 
work unless that Sunday school is well organized and graded. 
The need for this is so apparent that one of the burdens of 
this association ought to be to see that every one of the twenty- 
two churches has an organized, graded school. 

It occurs to your committee that our adult church members 
have not gotten away from the obsolete idea that a Sunday school 
is a place for young people and children. There is no doubt that 
this has hurt our Sunday school attendance to a large extent and 
is the principal reason why the enrollment in our Sunday schools 
is not equivalent to the membership of our churches. It is 
obvious that if our adult church members could realize their duty 
and responsibility to the Sunday school our enrollment would be 
larger than our church membership, and when this happens we 
shall see the full flower of the present flourishing Sunday school 
and reap the full fruits of our glorious opportunity. 

Shall we not then, upon this occasion, determine upon a course 
that will tend to educate our adult members to the end that they 
shall see their duty to the Sunday schools and bring about a glo- 
rious condition in our association. 

L. L. LEVINSON, 

Committee. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 17 



ORPHANAGE 



For tliirty-eiglit years the Baptist people of North Carolina 
have been providing for orphan* children in a definite way 
through our Orphanage at Thomasville. Later the Kennedy Home 
was added and now there are 45 children at Thomasville and 
100 at the Kennedy Home. These children are supported at a 
cost of $19.85 per capita per month. 

Twenty-three men and forty-eight women make up the working 
forces at both institutions. These men and women give their 
whole time to the Orphanage work of teaching and training the 
children for useful service in life. No "loafing" is allowed. 
Every child old enough to work is required to do his or her 
part. Of course the play-life of the child is not neglected, but 
during work hours each boy and girl, except the little ones in 
the nurseries, is expected and required to work. 

There are thirteen separate families at Thomasville and three 
at the Kennedy Home. The cottage system, the plan established 
by Dr. John H. Mills at the beginning, has been continued through 
the years. Children are promoted from one cottage to another 
as they advance in their studies. 

Two hundred and thirty children are being partially supported 
by the Orphanage at their own homes making it possible to keep 
mothers and children together. The plan is to supplement the in- 
come of a mother who is strong and competent so that she may 
keep the children under her tender care. A capable woman is 
employed to visit the homes thus aided, as well as to investigate 
those applying for aid. The results up to this time have been 
entirely satisfactory. 

There is no branch of our Mission Work that appeals to the 
Christian man and woman more than that of the Orphanage and 
yet there are many children denied this help, who are just as 
worthy and promising as those already enjoying the blessings 
and protection of the Orphanage, because there is not enough 
money in hand to provide the buildings and ^support needed. It 
is earnestly hoped that every Baptist in the Little River Associa- 
tion will read Charity and Children more the coming year, that 
the monthly and Thanksgiving offerings may be real love gifts. 
The marvelous way in which the Lord has blessed the institution 
is a loud call for our continued loyalty. 

MATTIE BAIN, 

Committee. 
REPORT ON EDUCATION 

Religious organizations have been pioneers in education. Long 
before the State undertook its present system of schools, Harvard, 
William and Mary, and other church institutions were well 
established. Even with the present tremendous program of 



18 FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

expansion, the latest figures show that there are about six times 
as many denominational colleges and universities as State insti- 
tutions. Students in these colleges outnumber those educated in 
state schools by about three to one. 

Baptists in the United States owned and controlled, in 1921, 
6 4 colleges, 31 junior colleges, and 72 academies, valued at 
$145,000,000. Enrolled in these institutions were 48,434 stu- 
dents. In the South we had 41 colleges, 24 junior colleges, and 
68 academies, valued at $37,500,000, in which were 31,936 pupils. 
In North Carolina we have at present 2 standard colleges, 3 
junior colleges, and about 10 high schools, with a total enroll- 
ment of more than 4,000 students. Our own association has 
within its borders Buie's Creek Academy, Incorporated, which 
owns property connected with Buie's Creek, privately owned, 
worth over $100,000. Last year this school enrolled 621 pupils, 
of which number 26 young men were preparing themselves to 
preach, and ten girls for special religious work. About 38 were 
baptized out of this student body last year. 

If our denomination is to continue its wonderful growth it 
must train its leaders for the pulpit and the pew. It is a dis- 
tressing fact that our denomination has not kept pace with the 
State and with other denominations in the growth of its schools. 
We cannot neglect these institutions without endangering the 
future program of missions and of other convention objects. 
Training for Christian service is just as essential for Christian 
workers as vocational training is for the professional and busi- 
ness man. 

The hope of the world is in Christianity. The future of Chris- 
tianity depends on the leaders trained today. W. J. Bryan is 
quoted as saying that one-third of our college professors do not 
believe in God. Whether this be true or not it is true that we 
are living in an age of materialism, rationalism, and atheism. It 
is sadly true that our institutions of learning have been the seed- 
bed for such doctrines. It would be much better for our children 
to remain in ignorance with a firm faith in God than to become 
educated atheists. America, with her Christian colleges and 
schools, stands out today in bold contrast to Germany. 

Let us support our Christian institutions of learning in our 
sympathies, our patronage and our prayers. 

L. H. CAMPBELL, 

Committee. 

REPORT ON BUIE'S CREEK ACADEMY, INCORPORATED 

Buie's Creek Academy reports a prosperous year. For the 
scholastic year 1922-23 the enrollment was 620, representing in 
its patronage about seventy counties, seven States, and China. The 
enrollment for the fall term 19 2 3 is greater than for the same 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 19 

date last year. The enrollment of ministerial students last year 
was 26; we have enrolled this fall 34. The number of young 
women who purpose to do distinctive religious work numbered 
last year 12. This fall the number is 15. 

The religious life of the school is good, never better. We 
have an A-1 Sunday school, large attendance at our B. Y. P. U., 
and fine attendance at our preaching services. At this time Dr. 
Zeno Wall,- pastor of the First Church, Goldsboro, is conducting 
a series of revival services, with 2 6 received for baptism. 

Groups of our students are conducting mission Sunday schools 
at Barclaysville and Turlington on Sunday evenings, with an at- 
tendance of about 75 at each place. Several of our ministerial 
students are pastors of churches and do supply work in nearby 
churches. 

In our physical equipment we have made the finest improve- 
ments since the school was established. We have built a 
new dormitory for boys and is now being occupied. The building 
is of brick, two stories, forty-five rooms, affording accommoda- 
tion for ninety boys. It is furnished with new furniture, has 
electric lights, steam heat, and will soon have a supply of water. 
We have an artesian well and believe we have a fine supply of 
water. 

To Brother Alonzo Parrish, of Benson, one of our former 
students, a member of our Board of Trustees, we are greatly 
indebted. He is furnishing the school with a deep-well pump, 
tank, steel tower, gasoline engine, a complete outfit for furnish- 
water supply. This liberal and timely gift will be a great 
blessing to the school. 

Our new dormitory, with equipment, will cost about $35,000. 
The money put into this building comes from the 75-Million 
Campaign Fund. We owe on this building nearly $20,000, 
which we must provide for by order of the trustees. 

The Carrie Rich Memorial Library building will be completed 
in the early spring. This princely gift from Bro. D. Rich, 
Winston-Salem, will be one of the finest and prettiest buildings in 
all our State. The donor is determined to spare no pains nor 
money in making this a fitting and perpetual memorial to his 
good wife and a permanent blessing to the young men and 
young women who shall come to Buie's Creek for all generations. 
This good friend to Buie's Creek has given birth to a great senti- 
ment which under God let us pass on to all the people: "Buie's 
Creek Must Live." Such a noble sentiment adopted as our 
slogan, with God's blessings still continued upon our work, will 
make Buie's Creek one of the great institutions of our land. 

This library building with equipment will cost at least $40,000. 
All together, therefore, we are adding more than $75,000 to our 
property this year, all owned and controlled through our Board 
of Trustees by the denomination. 



20 FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

We recommend that Brethren J. C. Clifford, R. G. Taylor, G. F. 
Pope, and J. W. Byrd, whose terms expire at this time, be re- 
appointed to succeed themselves, and that Dr. H. C. Roberts, of 
Coats, be appointed in place of Dr. J. F. McKay, and Bro. D. H. 
Senter in place of Bro. J. G. Layton. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. CAMPBELL, 
Principal of Buie's Creek Academy and Secretary of the Board 
of Trustees. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 21 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



The Little River W. M. U. held its seventeenth annual meet- 
ing with the Juniper Springs Baptist Church, September 6, 1923. 

THURSDAY MORNING 

The opening devotional was led by Miss Grace Thomas. Twenty- 
two societies were represented by delegates, others by letter, 
bringing reports for the year that were encouraging. No large 
gain in any one point but some real work that made many glad 
hearts. The Friendship, Chalybeate Springs, and Lillington 
Sunbeam Bands reached A-1, while the Friendship and Bethel 
W. M. S. and the Buie's Creek Dormitory Y. W. A. deserve special 
mention, failing only in one point. Two hundred dollars was 
raised during the year to furnish the Mattie Taylor Bain Room 
in our Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Mrs. D. B. Andrews named some of the blessings the 7 5-Million 
Campaign has brought to us and our mission work. Mrs. J. A. 
Campbell's report of her trip overseas and the Baptist World's 
Alliance in Stockholm made us happy that we had such a 
splendid representative at this meeting. We were very fortunate 
in having Rev. W. M. Gilmore speak to us on Stewardship and 
Miss Mary Warren on Our Seven-Fold Objective. The time was 
too, short to hear all the good things they might have told us 
along these lines. 

After the appointment of committees we were dismissed with 
prayer by Miss Mary Warren, to meet again at 1:30. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Miss Beulah O'Quinn conducted the devotional. The after- 
noon session was given largely to the work of our Junior 
Societies. Miss Grace Thomas told how God's Call came to her; 
Mrs. S. A. Edgerton, The Special Need of Y. W. A. and G. A. 
Work, followed by Sunbeams and Sunday Worship by Mrs. 
Allen Shaw. 

The report of the Committee on Time and Place was adopted. 
Our next meeting will be the first Thursday in September, 192 4, 
with the Friendship Baptist Church. 

Committee on nominations reported and the following officers 
were elected for the coming year: 

Miss Mattie Bain, Superintendent; Miss Beulah O'Quinn, Sec- 
retary; Mrs. S. A. Edgerton, Y. W. A. Leader; Mrs. Joel Layton, 
Sunbeam Leader; Miss Mattie Bain, Mission Study Chairman. 

Mrs. S. A. Edgerton led the closing prayer. 

MATTIE BAIN, Superintendent. 

BEULAH O'QUINN, Secretary. 



22 FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

DEIiEGATES 

Antioch — Misses Lillie Patterson, Zula Rogers, Beulah O'Quinn. 
Buie's Creek — Mrs. J. L. Long, Mrs. B. P. McLeod, Mrs. J. A. 

Campbell. 
Chalybeate Springs — Misses Ruth Dewar, Cora and Nora Smith. 
Coats — Mrs. H. C. Stewart, Mildred Parrish. 
Friendship — Mrs. F. D. Byrd, Mrs. C. M. Allen, Mrs. H. B. 

Woodley. 
Holly Springs — Mrs. H. Y. Smith, Mrs. D. J. Patterson, Miss 

Ruth Patterson, 
Juniper Springs — Mrs. W. M. Thomas, Miss Grace Thomas, Mrs. 

J. M. Primm. 
Lillington — Mrs. W. P. Byrd, Mrs. Allen Shaw, Mrs. Clarence 

McNeill. 
Swann Station — Mrs. M. L. Womack, Mrs. B. M. Wilson, Mrs. 

L. D. Thomas. 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



TABLE I- 



Church 


Pastor and Postoffice 


Clerk and Postoffice 


\ngier 


B. M. Shacklette, Angier 


C. W. Flowers, Angier 




A. C. McCall, Bunlevel 




Baptist Chapel _- 


H. M. Stroup, Broadway 

W. C. Howard, Wake Forest 




Baptist Grove 


H. B. Lynch, Fuquay Springs ---. 

W. G. Elmore, Linden 


Bethel 




Buie's Creek 


J. A . Campbell, Buie's Creek 


J. F. Blackman, Buie's Creek - 


Chalybeate Springs 

Coats 


J. S. Farmer, Raleigh 

J A Campbell Buie's Creek 


W. J. Norris, Chalybeate Springs 

F Patterson Coats 


Cumberland Union 


W. M. Page, Buie's Creek 


W. F. Lanier, Kipling 


Duke 




M. C. Brown, Duke 








Friendship 


A C. McCall, Bunlevel 


J. McD. Parker, Bunlevel 




H. Y. Smith, Broadway, R. 2 


Juniper Springs 

Kennebec 


H. M. Stroup, Broadway 


H. A. Thomas, Broadway 


B M Shacklette, Angier 


W. E Bond, Willow Springs 








Macedonia 

Neill's Creek 


R. E. Atkins, Raleigh, R. 2 

A. C. McCall, Bunlevel-- 


J. C. Smith, Holly Springs, R. 2 

J. H. Morgan, Lillington, R. 1 

N. I. Reardon, Angier, R. 2 - 


Piney Grove--__' 

Rawles 

Swann's Stati on 

Total 


R. E. Atkins, Raleigh, R. 2 

J. L. Martin, Fuquay Springs 

H. M. Stroup, Broadway 


W. W. Seawell, Fuquay Springs 

C. T. Smith, Fuquay Springs 

D. A. Graham, Jonesboro, R. 3 









♦Report of 1922 



STATISTICAL 





HA. 


>> 

i. 

o 


0) 

£ 
o 

It 

>P4 


Gains 


Losses 


P. 


Treasurer and Postoffice 


a 

.23 

1 
« 
>> 

pq 


1 


1 

a 
1 

PQ 


1 


PQ 


1 


i 

Q 


-1 

a 

a; 


J L Johnson, Angier 


2&4 
1 &3 
1&2 

2 

2 
2&4 
2&4 
1 &3 


S 1,000 
3,000 
1,200 
2,000 
2,000 

25,000 
5,000 
4,000 
1,000 
5,000 

77,000 
6,000 
3,500 
6,000 
1,500 

20,000 
2,700 
2,000 
1,500 
6,000 
1,500 
2,000 


$ 




12 
23 
16 
5 

4 
71 
16 
5 
5 


4 

1 
1 






2 

7 


"io 


5 


212 


Z. J. Womack, Lillington, R. 3. . _ . 


"~2 


2 
2 


454 


J. R. Howard, Jonesboro, R. 2 


87 


H. B. Lynch, Fuquay Springs 


1 
1 

35 
7 

11 


7 
""'7 


1 

I 


189 










102 


B. F. McLeod, Buie's Creek 

W. J. Norris, Chalybeate Springs 


20 

1 
1 


— - 


1 


750 

286 


Mattie Bain, Coats 








2 
3 


200 


J. C. Hardee, Kipling 






77 




1&3 

every 
2&4 
2 &4 
1 &3 

2 










148 




10,000 
""2^500 


8 
21 
37 
13 

6 


29 

7 






24 
1 
3 
4 
2 


2 


4 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
.... 

2 


541 


F. D. Byrd, Bunlevel 


.... 


2 
1 


238 


J. R. Patterson, Broadway, R. 2 


292 


W. M. Thomas, Broadway. 


6 




193 


W. E. Bond, Willow Springs.. 






88 


Henderson Steele, Lillington 


5 
1 
2 
5 

10 
3 
8 






115 


J. C. Smith, Holly Springs, R. 2 


1 
3 
4 
1 
4 
3 




7 
9 
3 

27 




2 


5 

1 


1 


230 
167 


N. I. Reardon, Angier, R. 2 






85 


W. W. Seawell, Fuquay Springs 


.... 


2 


4 
3 
2 


1 
2 


414 
75 


B. C. Poole, Jonesboro, R. 4 




13 






155 














1178,900 


$ 12,500 


291 


140 


2 


12 


113 


30 


38 


5,098 









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$ 804.65 

1,589.54 

276.36 

498.67 

131.00 

4,805.38 

3,010.96 

1,868.56 

391.55 




12,752.00 

1,413.58 

1,167.64 

3,460.87 

168.50 

662.42 

394.64 

428.25 

158.70 

3,681.49 

208.50 

1.105.87 




CO 

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6© 


75.86 

24.81 

14.00 

2,451.47 

1,847.26 

1,032.12 

114.55 


3,123.12 

320.10 

672.99 

209.25 

32.00 

152.42 

34.63 

98.25 

15.70 

261.19 

14.50 

275.48 


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34.00 

7.85 

4.00 

318.53 

142.46 

229.33 

2.55 


743.66 
39.04 

112.16 
84.25 


35.95 
20.94 
23.25 
3.00 
133.37 




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772.94 
659.73 
664.01 
87.00 


2,299.96 
266.06 
494.65 
125.00 
32.00 
100.00 


t2 


97.50 
14.50 
181.46 


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TABLE III- 



CnrRCH 


Superintendent and Postoffice 


Secretary and Postoffice 






Grady Earp, Angier 

Lola O'Quinn, Mamers 


Antioch 


Z. J. Womack, Lillington, R. 3 


Baptist Chapel 


Baptist Grove 


W. D. Howell, Fuquay Springs 


W. L. Lee, Fuquay Springs 




T. W. Bray, Buie's Creek 




BetheL 


A. A. West, Manchester 


Ora Elmore, Linden 


Buie's Creek 


I. M. Wallace, Buie's Creek 

G. R. Wells, Cardenas, R. 1 


Emily Roberson, Buie's Creek 






Coats 


L. L. Levinson, Coats 


0. F. Patterson, Coats 








Duke. 






Dunn 


M. M. Jernigan, Dunn 


Alfred Blalock, Dunn 




J. McD. Parker, Bunlevel ._. 




Holly Springs 


B. B. Wilson, Broadway, R. 2 


Pierce Patterson, Broadway, R. 2 




Taft Dickens, Jonesboro, R. 2 .. . .. 


Kennebec 


W. E. Bond, Willow Springs 


Nolan McLean, Willow Springs -.. - - 


Lillington 


B. P. Gentry, LilHngton 

A. S. Austin, Holly Springs, R. 2 

J. H. Morgan, Lillington, R 1 


Henderson Steele, Lillington 


Macedonia 

Neill's Creek 


R. E. Austin, Holly Springs, R. 2 

Mazie Johnson, Lillington, R. 1 


Oak Grove .. 


B. C. Hockaday, Angier, R. 2 

G. T. Watkins, Holly Springs, R. 2 

I D Smith, Fuquay Springs 


N. I. Reardon, Lillington, R. 1. - 


Piney Grove 


J. C. Adcock, Walthall 


Rawles 


A D Gardner, Fuquay Snrings . - 


Swann's Station 


C. R. Graham, Swann's Station 

J L. Willoughby, Buie's Creek 


Elsie Womack, Swann's Station 


Total 













H 



SUNDAY SCHOOLS 



Enrollment Main School 


Miscellaneous 


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157 


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10 


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7 
14 
3 


$ 103.00 
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$ 


$ 103.00 


12 


30 


8 
12 
16 


14 


27 


66 


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5 






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18 


10 


26 




84 
60 
180 
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212 
175 


-— 


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no 

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no 
yes 


no 

yes 
no 

yes 


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8 


4 

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14.00 
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66.26 
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14.00 


30 

8 
14 


12 
10 
15 


35 

29 
20 


85 
30 
35 


40 
25 
18 


438 

no 

65 


40 

""8 


150.00 
39.15 
134.76 


357.91 
105.41 
248.48 


































48 
12 
13 
10 


21 
17 
20 


37 
33 
31 


45 
37 
56 


42 
31 

54 


187 
64 
58 


70 
"25 


450 
194 
257 
110 
67 
128 
151 


32 

"38 


yes 
yes 
yes 
no 
no 
yes 
no 


yes 
no 
no 
no 
no 
no 
no 


110 

8 

35 


7 
8 
30 
11 
6 


461.98 
50.00 
85.00 
46.00 


851.66 

39.04 

25.00 

5.95 


1,313.64 
89.04 
110.00 
51.95 


4 


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20 




12 
18 

29 


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60 


34 




44 




9 


66.00 
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62.64 
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56.57 
















60 
250 

96 
131 

60 


















10 
6 


26 


22 
25 


47 
15 


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25 


130 
25 


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no 


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22 


68.00 


45.62 


113.62 


12 


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no 


no 




12 


30.59 


53.25 


83.84 


8 














































252 


189 


299 


441 


363 


1,246 


187 


3,642 


110 






226 


161 


$ 1,378.40 


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MINUTES 



OF THE 



Forty-Ninth Annual Session 



OF THE 



LITTLE RIVER 

Baptist Association, 



HELD WITH 



Broadway Baptist Church, 

October 28, 29 and 30, 1924 



J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator i Dunn, N. C. 

J. W. BYRD, Vice-Moderator Bunnlevel, N. C. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk-Treasurer i .Buie's Creek, N. C. 



Next session meets at Piney Grove Church, Wednesday, 9:30 A. M., 
November 4, 1925. 

Introductory Sermon — W. R. Beach, Duke, N. C. Alternate — H. M. 
Stroup, BroaoVay, N. C. 



Goldsborq, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 

1924 



MINUTES 



OP THR 



Forty-Ninth Annual Session 



OF THE 



LITTLE RIVER 

Baptist Association. 



HELD WITH 



Broadway Baptist Church, 

October 28, 29 and 30, 1924 



J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator i Dunn, N. C. 

J. W. BYRD, Vice-Moderator Bunnlevel, N. C. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk-Treasurer 1 Buie's Creek, N. C. 



I 



Next session meets at Piney Grove Church, Wednesday, 9:30 A. M., 
November 4, 1925. 

Introductory Sermon — W. R. Beach, Duke, N, C, Alternate — H. M, 
S-troup, BroadVay, N. C. 



k 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 

1924 



ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

J. D. Betts Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

W. R. Beach ! Duke, N. C. 

J, A. Campbell Bule's Creek, N. C. 

W. C. Dowd I Manchester, N. C. 

B. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

A. C. McCall 1 R. P. D. No. 1, Duke, N. C. 

S*. C. Page R. F. D. No. 4, Dunn, N C. 

W. M. Page ! Buie's Creek, N. C. 

H. M. Stroup. Broadway, N. C, 

B. Townsend i Buie's Creek, N. C. 

NON-RESIDENT PASTORS. 

R. E. Atkins ; R. F. D., Raleigh, N. C. 

J. S. Farmer i Raleigh, N. C. 

J. L. Martin Fuquay S'prings, N. C, 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD. 

L. H. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

B. P. Gentry ; Lillington, N. C. 

Dr. C. D. Bain Dunn, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

J. M. Byrd C. W. Matthews C. W. Flowers 

J. W. Byrd H. Y. Smith J. C. Clifford. 

J. A. Campbell 



ASSOCIATION AL REPRESENTATIVES. 

State Missions i J. C. Clifford 

Home Missions A. C. McCall 

Foreign Missions i. . . . H. M. Stroup 



TRUSTEES BUIE'S CREEK ACADEMY, INCORPORATED. 

Time Expiring 1925— J. A. Gates, Z. J. Womack, B. P. Gentry, J. M. Byrd. 
Time Expiring 1926— E. H. Ballentine, C. H. Norris, D. H. Center, P. F. Pope. 
Time Expiring 1927 — A. Parrish, B. P. Marshbanks, J. E. Lanier, Fred N. Day. 
Time Expiring 1928 — J. C. Clifford, R. G. Taylor, G. F. Pope, J. W. Byrd. 
Time Expiring 1929— J. A. Campbell, Dr. H. C. Roberts, Z. T. Kivett, B, 
Townsend. 



^ 



ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

J. D. Betts Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

W. R. Beach. . . j Duke, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

W. C. Dowd I Manchester, N. C. 

E. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

A. C. McCall 1 R. P. D. No. 1, Duke, N. C. 

S". C. Page R. F. D. No. 4, Dunn, N C. 

W. M. Page ' Buie's Creek, N. C. 

H. M. Stroup . Broadway, N. C, 

B. Townsend i Buie's Creek, N. C. 

NON-RESIDENT PASTORS. 

R. E. Atkins ; R. F. D., Raleigh, N. C. 

J. S. Farmer i Raleigh, N. C. 

J. L. Martin .Fuquay S'prings, N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD. 

L. H. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

B. P. Gentry : Lillington, N. C. 

Dr. C, D. Baini Dunn, N. C. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

J. M. Byrd C. W. Matthews C. W. Flowers 

J. W. Byrd H. Y. Smith J. C. Clifford. 

J. A. Campbell 



ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES. 

State Missions i J. C. Clifford 

Home Missions A. C. McCall 

Foreign Missions , i. . . . H. M. Stroup 



TRUSTEES BUIE'S CREEK ACADEMY, INCORPORATED. 

Time Expiring 1925 — J. A. Gates, Z. J. Womack, B. P. Gentry, J. M. Byrd. 
Time Expiring 1926— E. H. Ballentine, C. H. Norris, D. H. Senter, P. F. Pope. 
Time Expiring 1927 — A. Parrish, B. P. Marshbanks, J. E. Lanier, Fred N. Day. 
Time Expiring 1928 — J. C. Clifford, R. G. Taylor, G. F. Pope, J. W. Byrd. 
-Time Expiring 1929— J. A. Campbell, Dr. H. C. Roberts, Z. T. Kivett, B, 
Townsend. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Broadway, IST. C, 
October 28, 7:00 P. M., 1924. 
The Little Eiver Baptist Association met in its forty-ninth annual 
session as above. The introductory sermon was preached by Rev. E. 
]^. Johnson, pastor of the Dnnn Baptist Church. 

Upon motion, the enrollment of delegates and organization of the 
body was deferred until to-morrow's session. 

Wednesday, October 29, 9 :30 A. M. 

Pastor A. C. McCall conducts the devotional exercises. Delegates 
are enrolled. The majority of the, churches being represented, on 
motion, the body proceedsi to the election of officers for thci ensuing 
year, resulting as follows : 

Moderator— J. C. Clifford; yice-Moderator, J. W. Byrd; Clerk- 
Treasurer, J. A. Campbell. 

The following visiting brethren report and are welcomed : Rev. R. 
H. Herring, Sandy Creek Association ; Dr. M. L. Kesler, representa- 
tive of the Baptist Orphanage ; Dr. J. R. Jester, Pilot Mountain Asso- 
ciation; Bro. H. S. Cox, Bro. W. I. Brooks, Mrs. W. M. Rogers, Mrs. 
Y. C. Hunt, and Mrs, W. O. Yarboro, of the Sandy Creek Association. 

DELEGATES AND VISITORS. 

Angler — C. W. Flowers, William Morgan, Mrs, William Morgan, Miss Ada 
Overby. 

Antioch— W. W. McLean, W. J. Brown, D. G. Patterson, J. E. Davis, J. 
R. Davis. 

Baptist Chapel — A. L. Smith, John T. Thomas. 

Baptist Grove — J. W. Walls, A. L. Baiighcom. 

Broadway — C. E. Thomas, Mrs. W. B. Thomas, A. B. Kelly, W. M. Thomas, 
Henry Thomas, Nina Mae S'teed, George L. Stone, H. M. Stroup, A. P.Thomas. 

Buie's Creek — J. A. Campbell, B. Townsend, Mrs. B. Townsend, J. F. 
Blackman. 

Chalybeate Springs — D. H. Senter, W. J. Norris. 

Coats — Irbin Smith, Mrs. Irbin Smith, Jesse H. Parrish, A. D. Williams, 
Miss Mattie Bain, Miss Bettie Williams, J. M. Byrd. 

Cumberland Union — A. F. Johnson, Jesse Weathers, T. B. Lanier. 

Duke— W. C. Stone, M. C. Brown, Mrs. W. C. Stone, C. H. Avery, Mrs. 
W. R. Beach, W. R. Beach 

Dunn — Elbert N. Johnson, J. A. McLeod, J. C. Clifford'. 

Friendship — Mrs. L. A. Bethune, F. J. Bethune, Mrs. J. Herbert Byrd, Mrs. 
F. J. Bethune, J. Herbert Byrd, C. M. Allen, Mrs. C. M. Allen, J. W. Byrd. 

Holly Springs — Miss Annie Buchanan, Miss Myrtle Thomas, Miss Lela 



6 FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Baker, H. Y. Smith, D. J. Patterson, M. J. Thomas, W. J. Wilson, Mrs. H. Y. 
S'mith, Earlie Thomas, Mrs. D. J. Patterson 

Kennebec — Pauline G. Olive, Florine Olive, M. T. Olive, Barrett Adams, 
Earl Ennis. 

Lillington — Mrs. J. G. Layton, B. P. Gentry, W. F. Hockaday, A. M. STiaw, 
Henderson Steele. 

Macedonia^ — J. C. Smith, A. S. Austin. 

Neill's Creek — Harvey Morgan, Carlie Butts. 

Oak Grove — L. J. Turlington, Miss Lina Turlington. 

Piney Grove — W. L. Norris, Mrs. I. L. Howell, I. L Howell, Mrs. John C. 
Adcock, Mrs. S. B. Adcock, B. M. Cooper, Daniel Hair, Duke Howard, Arthur 
Champion, Mrs. H. R. Hare, Mrs. Clara Howard. 

Rawles— Mrs. J. D. Betts, J. D. Betts. 

S'wann — Miss Bessie Wilson, B. M. Wilson, George Graham, Miss Bettie 
Graham, Miss Alberta Graham, Miss Mary Graham, Mrs. O. C. Douglass, C. 
R. Graham, D. A. Graham, M. S". Godfrey. 

Visitors — W. I. Brooks, H. S. Cox, Rev. R. H. Herring, Mrs. G. C. Hunt, 
Dr. J. R. Jester, Dr. M. L, Kesler, Rev. L. C. Lee, Mrs. L. C. Lee, Frank Lee, 
D. E. Matthews, Rev. J. A. McMillan, Perry Morgan, Mrs. Wm. Rogers, Mrs. 
W. O. Yarboro. 

The following programme is adopted allowing such changes to be 
made from time to time as the body may deem best : 

TUESDAY, OCTOGER 28TH. 

7:00 P.M.— Devotional. 

7:30 P.M. — Organization. 

7:45 P.M. — Annual Sermon — Elbert N. Johnson. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29TH. 

9:30 A.M.— Devotional. 
10:00 A.M. — Baptist Periodicals — ^Henderson Steele, and J. S". Farmer. 
10:30 A.M.— Missions. 

State Missions Report — C. D. Bain. 

Home Missions Report — H, Y. Smith. 

Foreign Missions Report — Miss Mattie Bain. 
10:45 A.M.— Completion or 75-Million Program- A. C. McCall, J. C. Clifford, 

E. N. Johnson. 

Dinner. 
1:30 P.M.— Devotional. 
1:45 P.M. — Miscellaneous Business. 
2:00 P.M. — The 1925 Program — Report by J. A. Campbell, and ao'dress by 

J. R. Jester, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
7:00 P.M. — Devotional. 
7:30 P.M. — Buie's Creek Academy — Report by J. A. Campbell. Report on 

Education — B. P. Gentry, B. P. Marshbanks, J. C. Clifford. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION. 7 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30TH. 

9:30 A.M.— Devotional. 
10-00 A.M.— Ministerial Relief— A. M. Shaw, R. G. Taylor. 
10:30 A.M.— Orphanage — J. D. Betts, B. F. McLeod. 

11 : 00 A.M.— B. Y. P. U. — C. W. Flowers, B. M. Shacklette, and Perry Morgan. 
11:30 A.M.— Sunday Schools— B. P. Gentry, John Allen McLeod. 
Dinner. 

1 : 30 P.M. — Devotional. 

1:45 P.M. — Miscellaneous Business. 

2:00 P.M. — Woman's Work — Mrs. B. Townsend, L. L. Levinson. 

2:30 P.M. — Temperance — W. M. Thomas, J. M. Byrd. 

3:00 P.M.— Obituaries— J. W. Byrd. 

2:30 P.M.— Report of Committees and Miscellaneous Business. 

J. C. CLIFFORD, for CommHtee. 

On motion, Dr. M. L. Kesler is invited to discuss the subject of the 
Orphanage, which he does. Bro-. Henderson Steele, an Orphanage 
product, also speaks on the subject. 

The report on State Missions is read by the Clerk for Dr. C. D. 
Bain, writer of the report. , 

Miss Mattie Bain reads the report on ForeigTi Missions. 

On motion to adopt, the reports are spoken to by Eevs. A. C. Mc- 
Call and E. 'N. Johnson. 

Inas.much as the subject of State Missions embrace all work done 
in Associational Missions, on motion, the subject of Associational Mis- 
sions is dropped from the list of subjects for reports. 

On motion, the Association adjourns one hour for dinner. 

Benediction by Dr. J. R. Jester. 



AFTERT^OOI^ SESSION. 

After devotional exercises, conducted by Evangelist B. Townsend, 
the Moderator appoints Brethren C. W. Flowers, T. B. Lanier, and 
D. H. Senter as committee to nominate the Executive Board, Sunday 
School Board, delegates to the Conventions, and to recommend place 
fcr the next Association and Union meeting. 

The question of the removal of the Juniper Springs Church from 
its o"'d place of worship to Broadway had caused a division in the 
church and each body had sent delegates to the Associatl^r. 

On motion, a committee consisting of Moderator J. C. Clifford, 
J. W. Byrd, H. Y. Smith and C. W. Flowers is appointed to hear 
the matter from both sides, with request to report to the night session 
of this body their findings in the matter. 



'8 FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Dr. J. R. Jester then delivers an address on the 75-Million Cam- 
paign and our 1925 programme. 

On motion, the Association adjourns until 7 :30 to-night. 

Before adjournment Eev. J. A. McMillan, representing the subject 
of Christian Education, is recognized and welcomed. 

OTGHT SESSION. 

Devotional exercises are conducted by Rev. E. N. Johnson who 
reads part of Hebrews twelfth chapter. 

The Committee on E'ominations make their report as follows : 

Executive Board — J. W. ByrcJ, J. M. Byrd, C. W. Flowers, C. W. Matiliews, 
H. Y. S'mith, J. C. Clifford and J. A. Campbell. 

Sunday School Board — L. H. Campbell, B. P. Gentry, Dr. C. D. Bain. 
State Mission Representative — J. C. Clifford. 
Home Mission Representative — A. C. McCall. 
Foreign Mission Representative — H. M. Stroup. 
. Delegate to State Convention — W. R. Beach. 
Delegate to S'outhern Convention — E. N. Johnson. 

Bro. J. C. Clifford reports for the committee appointed to investi- 
gate the Broadway-Juniper Springs matter. 

REPORT ON JUNIPER S'PRINGS CHURCH. 

We, your Committee appointed by the Association, with respect to the 
seating of rival delegations from Juniper Springs Church, or Broadway 
Church, ask leave to make the following report: 

We met during the session of the Association and organized by electing 
J. C. Clifford, Chairman of the Committee, and thereupon notice was given 
to the two delegations to appear with any witnesses either party might 
desire before the Committee, and at the time and place designated for such 
meeting, representatives of both factions were present. 

We find from evidence adduced before us the following facts: 

1. On February 22nd, 1923, the Board of Deacons of Juniper Springs 
Church, one of the mem,ber Churches of this Associatioin, adopted a reso- 
lution recommending the erection of a new Church Building, at Broadway, 
and recommend'ing that the Church take action thereon at its conference to 
be held in March. On April 1st, 1923, a conference of the Church regularly 
called and organized with the Paster as Moderator, adopted a resolution 
approving the action of the Board of Deacons by a vote of thirty-seven in 
favor of building the new Church, and fourteen against. 

2. Thereupon the Church proceeded with its new building in Broadway 
and continued to occupy the old Church until this was completed, moving 
into the new Church about the beginning of the year, 1924. 

3. That on the 1st S'und'ay in March, 1924, the Church in regular confer- 



LITTLE RIVER AS'SOCIATION. S 

ence adopted a resolution changing the name of the Church from Juniper 
Springs Baptist Church to Broadway Baptist Church. 

4. That after the Church had determined to build a new Church at 
Broadway with a view of removing its place of meeting to the new Church 
certain members of the Church, without notice to the Pastor and' without 
notice to the full membership undertook to organize a Church conference 
and to rescind the action of the Church in determining a removal of its 
location to Broadway and a change of its name and underook without his 
presence, and without notice to the full membership to discharge their Pastor 
and' to elect a new one, or a Pastoral supply. 

5. Your Committee is of the opinion that the Church was fully within 
its rights in erecting a new Church at Broadway and the removal of its place 
of worship to this new building and to change the name of the Church from' 
Juniper Springs to that of Broadway, and that its action was regular, valid 
and according to Baptist usage in both . that the action of a part of the 
Church members in its attempt to rescind this action of the Church was and 
is a nullity. 

6. We, therefore recommend that the Church heretofore carried upon the 
rolls of our Association as Juniper Springs, be henceforth carried on said 
rolls at Broadway Baptist Church, and that the delegation sent by the 
Broadway Baptist Church to this session of the Association be seated* as dele- 
gates to this body. Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. CLIFFORD, Chairman. 

H. Y. CMITH, 

J. W. BYRD, 

C. M. FLOWERS, Committee. 

Oil motion, all these reports are adopted nnanimously. 

Bro. B. P. Gentry reads the report on Edn cation. On motion to 
adopt, Rev. J. A. McMillan delivers an address on the subject. The 
subject is further discnssed bv "Rev. E. .^NT. Johnson and Moderator 
Clifford. 

On motion the Association adjourns until to-morrow 9 :.'U) A. M. 

THURSDAY MORISTI^tg. 

November 30. 

T3evotional exercises are conducted by Evangelist B. Tovnsend. 
The Moderator and Vice-Moderator both being absent, on motion, 
Rev. B. TovTisend is elected to preside over the meeting. 

Visiting brethren are invited. Bro. Perry Morgan, representing 
the State B. Y. P. U., Rev. L. C. Lee and Bro. D. E. IMatthews from 
the Sandy Creek Association are welcomed. 

fT. A. Campbell makes the report on Bnie's Creek Academy and 
discusses the report. 



10 FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

The report on Aged Ministers, after being read, is discussed by J. 
A. Campbell and E. !N^. Johnson. 

Orphanage report is adopted, having been discussed yesterday. 

Report on Periodicals is read and adopted. 

Bro. C. W. Flowers reads the report on B. Y. P. U. and is adopted 
after discussion by Bro. Morgan. 

The report on Sunday Schools is discussed by Bro. J. A. McLeod 
and, on motion, is adopted. 

Bev. E. X. Johnson moves that a vote of thanks be extended to 
tb:' Broadway church and community for providing such unbounded 
hos]utality for this gathering, which was heartily adopted. 

The report on Temperance is discussed by Bro. J. M. Byrd and, 
on motion, is adopted. 

The report on Woman's Work is read and after discussion is 
adopted. 

There being no further Imsiness, on motion, the Association ad- 
journs to meet next vear at Piney Grove. 

B. TOWISTSE^D, 
Moderator Pro Tem. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk. 



REPORTS FOR 1925— SEMI-CENTENNIAL SESSION. 

Order of Business — J. A. Campbell, J. C. Clifford. 
Baptist Literature — W. M. Thomas, D. H. Senter. 
State Missions— Dr. C. D. Bain, A. C. McCall. 
Home Missions— B. P. Gentry, J. S. Farmer. 
Foreign Missions — Mrs. J. G. Layton, W. R. Beach. 
Education — Mrs. W. R. Beach, E. N. Johnson. 
Aged Ministers — J. McD. Parker, C, W. Flowers. 
Orphanage — Henderson Steele, J. M. Byrd. 
Temperance — J. D. Betts, R. E. Atkins. 
Woman's Work — Miss Mattie Bain, H. M. Stroup. 
Sunday Schools — William Morgan, C. T. Matthews. 
Buie's Creek Academy — J. A. Campbell, B. P. McLeod. 
Obituaries — H. Y. S'mith, General Discussion. 
B. Y. P. U.— Mrs. Dr. C. D. Bain, M. M. Jernigan. 



LITTLE RIVER AS'SOCIATION. 11 



REPORT OF TRBAS'URER FOR 1923. 

DR. 

Received for Minutes and Clerk $ 107 . 95 

Received for Convention objects 1,025 . 28 

Total amount received' $ 1,133.23 

CR. 

Paid for Minutes and Clerk $ 107 . 95 

Paid Treasurer of Convention i 1025 . 28 

Total amount paid out i $ 1133.23 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Treasurer. 

REPORT ON 1925 PROGRAM. 

Our Committee of the State Convention has met and, after discussion of 
needs, the report recommends that the apportionment for our churches for 
the year 1925 be one-fourth of what the churches have paid for the past four 
years. This would mean for the churches in our Association as follows: 

Angier i. . $ 225 . 00 Friendship 345 . 00 

Antioch 15.00 Holly Springs ' 850.00 

Baptist Chapel 75.00 Kennebec 50.00 

Baptist Grove 80.00 Lillington i 390.00 

Bethel i 80 . 00 Macedonia 65 . 00 

Broadway 350.00 Neill's Creek i 165.00 

Buie's Creek . .i 1875 . 00 Oak Grove 25 . 00 

Chalybeate Springs 1115.00 Piney Grove i 305.00 

Coats 800.00 Rawls 30.00 

Cumberland-Union .... 295 . 00 ISwann's S',tajtion . .i 265 . 00 

Duke 1 450 . 00 



Dunn 4100.00 Total $127Ff^. 

REPORT OF BUIE'S' CREEK ACADEMY, INCORPORATED. 

Buie's Creek Acad'emy reports for the scholastic year 1923--1924 an enroll- 
ment of 612. The fall term of 1924, closing thirty-seven years of history, 
indicates that we shall have the largest attendance in our history, the enroll- 
ment being larger than for same date of last year by fifty. Thirty-one min- 
isterial students have been enrolled, eleven of whom are married and have 
their families here. Ten young women have indicated their purpose t« 
give their life to mission work and are preparing for their life work. 

The spiritual life of the school is fine. Dr. John R. Jester, pastor of «i« 
First Baptist Church, Winston-Salem is now concluding a series of meeting* 
with us. (The meeting closed November 6, with forty-one baptized into the 



12 FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

fellowship of our Buie's Creek Church, making 1,068 baptized into this 
church since the year 1900, during the present pastorate.) 

Since our report one year ago the boy's dormitory has been completed, 
the Carrie Rich Library building has been completed and* the gymnasium 
building has been built. This last named building will be used temporarily 
for our auditorium and furnishes four class rooms. This building cost more 
than $16,000, the library building $45,000 and the boy's dormitory $35,000, 
making nearly $100,000 added to our equipment. This property is owned 
by the denomination and is held by the trustees for carrying out the Lord's 
work in all the earth. 

In order to carry forward the work another dormitory for boys and anoth- 
er for girls is greatly needed. Additional teaching room is needed. Both of 
these needs are a necessity if the school is to grow and do its best work. 

It is recommended that J. A. Campbell, Dr. H. C. Roberts, Z. T Kivett 
and B. Townseno', whose term of office expires at this session of the Asso- 
ciation, be appointed to succeed themselves. Yours truly, 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Committee. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

In trying to carry out the commission of our Lord, "Go preach the gospel 
to every creature," we have three divisions of our mission work. State 
Missions, Home Missions, and Foreign Missions. The Home Mission Board 
is located in Atlanta, Ga., with Dr. B. D. Gray as the Corresponding Secre- 
tary. This Board has its work divided under five different heads, namely: 
Co-operative Missions, Evangelism) and Enlistment, Mountain Mission 
S'chools, Foreigners, Indians and Negroes, Cuba and Panama. 

Throughout the year the blessings of God have been upon our work in a 
remarkable way. Necessary retrenchment in our forces has affected the work 
somewhat, but compensation in a large measure has been found in the un- 
unwonted favor of God upon the labors of our missionaries and evangelists. 
The scriptures have been fulfilled that they who go forth weeping are com- 
ing back rejoicing, bringing their sheaves with them. 

The Board employed during the year one thousand two hundred and fifty 
workers. They delivered 152,133 sermons and a(?dresses, received by baptism 
29,930, cared for 43 schools with 252 teachers 6263 students. In these schools 
there were 231 ministerial students. These workers found 3,277 volunteers 
for special work in the work of the Lord. 

In every department of our work there is need for enlargement. The 
calls are many and heart-searching from every where. A great increase in 
our resources must come if we meet these opening fields and crying needs. 

We thank God for all that has been accomplished during the past year, and 
give Him the glory for it all, praying that He may lead his people to pay 
their pledges on the 75-Million Campaign, and pledge in a worthy way for 
the new programme so that the work may be carried on in a larger and more 
successful way, for the salvation of the lost in our home land. 

H. T. SMITH, Committee. 



LITTLE RIVER AS'SOCIATION. 13 



REPORT ON WOMAN'S; WORK. 



The Woman's Missionary Union has a steady and. glorious growth since 
they made their first report to the State Convention 37 years ago. 

The Union has not only grown in contribution but they have year by year 
increased in knowledge in our missionary work and along all our denomina, 
tional lines. 

The Union has always done its work as an auxiliary organization under 
the direction of our State Board of Missions. The loyalty of the Union has 
never been questioned by the local church or disloyal to any program of our 
denominational work. Their loyalty and d'evotion to the cause of Christ 
and the denominational program is shown by the amount they have paid to 
the 75 Million Campaign and the amount they shall take of the 1925 program. 

First: Your committee would ask every pastor and church in the Little 
River Association to co-operate with our superintendent, Miss Mattie Bain, 
of Coats, N. C, in carrying out the 1925 program. 

Second : By urging the need of special seasons of prayer and reading of ouj* 
Mission Periodicals, namely, Royal Service, Home and Foreign Fields and! 
our own denominational paper, the Biblical Record'er. Your committee also 
ask that our superintendent be asked to add to this report the amount asked 
of each society for the year of 1925 and the program as far as possible for 
the information of the societies. Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. B. TOWNSEND. 



REPORT ON FOREIGN MIS'SIONS. 

The commission given by Jesus to the early disciples, as found in Acts 1:8, 
had a definite program, in which all mission fields were included. Foreign 
Missions had its place in the heart of the Master when He said, "And unto 
the uttermost part of the earth." First they were to receive power, then 
witness for Him. 

In the d'ays of Carey, Judson and Rice the christian people were slow in 
realizing the condition and need of the heathen but these men had received 
the power to go forth as true witnesses for Christ. The coming of Judson 
and Rice to the Baptist belief and church was the event required to awaken 
the energies of the Baptists in America. The work of organizing mission 
societies took on new life and in 1845 the Southern Baptist Convention was 
organized with the Foreign Mission Board located at Richmond, Dr. James 
B. Taylor, Corresponding Secretary. Ur^der the leadership of Drs. Taylor, 
Tupper, Willingham and Love the work of Foreign Missions has grown along 
all lines of mission activities, in contributions from' $11,689.05 in 1845 to 
$1,912,770.08 in 1923. The selection of fields with open doors and the secur- 
ing of missionaries to occupy them was a difficult task. Now every door in 
the world is^pen and this year 80 missionaries were turned back from For- 
eign Mission work on account of an empty treasury. God has wonderfully 
blessed the work of Foreign Missions through all these years. The mis- 
sionaries, few in number compared with the need, have made a splendid 



14 FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

record. New fields in Europe, Palestine and other countries have been en- 
tered with soul thrilling reports of the way these people accept the gospel. 
Then there comes a distressing cry, for more helpers aniJ equipment, that 
makes one long to be able to supply all the needs. "Every cloud has a silver 
lining," so every need and sorrow has joy and peace in store for these who 
send relief. 544 American Missionaries and 2,494 native workers are labor- 
ing in 17 foreign countries and as a result of their work 12,856 baptisms 
were reported last year. 1,095 churches with 111,872 members report 1,511 
S'unday schools with 76,504 pupils. 35,106 boys and girls are receiving train- 
ing in 1860 Mission schools while the 9 Hospitals have been able to treat 
70,416 persons. 

Southern Baptists feel proud of this record of growth but listen to the 
plea for reinforcements as it comes today: 229 Additional American Mission- 
aries and 1,000 native workers are needed to seize immediate opportunities 
in countries already entered. $4,046,000.00 is needed for 1925 for all purposes. 

Every Baptist should consider it a privilege to help bring this to pass 
during the coming year but first we must receive power then go and wit- 
ness. The power, to accomplish the task, will surely come if men and 
women will sufficiently inform themselves by reading the Bible, Home and 
Foreign Fields, mission books, tracts sent free by Foreign Mission Board, 
and Biblical Recorder; Go back to the Cross, renew the promises made to 
God then pray for the work and workers; give time and money in a definite, 
systematic way. The missionaries are counting on Southern Baptists keep- 
ing faith with God. 

Do you wish to have overflowing blessings from heaven? If you do 

"Give as you would if an angel 
Awaited your gift at the dooi-. 
Give as you would if tomorrow 
Found you where giving is o'er. 
Give as you would to the Masier* 
If you met His searching look. 
Give as you would of your substance 
If His hand your offering took '" 

MATTIE BAIN, Committee. 



REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

The light that shines the farthest, shines the brightest back at home. S'tate 
Missions is the home light of our great world-wide mission program. In 
proportion to the way that light is kept trimmed and burning, by enlighten- 
ing and enlisting our own people, will its rays reach to "Samaria and unto 
the uttermost part of the earth." 

A GLANCE BACKWARD. 

Organization. — The Baptist S'tate Convention was conceived in the con- 
secrated brain of Martin Ross. The Convention was organize(? at Green- 



LITTLE RIVER AS'SOCIATION. 15 

ville, N. C, on March 26, 1830. A "Board of Directors" was appointed at 
the first meeting. This corresponds to cur State Mission Board today. 

Growth, — When the Convention was organized there were 15,000 Baptists 
in the State white and colored. Now there are 340,000 white Baptists and 
230,000 negro Baptists making a total of 570,000 out of a population of 3,- 
500,000. We have baptized 100,000 into our churches since 1919. There 
are 64 Associations, 2,263 churches, 2,175 Sunday schools, 1,365 B. Y. P. U.'s 
and 2,075 Woman's Missionary Societies and Auxiliary Societies. There ar^ 
1,300 churches without a B. Y. P. U. and about the same number without a 
W. M. S. organization. There are 1,998 country churches in the S'tate and 
between 1,400 and 1,500 with just a little one-room church house. We are 
rapid'ly building new churches and Sunday school equipment and we can 
see from the above that we have a long way to go. 

A VIEW OF THE, PRESENT. 

Department of Work. — Just as in any big business enterprise there is a 
division of responsibility which makes for efficiency, so our work is organ- 
ized in departments with a capable worker, who is assisted by associates, 
at the head of each department. The departments are: 

Evangelism — Rev. H. T. Stevens, two associates. 

Enlistment — Rev. A. C. Hamby, three associates. 

B. Y. P. U. — Perry Morgan, two associates. 

Sunday S'chools — E. L. Middleton, three associates. 

Woman's Missionary Union — Miss Mary Warren, two associates. 

Stewardship — Rev. W. M. Gilmore. 

We have three student workers. We have 300 churches and mission sta- 
tions being served by 180 missionaries. 

Financial Achievements — We have made great progress in our contribu- 
tions during the past few years. During the four and one-half years of the 
75-Million Campaign we have paid to Missions, Benevolence and Ed\ication 
each year as follows: 

First Year . .i $1,026,629 . 54 

Second Year 1,281,742 . 58 

Third Year i 950,443 . 27 

Fourth Year i 795,441 . 06 

From December 1st, 1923, to May 1st, 1924 i 403,315.88 

Undivided Balance i 32,039 . 48 

S'ent direct to Louisville Training School 21,302.06 

Grand Total i $4,511,013 . 81 

State Missions gets about 13 cents out of the dollar. This is far too little 
for our great State Mission Program. In the 1925 program we are to get 
20 cents out of every dollar given. With this increase we ought to enlarge 
our State Mission Program. 



16 FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE. 

Immediate Needs — ^We have a large debt on the running account of State 
Missions. We get only 13 cents out of the dollar in the 75-Million Cam- 
paign. We face a terrible debt unless our people pay their pledges. 

Then our building fund is simply overwhelmed* with applications. There 
are more than thirty-five applications on file in the office that we have 
not been able to touch. We need so much a larger amount for our building 
fund. We could use a quarter of a million dollars next year and then not 
have enough. 

We need to enlarge every department of our work and we must enlarge 
and go forward or we shall lose our great opportunity. A crisis is upon us 
and we must meet it like men and women who love and fear the Lord. 

Solution — A proper understanding and* practice of tTie fundamental doc- 
trine of Stewardship by North Carolina Baptists would solve every one of 
our problems. Hence great emphasis is being placed on the study of the 
Bible teaching on this subject. 

Many of our pastors have taught classes in Cook's book "S'tewardship and 
Missions," and have preached special sermons on the subject with good re- 
sults. One of our great objectives is to get every North Carolina Baptist 
to realize that he is a steward of his possessions and not the owner, that 
one day he must stand before the real Owner and give an account of how he 
has used everything that has been entrusted to him, to induce all of our 
Baptist churches to become orthod'ox in practicing the simple New Testa- 
ment plan of financing the Kingdom of God. "Upon the first day of the week 
let every one of you lay by him in store as God has prospere(? him." This 
is one of our most serious problems. C. D. BAIN. 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

This is a day of education. Large and growing expenditures are being 
made in an effort to educate our people. Our State schools are all filled 
to overflowing. Private and denominational schools are enlarging their 
plants, provid^ing endowment funds and doing all they can to meet the in- 
creasec? attendance. 

These conditions bring to Christian people everywhere responsibility and 
opportunity. On one occasion a speaker said that our school houses are 
our light houses. If these light houses are to function properly there must 
be the proper mixture of intelligence and christian religion. To bring about 
such a condition requires skillful planning and continuous efforts. Large 
numbers of our young people leave the home church and the fire side of their 
christian parents for state schools. They go to walk alone, to face a new 
life with pitfalls deep and plentiful. A powerful Christian organization 
should touch these lives to steady and strengthen them 

We have the private and church schools. Sometimes we wonder about the 
future of these when in competition with the State. But when we realize; 
that Christian education is the heart, the nerve center, of any true system 
of education then we need have no fear for the future of these schools. They 



LITTLE RIVER AS'SOCIATION. 17 

have a wonderfully important place in our educational life and deserve 
strong support from our people. 

May we suggest that in our State schools are large numbers of Baptist 
boys and girls needing help and guidance from the denomination. We are 
to build a great Meredith and the bonds are waiting to be purchased. We 
rejoice in, the continued growth of Wake Forest and bespeak for it active 
and loyal support from every Baptist. 

We are exceedingly fortunate in having in our Association one of the 
best of our preparatory schools. If we will properly support its strong and 
capable leadership we are unable to predict the degree of success that will 
be attained as the years pass. 

We commend to you the field of Christian education as an opportunity for 
service which should claim and demand the united support of our christian 
workers. Respectfully submitted, 

B. P. GENTRY, Commrrtee. 



REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

For thirty-nine years the Baptist people of North Carolina have been 
providing for orphan children in a definite way. The plan established by 
Dr. John H. Mills at the beginning has been continued through the years. 
We know that every family in the beginning is small, so was the orphanage 
but it has become to be a large family with some of them at Thomasville 
and some of them at the Kennedy home. Also provision is made for mothers 
to take, care of some of them in their own . homes and those children are 
taught to work as well as go to school. And' as we look at the many families 
at those places and the great host of children we know that the cost of 
feeding and clothing and training of them is great. I think that we all 
should help in this great work and may I urge that we all do our part. And 
also that the Charity and Children he read in every home. 

J. D. BETTS', Committee. 

REPORT ON AGED MINISTERS. 

It has come to pass in our modern civilization, that all corporations of any 
note, set aside a fund to take care of their employees, who have given their 
strength and life in faithful service, that they may not come to want in 
their declining years. 

Then why should not we, as Southern Baptists, set aside a fund' to take 
care of our aged ministers and their wives. We are one of the largest 
bodies in the world, whose wealth is estimated by the editor of ''The Man- 
ufacturers' Record" as fifteen billion with an income of fifteen hundred 
million. If we would tithe, as the Bible teaches us, we could raise one hun- 
dred and fifty million per year. 

Let us so plan to bring this about. By doing this we will show our ap- 
preciation of their services and help them to look forward to a serene old* 
age in this world and be met with this acclaim by our Heavenly Father 



18 FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL. SESSION 

"well done thou good and faithful servant, thou hast been faithful over a 
few things I will make thee ruler over many things." 

Respectfully submitted, A. M. SHAW. 

REPORT OF BAPTIST PERIODICALS. 

The Biblical Recorder, organ of the Baptist denomination in North Caro- 
lina, has a circulation, we are informed, of 22,500 copies. Of course, a cer- 
tain per centage of this circulation goes into other than Baptist homes. It 
would be interesting to know just what percentage of the Baptist homes 
are visited by The Recorder. Accurate figures as to this are not so easy 
to obtain; but here is a figure that is most remarkable indeed. We are 
told by the management of the Recorder that of the nine hundred' and fifty 
pastors in our denomination, only about two thirds of them, receive the 
Recorder. 

To be specific, there are three hund^red and twenty-seven Baptist pastors 
in North Carolina who do not subscribe to the official organ of the denomi- 
nation. Failure of the leader of the flock to fortify himself with first-hand 
information as to the denomination's welfare, however, does not in any way 
excuse any member of the flock, and it would further appear that there 
might be some cases wherein the flock could be more dutiful in preparing 
for the leader this great necessity for the denomination's upbuilding. We 
know of no instance in which the pastor of a church is receiving too much. 

We are also informed that between 1200 and 1500 Sunday S'chool superin- 
tendents and a like number of church clerks are not receiving the Recorder. 
It is certain that in a great many instances periodicals must force them- 
selves upon people who should in all reason subscribe without solicitation. 
Knowing this, we would urge upon Brother Farmer that he add a new 
vigor to his campaign for subscribers, for we feel that only through thorough 
information of the subject in hand can the Baptists of North Carolina gc 
forward with the great work undertaken. And we would also urge upon all 
of our members that they come to realize their personal responsibility in the 
Baptist work, and that they equip themselves with the information that 
only The Recorder can give them. 

Further, we would urge upon each and every Baptist of Little River Asso- 
ciation to see that this great messenger is invited into their homes in order 
that this field of work may be strengthened and we may each and all re- 
ceive an inspiration thereby to go forward to greater effort in the Master's- 
Kingdom. 

Charity and Children, most precious of the Master's tidings, should be 
received into a Baptist home — every Baptist home — with the same cordiality 
and with the same love that Jesus showed when he said "forbid them not." 
A Baptist home, and especially where there are children, should not feel 
itself complete without this little paper. HENDERSON STEELE. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST YOUNG PEOPLE'S UNION. 

The present Baptist Young People's Union in North Carolina was organ- 
ized in 1909. The first S'tate Convention was held' at Durham, 1910. Ten 



LITTLE RIVER AS'SOCIATION. 19 

unions were represented at this Convention. The last Convention was held 
in Wilmington in June, 1924, and was attended by more than sixteen hun- 
dred representatives. The B. Y. P. U. State Convention has grown to be 
the largest Baptist meeting held in the State. 

This work is fostered by the Baptist State Convention and the Sunday 
School Board of the S'outhern Baptist Convention. The State Mission Board 
has three whole time workers in the field. Their time is spent in general 
field work, such as conducting training schools and institutes, holding con* 
ventions, associational and* district rallies. Their services are obtainable for 
work in the city, town and country. 

There are 1400 B. Y. P. U. organizations in the State. In the Little River 
Association there are 24 churches. In these churches there are four Juniors, 
three Intermediates, and 21 Senior Unions. This shows that the B. Y. P. U. 
is rapidly growing, and soon every church will have as many B. Y. P. U.'s 
are are needed to develop all the young people in our churches. 

The B. Y. P. U. is the training agency of the Baptist denomination. Its 
object as taken from' the B. Y. P. U. Constitution "shall be the increased 
spirituality of the young christian, their training is essential to church ac- 
tivities, their edification in Scripture knowledge, their instruction in Bap- 
tist doctrine and history, and their enlistment in all forms of missionary 
endeavors through existing denominational organizations." The place of 
the B. Y. P. U. in our State program is one of enlistment, enlargement, and 
enlightenment. The B. Y. P. U. is educational. It has a curriculum of ten 
books, in aci'dition to the topics studied in the B. Y. P. U. Quarterly. These 
books treat upon such subjects as Stewardship, Church membership, Sun- 
day School and Church methods, Bible Study, Doctrines, Christian service, 
and Baptist history. 

Your committee recommend that all of our churches assign B. Y. P. U. as 
a church task, electing the officers, publicly installing them, recognizing them 
as church officers, calling upon them for reports, making them responsible 
to the church and supporting the work financially and with their sympathy 
and prayers. C. W. FLOWERS, Committee. 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

The temperance question in our Association is alarmJng. Young men as 
well as older ones are violating the law of the land. The temperance ques- 
tion is no more alarming with us than it is all over the country. Men are 
assuming to be a law to themselves. Even men in high political life are 
not regarding the law. The awful tragedy is the fact that mere boys, if 
they happen to have the price, can get the stuff. The whole thing is causing 
thoughtful people to wonder if we have gone at this thing in the right way. 
We seem to have substituted law for love, force for truth. 

"As a man thinketh in his heart, so is he." My firm conviction is we are 
putting the stress on the wrong side. 

Along with this alarming situation comes some comfort. Uncle Sam is 
beginning to arouse himself out of a long sleep and is beginning to take the 



20 FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

18th Amendment serious. Our Ju(Jges and Recorders are applying the law 
more harshly. The jury is being aroused to the seriousness of the situa- 
tion as they see their own boys going astray. In the main, there is a little 
gleam of light, some hope and encouragement. If Judge, jury, and witnesses 
would unite against this bad business and put it down for one generation, 
then we would be free from it forever. 

There remains one thing more to be added to the above and that is public 
sentiment. If one time we can get this powerful factor turned against the 
boot-leg business, it will be forced out of commission. Men are not per- 
suaded that liquor is wholly bad. The 18th AmencJment is not popular with 
some. They did not vote for it nor will they abide by it till forced* to do so. 
Yet, liquor is outlawed whether man likes it or not. 

I am heartily in favor of Home, Church and State doing all in their power 
to put a stop to this curse. Respectfully submitted, 

W. M. THOMAS. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

We have come to a day when we have to adjust our religious services to 
the taste of the folks or we have a hard time keeping the attendance in 
line. So many people seem to be developing a taste for things that lead 
them away from christian services that our pastors and Sunday school work- 
ers find it difficult to secure satisfactory results from their efforts. Often 
those in places of leadership hear the call to the fields of worldly joys and 
the cause suffers The rapid transit life we are living isn't making it 
easier to be a christian. New problems and greater difficulties must be 
faced by all parts of 'our church organization. The Sunday school fills such 
a big place in our christian work that its share of the duties of a new day 
becomes very large. 

It is gratifying to note that all of our churches have well organized Sun- 
day Schools kept open twelve months in the year. There must be steady 
anci? continuous efforts on the part of all christians if the Sunday school 
meets its responsibilities successfully. Our first duty is to train our young 
people and help lead them into the right way. Constant and strong influ- 
ences are everywhere pulling and driving them' away from truth and right- 
eousness. These S'unday schools make one of the greatest agencies we have 
to counteract the tendencies that i^oint into the wilderness. There are other 
duties. We should enlist the efforts of all available christians and help them 
to be stronger christians. We should seek to bring in those who are not 
christians and point to them the way into the kingdom. We sbould remem- 
ber the heathen, the sick, the widow and the orphan — every phase of our 
christian work shoul(? find a splendid response from the S'unday school. 

We commend this organization as one inviting and needing our best efforts. 
It indicates the growing qualities of any church. Let us take new courage 
and press harder through the Sunday school for those things taught us by 
the great Teacher who still leads us into the right way. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. P. GENTRY, Committee. 



Woman's Missionary Union. 



The Little River Woman's Missionary Union held its eighteenth annual 
meeting with the Friendship Baptist Church, September 4th, 1924. 

THURSDAY MORNING. 

The opening devotional was led by Mrs. F. D. Byrd. Roll called and report 
of Woman's Missionary Societies given. Recognition of pastors and visitors 
followed, four pastors and Miss Dorothy Kellam, our State Young People's 
Leadfer, being present all of whom we welcomed. From Miss Bain's report 
we realized that we had fallen far short of our duty during the past five years 
but that we had done many things worthy of mention. 

Mrs. W. R. Beach brought a splendid message on Mission Study. Miss 
Kellam told us about our mission magazines and Mrs. O. D. Lyon was asked 
to take subscriptions for all these during the day. After the appointment of 
committees Rev. E. N. Johnson brought us a message on Prayer which was 
truly a message from God. 

The meeting then adjourned until 1:45. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Devotional led by Miss Zula Rogers, special song by Miss Kellam. The 
reports of the young people's societies showed an increase in work with a 
greater (?etermination to be A-1 societies next year. 

Miss Kellam told us about the morning of our lives in such an interesting 
and beautiful manner that those who heard her can never forget the won- 
derful opportunities that come to the young people. Mrs. Nichols made plain 
the way of reaching the Standard by loving it until the needed work to ac- 
complish the task would be done. Mrs. Joel Layton introduced the Sun- 
bonnet Baby after which Miss Zula Rogers presented the Antioch Sunbonnet 
Baby that her band had dressed during th^ past year making her Ban(J A-1. 
Three of the Antioch societies made A-1 during the year this being the best 
record made by any church in the Association. Miss Ruth Jinks, who has 
charge of the Girls' Dormitory at Buie's Creek, in a few words showed how 
to enlist by attraction. Misses Margie Spence, Emily Roberson, Grace 
Thomas, Lessie Hill and Beulah O'Quinn gave us some interesting and help- 
ful talks on the work being done by our women and young people. 

The committee on nominations made the following report: Miss Mattie 
Bain, Superintendent; Mrs. Joel Layton, Young People's Leader; Mrs. W. R. 
Beach, Mission Study Chairman; Mrs. Virginia Ed*gerton, Personal Service 
Chairman and Miss Beulah O'Quinn, Secretary-Treasurer. 

The report was adopted. 

The report of the committee on time and place was also adopted and we 
meet with Piney Grove Baptist Church the last Thursday in August, 1925. 

MATTIE BAIN, Superintendent. 

MRS. J. L. PARKER, Secretary Protem. 



CHURCH DIRECTORY. 



CHURCH. 



PASTOR AND POSTOFPICE. 



CLERK AND POSTOFFIC] 



Angier 

Antioch 

Baptist Chapel 

Baptist Grove 

Bethel 

Broadway 

Buie's Creek ' ". 

Chalybeate Springs. . 

Coats 

Cumberland Union. . . 

Duke 

Dunn 

Friendship 

Holly Springs 

Kennebec 

Lillington 

Maeeddonia 

Neill's Creek 

Oak Grove 

Piney Grove , 

Rawles 

Swann's Station. ..'.*.*.". 



'A. 

lA. 
•iH 
. Fi 

iA. 

iH 

J. 

i.T. 

J. 
■IF. 
. W 
. F. 



S. G'illespie, Wake Forest 

C. McCall, Bunnlevel 

. M. Stroup, Broadway., 
■ed Womack, Wake Forest. 

C. McC'all, Duke 

M. Stroup, Broadwav 

A. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

S. Farmer, Raleigh 

A. Campbell. Bnie's rv(^ '- , 
G. Womack, Wake Forest.! 

R. Beach, Duke 

N. .Toll n sou, Dunn. 

C. McCall. Duke. R. "i . ^ '. ' " 

M. Stroup, Broadwav 

ed Womack, Wake Forest 

R. Beach. Duke 

IV Muckle, Wake Forest 

r. Mr-Call, Bunnlevel 

D Prttf^. Fu(niav Ppriir-s 
F. Atkins. Raleigh. R. 4... 

. M Page 

M «ti'Our), Bro-i(1w;iv 



C. W 

J R. 

J.' R. 

L. W. 

W. G. 

H. A. 

J. 

^' 

G I. Smith, Jr., Coats 

V. Lanier. Kipling 

J. Turlington, Duke , 

M. Lucas, Dunn 

M'cD. Parker, Bunnlevel 

Y. Smitli, Broadway 

F. Bond. Willow Springs... 
--- Steele. Lillington. .y 



Flowers, Angier 

Patterson, Lillington 

Howard, Jonc'^])oro 

Bridgers, Kipling. ........".* 

Flmore, Lin(l(^'i'. 

Thomas. Broadway 

F. Blackmail, Rule's Creek 

7. Norris, Chalybeate Springs 



C. 

J. 

J. 

H. 

W. 

Henderson 

J. C. Smith, Holly Springs. 

Carlie Robbs, Lillington 

^^ T, Reardon, Angier 

W. W. f^cawell. Fuquay Springs. 

C. T. Smith. Funuay Springs... 

D. A. Graham. .Tonesboro. R. 3. 



TABLE I— STATISTICAL. 



CHURCH. 



G.iins. 









r.ossps 



>. \>.o 



o aj 



J. Ij. Johnson, An.iiicM- 

J. R. Patterson. Lilliiigton 

J. R. Howard, Jonesl)oro 

L. W. Bridsers, Kiplin,^- 

G. A. Mattlunvs. Maiu-hoster. . . 
W. H. 'I'lioui-is, Broadway 

B. F McLeod, Buie s Creek 

W. J. Norris, Chalybeate Sprinj;s. 

Mattie Bain, Coats 

J. C. Hardee, 'Kipliiic; 

M. C. Brown. Duke 

C. D. Bain and H. B.Taylor.Dunn 
F. D. Byrd, Bunnlevel 

B. B. Wilson. Broadway 

J. P. Satterlield, Willow Sprin-s. 

Henderson Steele. Lillinji-ton 

J. C. Smith. Holly Sprini,-s 

D. D. Johnson. T-Hlinu-ton 

J. A. Betts. Lillington 

W. W. Sea well. Fumiay ^Toi^vs. 

C. T. Smith, Fnnnav Sprin 's . . . . 
M. S. Godfrey, Jonesboro, R. .S... 



Total 



1—8 
1—2 
2nd 
2nd 
1—3 
2—4 

3rd 

'^.th 

2—4 

Every 

2—4 

2—4 

4th 

1—3 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 

1st 

2nd 

3rd 



i$. 



7000 
1200 
2'i>:!0 
2132 
4!l0ii. 
2.")00(> 
-yi)00 
4000 
600 

GOO; ) 

77000 
6000 

.50(N) 
2000 
20O00 
2700 
2500 
1500 
250O 
1500 

20'; 10 



.001, 
.001 
.(HV. 

.ooj. 

(10| 
.01)]. 
.(M)i. 

.00!. 
.001 . 
.0')|. 
.001 
.OO'l. 
.00| 
.00'. 

.00! . 

.001 , 
.()0\. 
.0)1. 
.00', 
.00|. 
.001, 



>5(10 



25001 



10000 



25<X) 



8| 101 

I. 



1 

1 

ni i| 
401 .... I 
211. ...I 



201 131 2 
16| 35| . . . . 

2i 2 
2|.... 
1 



121 

01 

161 



51 


14 


31 


3 


151 


3 


15! 


2 


86| 


22 



I 

5)1. 

38 i, 
4| 
5|, 
51 
0! 

19! 



I 1 



31 
131 
...I 

2| 



121 
111 



4| 31 



212 

4 1 42!) 
, .1 99 
2 1 187 
II 102 
1| 208 
2 1 714 
1| 328 
2 1 2;i3 
..| 73 
.1 175 
567 
253 
305 
98 
98 
22« 
176 
101 
516 
83 
155 



2| 



1170632. <)')! 17.5001 3711 194| 11| 81 1531 -521 .37| 5,312 



TABLE II— FINANCIAL. 



Churches. 



Angler , 

Antioch 

Baptist Chapel 

Baptist Grove 

Bethel 

Broadway 

Bule's Creek 

Chalybeate Spring!: 

Coats 

Cumberland Union. 

Duke 

Dunn 

Friendship 

Holly Springs 

Kennebec 

Lillington 

Macedonia ' 

Neill's Creek 

Oak Grove 

Piney Grove 

Rawles 

Swann's Station... 
Total 



Local. 



Occ 









I 1 

1$ 626.001$ 

I 150.001. 
I 250.00. 



S; 



oo 



I 525 
I (H)0 
I 600 
I Mm 
200 
I 1<M)0 
I 8000, 
I 800, 
1 750, 
I 100, 
I 1000 
I 200, 
I 400, 
I 125 
I 467 
1 150, 
I 300 



.001 

.ooiior 

.00|. 
.801. 
.00|. 

.(;oi. 

.001312 

.001 

.001 

.001 

.001 

.001. 

.001. 

.00 . 

.651. 

.O'-N. 
.001 . 



15 



72.00|$ 

80.02! 528.7: 



).00 



.081 



26.00 
43.00 

55 .'66 

i66.'66| 

lOO.O')! 

30.001 
188.50 



28.50 

262.50 

4062.85 
86.75 



800. 001 4888.501 
04.201 82. .801 
54.201 1 



001 



I 

'.'.'.'.'.'.\ 
40.001 

.1 

53.001 
50.581 



15«.18l 

25.001 

285. OOi 

15.001 

8881.861 

4.001 
•I 



40.50 

300.00 



57.00 
170.08 
107.74 

242 .'68 

389.80 

00.01 

42.00 

io.i '66 

25.00 



187.50 



112443.051427.081 1872. 49114260. Of; ir^-^r, f 



30.17 



$ 115 

01 

9 

35 

14, 

107, 

192. 
53. 

148. 
12. 

824 . 

600 . 



.001 
.001 



.001 



5.00,$ 

8.001 

3.50! 

2.50i 
4.001 
" 001 



.001$ 



20 

85.001 Kt.OU 

82 

41 



:..50| 

.441 



68. 
86. 
40. 



05 
101 



85.001 



I 

45.001 



.<;o| 

.001 

...I 
.001 
001 

27] 
851 



471211 



7.501 

10.10' 

5.001 

5.00] 

25.001 

18.70i 

7.051 

4.161 

10.001 

4.001 

7.501 

4.001 

8.001 

2.001 

5.001 



286.30 
105.051 
120.251 
824.821 

"i.'ooi 

334.06' 



51 . 05' 

95.051 



48.801 
8.50.001 

7.251 



861. 
1604. 

226. 

347. 

280 
5068. 
1298. 
1030. 
1224. 

247. 
1859. 
9906. 
1133. 

898. 

139. 
1846. 

408. i 

725. 

184. 
4659. 

595. 

442. 



476.881156.011 1698.521 1mm. 



Chuivh 



TABLiE II— FINANClAI^CContinued.) 
Denominational. 



S-S, 



"v'w 






^Ci 



5S 
^ o 
-t-> a 

O a> 



S o 



1-1?. 



ingier . 

.ntioeli 

laptist Chapel 
Japtist Grove. 

;etliel 

iroadway . . . . | 

luie's Creek. . .| 
halybeateSpg'sl 
oats .........[ 

umberland Un| 

•iil^e i 

•unn ! 

riendsliip . . . . | 
[oily Springs . | 
;;ennebee . . . . | 

allington | 

[aeedonia . . . .' 
eilTs Creek. .1 
lak Grove .... 
iney Grove . . . 

awles 

• wann's Stat'n 
'otali 



1$ 

600.00 
21.00 



15|.$ 



15|.t 



1261.951 

776.841 

568.44) 

102.501 

234.821 

.S'^24.S7| 

259.101 

225.751 

16.341 

3(10.851 

9.661 

40.001 

I 



400.001 
27.521 

1 

15.751 
.30.811 
.53.. 52 1 



4.-311 

2.001 



I 

i7".77| 



4.001 



30.591 

'89!27^ 
"786f.98r 



27.001 
580.051" 



I I I 

89.451.? $ 51.001.<p 60.25' 



2.001 

I 

445.001 



198.141 21.06 
10. 001 



4.001 



8.001 

1 

_11.501 

52.731" 



lO.cOj i: 
.53.521 . 
22.001 . 
1 . 



.501 



27.261 

"4.0nl 
65.(10 
500.00 
162.25 
196.59 
24.00 
123.761 
889.481 
KU.dOl 
122.001 



3.801 ... 

1 ••• 

13.10 ... 



I 

35.741 
10.00! 

I 

2.001 

1.30.051 

I 

69.041 



>8..53 



,55$ 



12.00 



2.001 

1 

1. 


1.35 




1 .... 

1 


25.701 

1 


41.571. 
10.001. 








2.60 



1.771 
852.51|196.06 2516. 17| 172. 32| 



5.00 
7.14 



12.00 

20.001 



4.00 



14.601 



i 225 

600 

48 

10 

13 

65 

2206 

1344' 

1062, 

136 

415, 

4452 

490 

369, 

16, 

365, 

37, 

40, 

4, 

197, 



6.001 1.38.621 ,3.56 
12.501 " 218.36112457 



I 

.551$ 
.00 
.26 
.81 
.35 
.Of» 
.951 
,09| 
.361 
.501 
.901 
.161 
.141 
.751 
.341 
.121 
.161 
.001 
,601 
.341 
I 



1087 
2204 

274 

358 

293 
5133 
3505 
2374 
2286 

383 

2265, 

14358, 

1623 , 

12'68, 

1.55, 
1711, 

446. 

765, 

188, 
48.56. 

595. 

798, 



.301 _ 

681 469.34.65 



TABLE III~SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 



CHURCH. 



Angier 

Antioch 

Baptist Chapel...! 

Baptist Grove 

Bethel 

Barclaysvile ' 

Broadway . 

Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs. 

Coats 

Cumberland ITnion. 

Duke 

Dunn 

Friendship *' ". 

Holly Springs 

Kennebec 

Lillington 

Macedonia 

Neill's Creek 

Oak Grove. 

Piney Grove 

Rawles' 

SAvann's Station. . . 
Turlington 



SUPERINTENDENT AND 
POSTOFB^ICE. 



William Morgan, Angier 

W. .1. Brown, Mamers 

A. L. Smith. Jonesboro 

J. H. Rogers, Fuquay Springs. 

A. A. West. Sr., Manchester.. 

B. F. Maullen, Buie's Creek 

A. A. Collins, Broadway 

I. M. Wallace, Bhie's Creek... 
Paul Bradley, Kipling 

C. T. i*athews. Coats 

W F. Lanier, Kipling 

W. V. Byers, Duke. 

M. M. Jernigan, Dunn 

.T. McD. Parker, Bunnlevel. . . . 
James A. Buchanon, Broadwav 
W. E. Bond. Willow Springs ' 

B. P. Gentry, Lillington 

J. S. Mui-ray. Holly Spi'ings... 

W. A. Parker, Lillington. 

J. F. McLeod, Coats 

G. T. Watkins, Holly Springs.. 
J. F. Sherman, Fuquav Springs 

C. R. G'raham. Swann's Station 
B. H. Tesh. Buie's Creek 



SECRETARY AND POSTOFFICE. 



Miss Eva Johnson, Angier , 

Lola O'Quinn, Maui^rs '.' [ 

J. R. Howard, Jonesboro 

Preelon Howell, Fuquav Springs 
Ora Elmore, Linden . .\ 



Taft Dickens, Jonesboro 

Emily Roberson. Buie's Ci-eek.. 

Jessie Keith, Cardenas 

Maisie 'Patterson, Coats 

C. y. 'TuV'lington", " Du'ke .' ." .' .' .' .' .' .' ." ." 

Alf ord Blay lock. Dunn 

Katie Byrd. Bunnlcved 

H. P. Patterson. Broadwav 

N. T. McLean. Willow Springs. 

J. E. Womble, Lillington 

W. D. Griffin, Hollv Springs 

E. L. Parker. Cardenas 

G. C. Denton. Lillington 

J. ('. Adcock. Walthall 

A. D. Gardner. Fuquay Springs. 
Elsie Womnck. Swann's Station 



TABLE III— SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 



!KURCH. 



ier 

iocli 

tist Chapel 

tist Grove 

hel 

claysvile 

adway ,• 

e's Creek 

Llvbeate Springs. 

ts 

nberlancl Union. 

ie 

m 

endship 

lly Springs 

aneloec 

iington 

cedonia 

ll's Creeli 

i Grove 

ley Grove 

wles' 

ann's Station. . 

rlington 

tal 



F.iirollnient Main Sclioul. 







- i 






■:=:._^ 




Tl 










- (X. 


~ 


~ ^ 


= c 


.X c 


t^\ 


— "^ 


j; 


=.co\ 


r '"^ 


r-sO 


^^1 



10 i 
101 

41 
121 

81 

41 
121 
301 

9| 
17i 

41.... 

12-1 3n 

481 441 



181 
191 



281 

91 

121 
151 
...I 
151 



131 

251 

191 

61 

HI 



401 . 
65i. 

...j. 



9| 
101 

191 HI 

351 85' 

401 421 

24' 371 

...I. ...I 



M 181 2 



49! 
.51 1 
4fii 



131 301 

51 .... 1 



201 661 



111 



201 

. .1 
..1. 
?01 
401 
. .1. 
2-11 
.1 



?31 



42' 451 43 



. ,1 1 

1.^1 22' 
171 40! 



171 121 . 
..' 71. 
51 631. 
47^ 51(11 
33 1 1041. 
281 571 
. . I . . . . 1 . 
62^ 611, 
J J- 1 r>7| 
.521 751 
.571 361 
18' 20 i, 
171 -'61, 
5(t| 
...I, 



40 



...■ 151. 
331 1681. 

...1....I. 
201 481 , 

. . .i 3i 



1261 . 

1441. 

601 . 

1271. 

611. 

321 . 

I 1221. 

I 7621 

. .1 2281. 

181 l^GI. 

..|....|. 

..I 3"8!. 

821 51 3 1 

..j 2251. 

251 2471 

..j 661. 

. .1 1431. 

..1 180|. 

..I 1251. 

..! 721. 

. .1 31 81. 

. .1 771. 

..1 l^^l. 

.1 191. 



I 1 



Misc-ellaneons 






Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

No 

No 

Y< s 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

No 

No 

i^es 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

No 



'2\ 





■r- j 






~> 


3 


















Ti 


•-' .2 i 1 






3 


5S| 


*^ 






4^ d 
op 



"fiors.^l 1" 51 81 '(''321 548Ti602! 16.-i430?!l 11. • 



No 1 


81 


No 1 


10| 


Yes 


11 


No 


....1 


No 


....1 


No 


VI 


Yes 


5041 . 


No 


.... 1 


Yes 


91 


No 


....I 


No 


....1 


Yes 


841 


No 


121 


No 


371 


No 


....! 


No 


....1 


No 


....I 

1 


No 


". '. '. ! 

1 

1....I 




1 2181 



12I.S; 
41 
81 
II 
II 
41 
71 
.. .1 

261 
71 
11 

161 

161 
31 
81 
01 



151 
...I 
441 
101 



115.00!.$ 
49.191 

'.'.'.'.'.'.\ 
1 

1 

82.001 
224.001 

41.761 
156.661 

19.201 
289.921 
.562.72; 
120.001 

66.001 

1 

134.671 

.58.501 
i 

220^501 



27. 47 lip 
1 



20.751 

1 

1 

65.001 
I 

33.101 
166.731 

I 

182.511 
588.291 
107,041 

18.001 

'23 ."551 
30.551 

'.'.'.'.'.'.\ 
40.701 



142.47 
49.19 



20.75 



33'.i5l '35 '.451 



147.00 
224.00 

74.86 
323.39 

19.20 

472.43 

1151.01 

227.04 

84.00 

i.58."22 
89.05 



261 . 20 

'esieo 



l07i 2173.271 1339.141 .3512.41 






•saounq 
-u:^aoo iB^oj, 



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Mrs Rachel Thomas, Jonesboro. 

0'. A. Herring, Buie's Creek 

Jessie Keith, Cardenas 

Mrs. Paul Bradley, Kipling 

C. T. Matthews, Coats 



Miss Mabel Woodworth, Duke 

R. L. Denning, Dunn 

Miss Charlotte Hatcher, Dunn.. 

Miss Margaret Russell. Dunn 

Marvin Bethune • 

Paul Patterson, Broadway, R. 2.. 

Miss' Mamie Camp, Lillington 



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JMINXJTES 



OF THE 



Fiftieth Annual Session 



OF THE 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 



HELD WITH 



The Church at Piney Grove, 
NOVEMBER 4 and 5, 1 925 



J. C. Clifford, Moderator Dunn, N. C. 

J. W. Byrd, Vice-Moderator Bunnlevel, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell, Clerk-Treasurer .Biuie's Creek, N, C. 



Next session meets at Dunn, Wednesday and Thursday, November 10 and 
11, 1926. 

Introductory Sermon — ^J. E, Ayscue, Carthage; Alternate^ — A. C. McCall, 
Duke. 



Gcldsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 

1925 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



Fiftieth Annual Session 



OF THE 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



HELD WITH 



The Church at Piney Grove, 
• NOVEMBER 4 and 5, 1925 



J. C. Clifford, Moderator Dunn, N. C. 

J. W. Dyrd, Vice-Moderator Bunnlevel, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell, Clerk-Treasurer Buie's Creek, N. C. 



Next session meets at Dunn, Wednesday and Thursday, November 10 and 
11, 1926. 

Introductory Sermon — J. E. Ayscue, Carthage; Alternate^ — A. C. McCall, 
Duke. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 

1925 



ORDAINED MINISTERS. 



J. E. Ayscue Carthage, N. C. 

j! D. Betts Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

W. R. Beach Duke, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell • Buie's Creek, N. C. 

W. C. Dowd Manchester, N. C. 

E. N. Johnson, • • Dunn, N. C. 

A. C. McCall Duke, Route 1, N. C. 

S. C. Page Dunn, Route 4, N. C. 

Fred G. Womack Wake Forest, N. C. 

NON-RE^HDENT PASTORS'. 

R. E. Atkins Raleigh, Route 4, N. C. 

A. S. Gillespie. .^ Wake Forest, N. C. 

J. P. Harris / Fuquay Springs, N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD. 

L. H. Campbell. Buie's Creek, N. C. 

B. P. Gentry Lillington, N. C. 

Dr. C. D. Bain Dunn. N. C. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

J. C. Clifford J. A. Campbell, J. M. Byrd, J. W. Byrd, C. W. Flowers, 
C. W. Matthews, H. Y. Smith. 



ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES. 



State Missions — J. C. Clifford. 
Home Missions^ — A. C. McCall. 
Foreign Missions — J. E. Ayscue. 



TRUSTEES BIUIE'S CREEK ACADEMY. 

Time Expiring 1926— E, H. Ballentine, C. H. Norris, D. H. Senter, P. F. 
Pope. 

Time Expiring 1927 — A. Parrish, B. P. Marshbanks, J. E. Lanier, Fred 
N. Day. 

Time Expiring 1928— J. C. Clifford, G. F. Pope, J. W. Byrd, R. G. Taylor. 

Time Expiring 1929 — J, A. Campbell, Z. T. Kivett, B. Townsend. 

Time Expiring 1930 — J. A. Gates, Z. J. Womack, B. P. Gentry, J. M. Byrd. 



PROCEEDINGS 



Piney Grove Church., near Fuquay Springs, 

November 4, 1926. 

The Little River Baptist Association met in its fiftieth annual session as 
above stated. Former Moderator J. C. Clifford called the Association to 
order, announcing that the devotional services will be conducted by Rev. J. P. 
Harris, who after reading the Scriptures, discussed the subject of Prayer. 

The Roll of Churches is called. Twenty of the churches being represented, 
on motion, the Association proceeds to the election of officers, delegates hav- 
ing been enrolled. 

On motion of W. R. Beach, Dr. M. L. Kesler is instructed to cast the vote 
of the delegates for the present officers, which he did as follows: Mfsdera- 
tpr, J. C. Clifford; Clerk-Treasurer, J. A. Campbell; Vice-Moderator, J. W. 
Byrd. , ! d 

Committee on Order of Business, appointed at the last meeting offered the 
following report, which was adopted. 

PROGRAMME. 

Semi-Centennial Session of the Little River Association, meeting at Piney 
Grove Church, near Fuquay Springs, November 4 and 5, 1925. 
Nov. 4. 

9:30 A.M.— Devotional— J. P. Harris. 
10:00 A.M.— Organization. 

10:15 A.M.— Baptist Periodicals — W. M. Thomas, D. H. Senter. 
10:45 A.M.— Aged Ministers — J. McD. Parker, C. W. Flowers. 
11:00 A.M.— Sermon— W. R. Beach. 
Dinner. 

1:00 P.'M.— Devotional — J. P. Harris. 

1:30 P.M.— State Missions— Dr. C. D. Bain, A. C. McCall. 

2:00 P.M.— Home Missions— B. P. Gentry, J. E. Ayscue. 

2:30 P.M.— Foreign iMissions— Mrs. J. G. Layton, W. R. Beach. 

3:00 P.M. — Our Co-operative Programme — Dr. C. B. Maddry. 
Evening Session, 

7:15 P.M.— Devotional — J. P. Harris. 

7:45 P.M.— Temperance — J. D. Betts, R. E. Atkins. 

8:15 P.M.— Orphanage— Henderson Steele, J. M. Byrd. 

November 5. 
9:30 A.M.— Devotional— J. P. Harris. 
10:00 A.M.— Buie's Creek Academy— J. A. Campbell, B. F. McLeod. 
10:30 A.M.— Education— Mrs. W. R. Beach, E. N. Johnson. 
11:00 A.M.— Woman's Work— Miss Mattie Bain, J. C. Clifford. 
11:30 A.M.— Report of Committees. 

Dinner. 
1:00 P.M.— Devotional— J. P. Harris. 

1:30 P.M. — Sunday Schools — William Morgan, A. S. Gillespie 
2:00 P. M.— B. Y. P. U.— Mrs. Dr. C. D. Bain, M. M. Jemigan. 
2-30 P.M.— Obituaries— H. Y. Smith. 
2:45 P.M. — Miscellaneous Business. 
The person whose name appears first on each subject is expected to wrjto 
the report, and the second named is expected to open the discussion. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, 
J. C. CLIFFORD, Committee. 



PEOCBEDINGS 



Piney Grove Church., near Puquay Springs, 

November 4, 1926. 

The Little River Baptist Association met in its fiftieth annual session as 
above stated. Former Moderator J. C. Clifford called the Association to 
order, announcing that th© devotional services will be conducted by Rev. J. P. 
Harris, who after reading the Scriptures, discussed the subject of Prayer. 

The Roll of Churches is called. Twenty of the churches being represented, 
on motion, the Association proceeds to the election of officers, delegates hav- 
ing been enrolled. 

On motion of W. R. Beach, Dr. M, L. Kesler is instructed to cast the vote 
of the delegates for the present officers, which he did as follows: Modera- 
tor, J. C. Clifford; Clerk-Treasurer, J. A. Campbell; Vice-Moderator, J. W. 
Byrd. • ,.^ 

Committee on Order of Business, appointed at the last meeting offered the 
following report, which was adopted. 

PROGRAMME. 

Semi-Centennial Session of the Little River Association, meeting at Piney 
Grove Church, near Fuquay Springs, November 4 and 5, 1925. 
Nov. 4. 

9:30 A.M.— Devotional— J. P. Harris. 
10:00 A.M. — Organization. 

10:15 A.M.— Baptist Periodicals — W. M. Thomas, D. H. Senter. 
10:45 A.M.— Aged Ministers — J. McD. Parker, C. W. Flowers. 
11:00 A.M.— Sermon— W. R. Beach. 
Dinner. 

1:00 P.M.— Devotional— J. P. Harris. 

1:30 P.M.— State Missions— Dr. C. D. Bain, A. C. McCall. 

2:00 P.M. — Home Missions— B. P. Gentry, J. E. Ayscue. 

2:30 P.M.— Foreign f Missions— Mrs. J. G. Layton, W. R. Beach. 

3:00 P.M. — Our Co-operative Programme — Dr. C. E, Maddry. 
Evening Session, 

7:15 P.M. — Devotional — J. P. Harris. 

7:45 P.M.— Temperance — J. D. Betts, R. E. Atkins. 

8:15 P.M. — Orphanage — Henderson Steele, J. M. Byrd. 

November 5. 
9:30 A.M.— Devotional — J. P. Harris, 
10:00 A.M.— Buie's Creek Academy— J. A. Campbell, B. F. McLeod. 
10:30 A.M.— Education— Mrs. W. R. Beach, E. N. Johnson, 
11:00 A.M.— Woman's Work— Miss Mattie Bain, J. C. Clifford. 
11:30 A.M.— Report of Committees. 

Dinner. 
1:00 P.M.— Devotional— J, P. Harris. 

1:30 P.M.— Sunday Schools— William Morgan, A. S. Gillespie 
2:00 P. M.— B. Y. P. U.— Mrs. Dr. C. D. Bain, M. M. Jemigan. 
2-30 P.M.— Obituaries— H. Y. Smith. 
2:45 P.M. — Miscellaneous Business. 
The person whose name appears first on each subject is expected to wr^to 
the report, and the second named is expected to open the discussion. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, 
J. C. CLIFFORD, Committee. 



6 FIFTIETH ANNUAL SBSS^ION. 

The following representatives are enrolled: 

Angier — J. L. Johnson, C. W. Flowers, J. H. Broadwell — 3. 

Antioch — Henry G. Patterson, Ernest Byrd, Aaron Rogers, Osee Rogers, 
J. H. Rogers — 5. , 

Baptist Chapel — J. R. Thomas, A. L. S'mith — 2. 

Baptist Grove — J. T. Thomas, A. H. Baker — 2. 

Bethel — W. F. West, Leslie Matthews, N. A. West, Miss Ora Elmore — 4. 
Broadway — A. P. Thomas. Lola Belle Thomas, Mrs. C. E. Thomas, Mrs. 
H. M. Thomas, A. B. Kelly, J. T. Harwell, Mrs. J. T. Harwell, Miss Pearl 
Thomas, W, M. Thomas. — 9. 

Buie's Creek— J. A. Campbell, B. F. McLeod, W. H. Hatcher, M. A. Williams, 

E. G. Murray, C. O. Southern, H, E. Jones, A. N, Jones— 8. 

Chalybeate .St)rings— D. H. S'enter, C. M. Smith, R E. Smith, Miss Norvie 
Keith, Mrs. Paul Bradley, C. K. Smith, Mrs. E. L. Keith, Jesse Keith. H'etcie 
Wagstaff.— 9. 

Cumberland Union— T. B. Lanier, A. F. Johnson, Morris Weathers, J. F. 
Johnson, J. D. Johnson — 5. 

Coats — Miss Elsie Pope, Miss Mattie Bjain, J. M. Byrd, Mrs. W. E. Nichols, 4 

Duke— C. C. Hall, Mrs. C. H. Avery, C. H. Avery, Mrs. W. R. Beach, W. 
R. Beach — 5. 

Dunn— J. C. Clifford, Mrs. J. B. Holland, Mrs. W. V. Cavenaugh, C. D. Bain, 
Mrs. C. D. B/ain, Mrs. E. H. Eubanks, Mrs. George T. Noel, E N. Johnson, L. 

F. Bailey— 9. 

Friendship— F. J. Bethune, J. W. Byrd, A. C. McCall, Mrs. A. C. McCall.— 4. 

Holly Springs — Mrs. M. C. Thomas, Miss Blanche Patterson, Graham Pat- 
terson, D. J. Patterson, Mrs. D. J. Patterson, W. J. Wilson, H. Y. glmith, 
Earlie Thomas — 8. 

Kennebec— M. T. Olive, B. W. Adams— 2. 

Lillington — Henderson Steele, Edwina Steele, Mrs. J. D. Johnson, Mrs. 
J. G. Layton, Mrs. B. P. Gentry, Mrs. M. B. McKinney— 6. 

Macedonia— J. M. Holt, Mrs. J. C. Staith, J. C. Smith— 3. 

Neill's Creek — R. B. Butts, Walter Johnson, Lloyd Johnson — 3. 

Oak Grove — N. I. Reardon, A. H Denton, L. J. Ttirlington, Miss Lina Tur- 
lington — 4. 

Piny Grove — R. L. Wilkins, J. B. Campbell, H. O. Austin, M. D. Honeycutt, 
S. A. Powell— 5. 

Rawles— Mrs. J. D. Betts, J. D. Betts — 2. 

Swann's Station — L. R. Holt, Myrtle Douglass, Mrs. E. R. Smith, C. R. 
Graham, D. A. Graham — 5. 

Visitors — Mrs. W. A. Judd, C. E. Maddry, R. E. Atkins, J. E. Ayscue, Liv- 
ingston Johnson, Mrs. W. L. H'olleman, W. L. Holleman, M. L. Kesler, C. H. 
NJorris, Mrs. C. H. Norris, A. S'. Gillespie, R. H. Herring, B. L. Middleton, 
E. J. Isenhour. 

Visiting brethren are invited to seats and the following are enrolled: 

Rev, C. H. Norris, Raleigh Association; Rev. J. E. Ayscue, New Pastor; 
Rev. J. P. Harris, New Pastor; Dr. M. L. Kesler, Baptist Orphanage; Dr. 
Livingston Johnson, Biblical Recorder. 

W. M. Thomas reads the report on Baptist Literature. On motion to adopt, 
the report is discussed by L. Johnson, D. H. Senter and W. R. Beach. 

The report on Aged Ministers is read by W. R. Beach. The report is dis- 
cussed by C. W. Flowers, J. P. Harris, C. E. Maddry, N. 1. Reardon, and, on 
motion, is adopted. .... 

The annual sermon is preached by W. R. Beach, using as a text Phil. 1:21 
"For to Me to Live is Christ." 

Prayer by Livingston Johnson. 

On motion, the Moderator appoints a Committee on Nominations for the 



LITTLE, RIVER ASSOCIATION. 7 

entire session. Committee: W. R. Beach, D. H. Senter, D. A. Graham, L. P. 
Bailey and T. B. Lanier. 

On motion, the body adjourns one hour for dinner. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Devotional exercises are conducted by J. P. Harris, "Place of Prayer." 
Prayer by C. H. Norris. 

The report on S'tate Missions is read by C. D. Bain. The report on Foreign 
Missions is read by Mrs. J. G. Layton. Report on Home Missions is not read 
and the writer is to be allowed to send it in to the Clerk. 

On motion to adopt the reports, they are discussed by J. E. Ayscue and 
Secretary Maddry. 

General Manager M. L. Kesler discusses the subject of the Baptist Or- 
phanage. 

J. A. Campbell, Secretary for the Board of Trustees of Buie's Creek Acad- 
emy, reads resolution from the trustees with regard to the change of the 
plan of appointing the trustees. 

On motion, the Association recommends that the charter of the school 
be so changed that in future the trustees shall be appointed by the Baptist 
S'tate Convention rather than by this body. 

On motion, the Association adjourns until to-morrow 9:30 a. m. 

Benediction by Secretary Maddry. 



THURSDAY SESSION. 

Devotional exercises are conducted by J. P. Harris, "The Posture of 
Jesus in Prayer," 

Minutes of yesterday are read and approved. 

Roll of delegates called and new delegates enrolled. 

Visitors invited and the following respond: Rev. B. G. Early, Raleigh 
Association; Rev. R. H. Herring, Sandy Creek Association; Rev. E. J. Isen- 
hour, Sandy Creek Association; Rev. A. S. Gillespie, new pastor at Angier 
and Lillington; E. L. Middleton, Sunday School Secretary. 

J. D. Betts reads the report on Temperance and on motion for adoption, 
R. E. Atkins discusses the report. 

A committee from the Sandy Creek Association is present and asks for 
the appointment of a committee from this body to confer with them in 
regard to the reception of the Juniper Springs Church, which church made 
application for admission into this body a year ago. 

On motion the Association appoints such committee consisting oi J. C. 
Clifford, D. H. Senter, E. N. Johnson. 

Report on Buie's Creek Academy is made by J. A. Campbell. The report 
is discussed by B. F. McLeod. 

Henderson Steele reads the report on Baptist Orphanage. The subject 
having been 'discussed on yesterday, on motion, the report is adopted. 

Mrs. W. R. Beach reads the report on Education. On motion, the Associa- 
tion adjourns one hour for dinner. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Upon re-assembling the devotional exercises are conducted by J. P. Harris, 
continuing the subject of prayer. 

On motion to adopt the report on Education, the subject is discussed by 
E. N. Johnson and the report is adopted. 



8 FIFTIETH ANNUAL SES^ON. 

Miss Mattie Bain reads the report on Woman's Work. The report is dis- 
cussed by J. C. Clifford and B. G. Early and is adopted. 

The report on Sunday Schools not being in hand, on motion, Secretary E. 
L. Middleton is invited to speak on the subject, report to be inserted, if 
received in time. 

Report on B. Y. P. U. is discussed by A. S. Gillespie, R. E, Atkins and A. 0. 
McCall and submitted for publication. 

Report on Obituaries is read by H. Y. Smith. 

Resolution of thanks to the Piney Grove Church and community for boun- 
teous hospitality is passed. 

On motion, E. N. Johnson is endorsed as the Associational Manager of 
our Co-operative programme for this Association for the ensuing year. 

The Committee to confer with similar committee from the S'andy Creek 
Association in regard to the Juniper Springs matter makes a report. On 
motion the report is received and the committee continued. 

On motion; the Association adjourns to time and place appointed for next 
meeting. 

The congregation sings, "Blest be the tie that binds," foUowed by the 
benediction by R. E. Atkins. 

J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk. 



Reports, Resolutions, Etc, 



REPORTS FOR 1926. 

Order of Business — J. A. Campbell, J. C. Clifford. 

Baptist Literature — Miss Mattie Bain, W. R. Beach. 

State Missions — William Morgan, J. E. Ayscue. 

Home Missions — ^W. M. Thomas, A. C. McCall. 

Foreign Missions — D. H'. Senter, E. N. Johnson. 

Education — Dr. C. D. Bain, B. D. Bunn. 

Aged Ministers — W. M. Thomas, J. D. Betts. 

Orphanage — Mrs. W. P. Byrd, D. H. Senter. 

Temperance — ^Henderson Steele, J. M. Byrd. 

Woman's Work — Mrs. Dr. C. D. Bain, Mrs. J. G. Layton. 

Sunday School — Irbin S'mith, B. P. Gentry. 

Obituaries — H. Y. Smith, General Discussion. 

Buie's Creek Academy — J. A. Campbell, B. P. Marshbanks. 

B. Y. P. U.— B. F. McLeod, J. P Harris. 



LIITLE; RIVER ASSOCIATION. 
TREASURER'S REPORT. 

Funds sent Association: 



Angier 

Antioch 

Baptist Chapel 

Baptist Grove 

Bethel • • 

Broadway 

Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate S'prings. 

Coats 

Duke 

Dunn 

Friendship 

Cumberland Union 

Holly Springs 

Kennebec 

Lillington 

Macedonia 

Neill's Creek 

Oak Grove 

Piney Grove 

Rawles 

Swann's 



Minute 


Convention 




Fund. 


Objects. 


Total 


..$ 7.00 


$ 


$ 7.00 


9.00 




9.00 


3.00 




3.00 


3.00 


5.85 


8.85 


4.65 


24.00 


28.65 


5.00 


■ 


5.00 


10.00 




10.00 


7.50 




7.50 


10.00 




10.00 


7.50 




7.50 


25.00 




25.00 


10.00 


. . . « .... 


10.00 


5.00 


29.25 


34.25 


9.00 




9.00 


8.00 


24.09 


32.09 


10.00 




10.00 


5.00 


42.00 


47.00 


7.50 


34.00 


41.50 


5.00 


18.00 


23.00 


10.00 




10.00 


2.00 


13.42 


15.42 


6.00 




6.00 



Total $169.15 $190.61 $359.76 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Treasurer. 



BUIE'S CREEK ACADEMY. 

Last year was the best year in the history of our school, with 740 stu- 
dents enrolled, more than forty-five of them Ministerial students or volun- 
teers for Mission service. The enrollment for the fall term of this year is 
the equal of last year at this date in the session. 

Rev. Fred N. Day, of Winston-Salem, has again shown his love for our in- 
stitution in buying the Johnson property odjoining our present school 
grounds, and donating it to Buie's Creek Academy. 

The property consists of about two acres of land, on which is a two-story 
building. The property is finely located and is worth about $2,500. 

During the year J. A. Campbell and wife, Mrs. Cornelia Pearson Camp- 
bell, have transferred their interest in Buie's Creek Academy, consisting of 
two brick buildings, one frame building and more than twenty-five acres 
of land, to the trustees of Buie's Creek Academy, Incorporated. A disinter- 
ested committee appraising this property estimate that this gift amounts to 
more than $28,000. The Academy grounds, with its six brick buildings, 
three frame buildings and more than thirty acres of land, are worth at least 
$200,000, all of which now belongs to the Baptist State Convention. The 
President of the institution, J, A. Campbell, has leased the school plant 
from the trustees and the school will be run under his management as 
heretofore. 

The Carrie Rich Memorial Library Building, the generous gift of Mr. D. 
Rich, has been completed and has been in use since January, 1925. Under 
the bequests of Mr. Rich Buie's Creek Academy will share in the division 
of his estate, receiving one-sixteenth of its value. The division of his prop- 



10 FIFTIETH ANNUAL SESSION. 

erty will be completed within a short time. The trustees have decided to use 
this money, which may reach $75,000 to $100,000, in erecting a new admin- 
istration building and auditorium, a Memorial to Mr. Rich. 

In order to secure greater assurance of permanency for the institution 
and wider usefulness for the school we recommend that the charter of the 
school be so changed that the trustees of the school shall hereafter be ap- 
pointed by the Baptist S'tate Convention of North Carolina. 

During the year Dr. H. C. Roberts, a valuable member of our Board of 
trustees and a great friend to the school, has died. We recommend that 
Bro. B. F. McLeod be appointed to fill the vacancy caused by his death. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Committee. 



REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

Ninety-five years ago the Biaptist State Convention was organized. A 
S'tate Mission Board was organized at this meeting and from that day until 
this we have been trying to make North Carolina Christian and Baptist. In 
the effort to do this, our work is organized into various departments. 

1. Department of Missionary-pastoral Support in which there are 145 mis- 
sionaries who are giving many communities and destitute sections the Bap- 
tist message. 

2. Department of Evangelism with four workers and one negro evange- 
list who not only evangelize but stimulate the churches along the lines of 
our denominational policies. 

3. Department of New Testament Stewardship with one worker whose 
effort is to induce our people to come to the Scriptural method of finance. 

4. Department of Woman's Work with four workers and two Associational 
workers. 

5. Department of B. Y. P. U. with four workers who are festering plans 
for training and making efficient this generation of young Christians. 

6. Department of Sunday Schools with five workers, together with several 
associational workers who are paid by the local association and the Sunday 
School Board at Nashville, Tennessee. 

7. Department of Student Activities with three- workers who are doing 
much to foster and conserve the spiritual life of our Baptist bo>K and girls 
in state schools. 

Other lines of activity are our hospital and orphanage worlc. building fund, 
summer school for pastors and summer assemblies. 

A comprehensive view of S'tate Missions must face the discouraging as 
well as the encouraging signs. 

DISCOURAGE MENTS. 

1. Our people are not united. Fifteen of the six-three associations are 
co-operating in name only; in fifteen other associations not more than half 
the church members are even nominally sympathetic toward our great mis- 
sionary and benevolent enterprises; and one-third of the active pastors are 
eitTier indifferent or openly antagonistic toward our whole denominational 
program. 

2. Our people are not informed. There are less than 15,000 subscribers to 
the Biblical Recorder; 327 pastors, 1,450 S'unday School superintendents, 
1,500 church clerks as well as many other leaders are not subscribers of our 
denominational paper. 

3. Our equipment is poor. We have 1,400 one-room "cigar-box" church 
houses, ugly and unattractive, served only once a month by poorly paid 
absentee pastors, in the shadow of well-equipped, consolidated school-houses. 

4. Just now the work is seriously hampered by a heavy debt on our run- 
ning account. 



LIITLE RIVER ASSOCIATION. 11 

ENCOURAGEMENTS. 

The results of the years work in every department have been glorious and 
heartening beyond expression. The work of the Board has grown to tre- 
mendous proportions and now comprehends vastly more than the original 
conception of State Missions, The responsibiltiy for leading calls for the 
highest type of Christian statesmanship. Secretary Charles E. Maddry 
combines a passion for souls with enlarged vision. The future is glowing 
with promise and rosy with prophecy if our people will respond generously 
and loyally to a great forward-looking program in our S'tate Mission work. 

CLARENCE D. BAIN. 



REPORT ON B. Y. P. U. WORK. 

'First the blade, then the ear after that the full corn in the ear." 
When Paul admonished the young man Timothy, "Study to show ti -c-/'" 
approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly divid- 
ing the word of truth." he laid the basic principle of B. Y. P. U. work. 

B. Y. P. U. is the training agency of the Baptist denomination. I ^ 
ject is training the young Christians in essential church activities, enlisting 
them in all forms of missionary endeavor, deepening their devotional and 
spiritual life and instructing them in Baptist doctrine and history. 

WORKERS. 

This work is fostered by the State Piaptist Convention and the Sunday 
S'^hooi Board of :he r-ohtiiern Baptist Convention. The '^.tnlG Mission Bnord 
has three whole time workers in this department: Perry Morgan, General 
Secretary; Edwin S. Preston, Field Worker; Miss Winnio Pickett a recent 
graduate from Meredith College who succeeds Mrs. Elma Parabow Davis 
as Junior-Intermediate Secretary. Their time is spent in general field 
work, such as conducting training schools and institutes, holding conventions, 
associational and district rallies. Their services are obtainable for work in 
city, town and country. 

ACTIVITIES. 

There are 1,624 B. Y. P. U. organizations in about 1,150 churches and in 
our schools and colleges. Biut there are at least 1,000 churches in North 
Carolina in which nothing is being done to train the young people. In the 
Little River Association there are 22 churches. In these churches there are 
2 Junior, 1 Intermediate, and 14 Senior Unions. There are at least 11 with- 
out a B. Y. P. U. 

The State B. Y. P. U. Convention is our largest religious gathering, the 
last convention held in Salisbury having been attended by more than 1,600 
representatives. What a tremendous responsibility and opportunity to catch 
up and direct the enthusiasm of such a group of young people. The young 
people set for themselves the organization of one B. Y. P. U. per day for 
a year. 

The B. Y. P. U. holds a large place in the religious life of our denomina- 
tional schools and colleges and a determined effort is being made at our 
state institutions to enlist Baptist students. 

OUTSTANDING POLICIES. 

Division of the state into five districts in each of which there will be 
yn annual convention and the promotion of Associational B. Y. P. U. through 
which many eager, willing groups of young people propagate, within the 
bounds of their own Association B. Y. P. U. work and the things for which 
B. Y. P. U. stands, such as Bible Study, Doctrinal Studies, Missionary Study, 
Stewardship and g^oul-winning, are signs of the bright day which has come 



12 FIFTIETH ANNUAL SESSION. 

for B. Y. P. U. work. In a very great sense these young people are mission- 
aries "beginning at Jerusalem." 

RECOMMENDATION. 

We recommend that all our churches assume B. Y. P. U. as a church task, 
electing the officers, recognizing them as church officers by public installa- 
tion, making them responsible to the church through reports and that we 
support the work with finances, sympathy and prayers. 

This generation of young Christians, trained and made efficient by the 
work of B. Y. P. U., will surely transform the whole life of our denomination 
within twenty years. MRS'. CLARENCE D. BAIN. 



REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

We regard it more than a pleasure to write a report on Orphanage at 
this time of the annual convention of Little River Association; and the source 
of this unusual pleasure comes from the fact that not only are the Baptists 
of North Carolina supporting the Orphanage work now in more splendid 
manner than they ever have before, but also we are happy to state that the 
members of Little River Association are taking on renewed spirit in the 
work. We note through the columns of "Charity and Children", the Or- 
phanage paper, that Churches and Sunday schools in this Association re- 
sponded in what might be called more than liberal manner following the 
last meeting of this body. This evidence of enlarged interest in the Orphan- 
age was very marked indeed at the Thanksgiving season, when it is the cus. 
torn for all Christian people and some others to remember the orphans; 
and we have noted in the paper that the interest seems to be of a lasting 
kind. 

It pleases us greatly that the Christian people of our land are coming to 
realize that it is a God-given privilege to contribute to Orphanage work in 
all denominations. We feel sure that once they catch the vision of real 
service in the Kingdom, our people will come to know that a sense of privi- 
lege exercised will bring greater happiness than if our acts of service in 
the Kingdom are performed merely through a sense of duty. 

We sincerely trust — and we feel that we may be assured, judging by past 
performance — that our people will keep the cause of the Orphanage before 
them constantly, and while other claims may be pressed upon them, and they 
may respond generously, still the institution from which we expect so much 
may have and hold its rightful place in our minds and hearts. 

HENDERSON STEELE, Committee. 



REPORT' OF COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS. 

iSlunday Schools — Bros. L. H. Campbell, B. P. Gentry, C. D. Bain. 
Executive Committee— J. C. Clifford, J. A. Campbell, J. M. Byrd, J. W. 
Byrd, C. W. Matthews, H. Y. Staith. C. W. Flowers. 

Delegates to State Convention — ^A. C. McCall, E. N. Johnson, C. W. Flowers. 

Delegate to Southern Baptist Convention — E. N. Johnson. 

State Mission Board Representative — ^J. C. Clifford. 

Home Mission Board Representative — A. C. McCall. 

Foreign Mission Board Representative — J. B. Ayscue. 

Time, Place and Preacher: 

Time: Wednesday after first Sunday in November, 1926, at 9:30 A. M. 

Place — Dunn. 

Preacher — J. E. Ayscue; Alternate, A. C. McCall. 



LITTLER RIVER ASSOCIATION. 13 

Union Meeting, Fifth S'unday in November and Saturday before, 10:00 
a. m. Place, Oak Grove. 

Program for Committee for Union Meetings for next year, B. N. Johnson, 
A. C. McCall, J. D. Belts. 

Order of Business for next Association, J. A. Campbell and J. C. Clifford. 

W. R. BEACH, 
D. H. SENTER, 
T'. B. LANIER, 
L. P. BAILEY, 
D. A. GRAHAfM. 



RESOLUTION OF TRANKS. 

Resolved, That we do acknowledge our gratitude to the members of Piney 
Grove Church and the good people of this community for their cordial hos- 
pitality, and for the gracious manner in which they have entertained the 
Association and its messengers. 



REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

The Foreign Mission Board has passed its 79th year of service. Under 
God's blessing the work has expanded and today Southern Baptists are sup- 
porting in fourteen foreign countries, 544 missionaries and 2,494 native 
workers. 

Last year 4,420 churches and out-stations reported 111,872 members. Of 
these churches 308 are self-supporting; 819 worship in buildings owned either 
by the Sbuthern Baptist Convention or by the native membership; 2,985 
congregations are homeless. 

The 860 schools and colleges are filled to overflowing, with an enrollment 
of 35,106 students. Hundreds are denied admission for lack of room. 

Nineteen medical missionaries and seven nurses, assisted by forty-eight 
native physicians and nurses are engaged in healing the body while min- 
istering to the soul. 

Through the twenty-three Baptist hospitals and eighteen dispensaries 
treatments were given 86,212 patients. 

Recognizing the power of the press, twenty-two missionaries, assisted by 
native helpers, print and circulate tracts, leaflets, portions of the Bible, Sun- 
day school quarterlies, and denominational papers. Southern Baptists own 
and operate, through the Foreign Mission Board, eleven printing establish- 
ments which last year released for circulation 81,994,180 pages of Christian 
literature. 

Is all the effort worth while? The 12,856 baptisms by our missionaries 
last year, answers the question. 

Yet the work is barely begun. "In Africa," says Dr. Love, "we have only 
touched the fringes." In that vast continent, 150,000,000 souls are without 
Christ. 

In China, with its teeming population of 450,000,000, we have missionaries 
in six provinces; twelve provinces are untouched. 

In Japan we have twenty-eight missionaries laboring in a territory of 
190,000 square miles. 

More than 1,000,000,000 souls have never heard the name of Christ. 

A debt of $1,800,000 hangs over our Foreign Mission Board and stares us 
in the face! 

For three years the usefulness of our missionaries has been seriously 
hindered by our refusal to provide funds for buildings and equipment. Two 
hundred and twenty-nine new laborers are needed to re-inforce the workers 



14 FIFTIETH ANNUAL SESSION. 

already on the field, yet for a year and a half, not one new missionary has 
been sent out, supported by the Foreign Mission Board. 

Unless Southern Baptists render "unto God the things that are God's" 
some fields must be abandoned and missionaries recalled. 

MRS. J. G. LAYT'ON, Committee. 



REPORT ON AGED MINISTERS. 

We do not think that we, as Southern Baptists should be satisfied with the 
present efforts made to care for our Aged Ministers, those who iiave given 
their lives to such a worthy cause. I hope that we may soon find some plan 
whereby we can take care of them in their old age in such a way rhat it will 
be a credit to the denomination. Our preachers are the most poorly paid 
class of people I know. Few of them are able to lay by anything to take 
care of them in their old age. S'o let us see that no Southern Baptist Min- 
ister shall lack for any of the necessities of life. We shall be made the" 
happier by giving to such a worthy cause. As the Lord has said that, "It 
is more blessed to give than to receive." 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. McD. PARKER. 



REPORT' ON OBITUARIES. 

As usual, brethren, death has been among us. Many of our brethren and 
sisters have been called to their reward. Thirty are reported in our letters 
during the past year as having died. We should prize highly the work and 
their good examples. We should cherish the memory of our dead. I think we 
often forget too soon the memories of our beloved who have passed; and 
also fail to emulate the faithful lives they, many of them, have lived. Let us 
esteem each other more highly, cheer one another along the way while we 
are here in the work of the Kingdom. If we could see the importance of the 
faithful doing of what is committed to us as God's servants, but so often 
we fail to realize how vital are our acts and how important the faithful doing 
while we may the will of H'im Who commands us to be faithful in His service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. Y. SMITH. 



REPORT ON TF^MPERANCE. 

The big city newspapers will this week be filled with news stories and 
editorials concerning the liquor conditions, or prohibition enforcement in 
the United States. The basis for their articles is the current Collier's 
National Weekly announcement of the final vote in the nation-wide poll 
which shows that America is still wet despite almost six years of attempted 
Federal control. 

Three questions were asked in a face to face inquiry throughout the coun- 
try with 263,683 men and women in American homes. They were: 

No. 1. Are you satisfied with (Prohibition) conditions as they are? 

No. 2. Is the law enforced in your locality? 

No. 3. If not, do you consider the law enforceable? 

Of the 263,583 asked these questions by 1,000 bonded representatives oper- 
ating in all states. 

68.0 per cent say NO — they are not satisfied with conditions as they are. 

61.2 per cent say NO — the law is not enforced in their localities. 

60.9 per cent say YES — they consider the law enforceable in their lo- 
calities. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSIOCIATION. 15 

&o while "Bt)oze^ — is the Victor", as Collier proclaims, there is a majority 
which believes that the prohibition law can be enforced. 

Studying the table of votes in the big cities it would seem that we are 
expecting too much; because Washington wherefrom is to come our relief, 
is shown to be America's wettest city. 

82.2 per cent say. No — they are not satisfied; 81.1 per cent say, No — ^the 
law Is not enforced; 68 per cent say NO — the law cannot be enforced — in 
Washington. 

These votes are made more impressive when compared to Denver, Gol., 
which shows up in this poll as being the dryest city in America. Only 36 
per cent out in Denver are dissatisfied with present conditions, 31 per cent 
say the law is not enforced there; and only the very small number of 17.9 
per cent think that the law is not enforceable. 

The vote does not show, that the driest states are those which had state- 
wide prohibition many years before Federal prohibition went into effect, 
January 19, 1920. There are 34 such states. Kansas, Colorado and Mfiin 
now lead as the driest. In the case of Maine, the vote is surprising because 
every other Atlantic seaboard state is among the wettest group as shown 
by the vote. 

"It is obvious from the results of this inquiry," conclude Collier's, "that 
America is still wet; .... 

The Journal wishes to point out — that so long as 60.9 per cent of the peo- 
ple believe that the prohibition law can be enforced that it can and will 
be done. 

We admit, that if the Collier poll is at all accurate, there "still is much 
work for the plumber." 

The tables of votes in cities and states as printed in Collier's are very 
interesting and should be studied by all because — as pointed out, they show 
"What a fix we are in" — whether it be progress or failure, depending en- 
tirely upon whether the reader is Wet or Dry. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. D. BETT^l 



REPORT ON CHRISTIAN LITERATURE. 

From the days of the earliest Apologistsi to the present, Christian litera^ 
ture has had a place. This place has been filled in varying degrees. Times 
were when issues called forth the best, and indeed, the world is richer today 
because of these trying times. Of all the Literature in the world, Christian 
Literature holds a dear place to the child of God. 

The printing press with all its modern improvements, has made a multi- 
plicity of books and papers at very low prices. Surely with S'olomon we may 
say, "For the making of books, there is no end." T:rash and worse than 
trash is being run off by the thousands. Book stalls and stores have on their 
shelves for sale that which will ruin the character of the reader. These will 
drown the youth of the land in a delusion of filth. Only eternity will re- 
veal What will become of us if this deluge is not counteracted in some way. 

The daily press, weekly and monthly magazines are doing much to im- 
prove our people. Yet, in all these, people are exposed to things they ought 
not to be. Murder, scandal, divorce cases, fratricide and a long list of ugly 
sins are played up in big type on the front page. Organized effort on the 
part of the big dailies is gathering and publishing such that decency and 
right would leave out. 

In the face of all these facts, there is, at least, one way out. Counteract 
this by publishing the right kind of literature. The people are reading, 
Boys and girls are reading. It seems that the height of wisdom would be 
to give them good literature to read. Our denominational paper is doing a 
great service here. There is no better paper for North Carolina Baptists 



16 FIFTIETH ANNUAL SESSION. 

than the Biblical Recorder. This is the one paper that ought to be found 
in every Baptist home. Your committee can't urge upon all too much to 
take this paper and read it. 

Charity and Children comes in for a good deal of our support. A club 
ought to be in every Sunday School. Kind words will be very helpful if 
done in the same way. Permit us to mention the S'unday School Quarterly. 
Some are trying to discount it. We can't say too much for it. The lessons 
are developments of great themes. The Graded Lessons will greatly improve 
all who will adopt them in their classes. 

Your committee would like to call attention again to the fact that our chil- 
dren are reading. They are going to read more and more. If they have the 
best, they will read the best. But rest assured they are reading. Then it 
would seem the part of wisdom to give them our Baptist literature. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. M. THOMAS. 



REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 

There are two vital factors in all permanent progress in Christian prin- 
ciples. These are evangelism and education. In the same breath that our 
Master commanded: Go — make disciples, He also said, teaching them. Any 
body of Christians that have neglected any part of that command have de- 
clined. We believe the home should be the foundation of Christian educa- 
tion, and, perhaps if the home training were more thorough, there would 
be less trouble with our young people when they begin the study of science. 
The Christian religion is the mother of the modern College, the oldest of 
which came into existence when Luther Rice traveled from one end of the 
country to the other awakening Baptists to their opportunities, Wake Forest 
being the first in North Carolina for young men. Now we have our girls 
as well provided for in Meredith College. The educational system has so 
grown till we now have Mars Hill and Wingate as Junior Colleges for both 
boys and girls and Boiling Springs and Buie's Creek as fine high schools. 

All of these are preparing our young people to do the work of the King- 
dom with efficiency. May we support all together with our great Semi- 
naries and training schools these by our sympathy and prayer as well as 
our patronage. Respecfully, 

MRS1. W. R. BEACH. 



REPORT ON WOMAN'S YORK. 

In 1823 during the Mission dawn, Mrs. Ann Haseltime Judson wrote to her 
American S'isters: "When American women are induced to contribute of 
their worldly substance to enlighten their own sex on the other side of 
the world, their prayers and their influence also are joined." With this 
thought and hope the days of shadows changed to days of beginning and 
expansion. Slowly the brightening day came when a quiet meeting was 
held in Richmond in 1888 for the purpose of organizing the women in mis- 
sion work. Miss M. E. Mcintosh was elected president, Miss Annie W. Arm- 
strong, Corresponding Secretary. The new organization was known as the 
Executive Committee of the Woman's Missionary Societies, Auxiliary to the 
,S'outhern Baptist Convention. The brief constitution adopted in that little 
meeting, with few changes, binds the Woman's Missionary Union of today. 
Purpose to stimulate the missionary spirit and the grace of giving among 
the women and children of the churches. In 1888 the women and children 
gave $45,768.32, thirty-six years later, or in 1925 they gave $2,972,865.25. 

In North Carolina in 1886 a Central Committee was formed with Miss 



LITTLE! RIVER ASSOCIATION. 17 

Fannie E, S. H'eck its president. The same purpose as outlined by the 
Southern Union, filled the hearts of the North Carolina women. The first 
State Convention was held in Goldsboro, 1891, with fourteen societies repre- 
sented, last year 2,298 societies reported $324,571.16. 

Going back to the beginning and on through the seventeen years of organ- 
ized mission work among the women of our Association we find the same 
spirit of co-operation in stimulating interest in missions and the grace of 
giving. In 1907 the women of the Little River Association gave to mission 
objects $271.83, this year we report $4,358.77. The superintendent traveled 
513 miles organizing and trying to help the 35 societies in our Association. 
Eight societies reported A-1 this year while all did splendid work. The call 
of the hour at home and unto the uttermost part of the earth reveals to us 
that if we would keep step with the needs and opportunities there is no 
time for halting. As laborers together we would carry out the great com- 
mission of Jesus Christ, our Lord. Sincerely, 

MATTIE BAIN, Committee. 



18 FIFTIETH ANNUAL SiESSlON. 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

The Little River Woman's Missionary Union held its nineteenth annual 
meeting with Piney Grove Baptist Church, August 27th, 1925. 

THURSIDAY MORNING. 

The devotional was led by Mrs. O. D. Lyon. Mrs. Virginia K. Edgerton, 
chairman of Personal Service, gave a splendid report of work done during 
the year. In the absence of Mrs. W. R. Beach, chairman of Mission Study, 
Miss Mattie Bain read the report also reported the work of the superinten- 
dent. Both showed interest and encouragement in our work. 

Mrs. C. D. Bain presented the Biblical Recorder in a pleasing and instruc- 
ive manner. Many who have said I do not believe in Foreign Missions would 
have thought differently had they heard Mrs. G. P. Marshbanks tell of the 
work, its needs, opportunities, etc. Miss Mildred Stewart sang, "Can the 
World S'ee Jesus in Me, in You." We were fortunate in having Mrs. C. E. 
Maddry visit our Association and bring us a message on the Cooperative 
Program. 

After the appointment of committees the meeting adjourned to meet at 
2 o clock. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Mrs. D. D. Overby led the devotional exercises after which Mrs. G. D. 
Eunn made a splendid talk on the Responsibility of the Woman's Missionary 
.S'ociety to Our Young People. Society Methods were discussed by the follow- 
ing: Programs, Mrs. J. A". McLeod; Enlistment, Miss Zula Rogers; S'ocial 
Features, Miss Maisie Patterson; Slaving Our Own, Mrs. I. M. Wallace. Miss 
Mildred Stewart sang, "Give of Your Best to the Master." Mrs. C. D. Bain 
made an announcement concerning Children's Week in the Sunday School 
which we hope will be observed this year in our Association. Miss Alice 
Witherspoon, a graduate of the Southwestern Training School, Fort Worth, 
Texas, gave us a real glimpse of the Training School life as she carried us, 
in thought, through the different departments of the school work. Miss 
Brooks told of the work of the Baptist Bible Institute, New Orleans, La. 
We hope this information about these schools will lead some of our splen- 
did girls to these institutions. 

The nominating committee made the following report: Miss Mattie Bain, 
Superintendent; Mrs. Joel Layton, Young People's Leader; Mrs. Willie Mor- 
gan, Mission Study Chairman; Mrs. Virginia K. Edgerton, Personal Service 
Chairman; and Miss Mabel Burt, Secretary-Treasurer. On motion the report 
was adopted. 

Time and place committee report Angler as next meeting place, the last 
Thursday in August, 1926, which was adopted. 

MATTIE BAIN, Superintendent. 

MRS. VIRGINIA K. EDGERTON, S'ecretary, Protem. 



MISSIONARY ORGANIZATIONS. 



Church 


Name of Organization. 


President and Postoffice. 


aa 


O 

CI i2 


1 

e 


Angler 


W. M. S., Sunbeams 


Mrs. Wm. Morgan Angler ' tKA]<B no an 




Antioch 

Bethel 

Broadway 

Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs.. 

Coats 

Duke 


W. m S„ Yv W. A.^ G: A,? 

R. A., Sunbeams 

W. M. S., Sunbeams 

Woman's Missionary Society. 
W. M. S., Y. W. A., 

G. A., Sunbeams.... 

Y W. A., Sunbams 

W. M. S.,Y.W.A., Sunbeams. . 

W. M. S.. Sunbeams 

W. M, S.. Sunbeams 

W. M. S.. Sunbeams 

Woman's Missionary Society 

W. M. S.. Sunbeams 

W. M. S.. Y. W. A,, G, A.. 

R. A., Sunbeams 

W M S , Sunbeams 


Mrs. B. W. O'Quinn, Mamers... 
Mrs. Flossie West, Bunnlevel.. 
Mrs. W. M. Thomas, Broadway. 

Mrs. Powell Bell, Buie's Creek. 
Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Cardenas.. 

Mrs. Jesse Parrish, Coats 

Mrs. W. R. Beach, Duke 


113 434.54 
1.00 

18 28.66 

50 702.40 

106 .324.-36 

.58 246.50 

1 1 S7 nn 




Dunn 


Mrs. J. B. Holland, Dunn ■. 

Mrs. F. D. Byrd, Bunnlevel 

Mrs. D. J'. Patterson, Broadway 
Mrs. W. P. Byrd, Lillington 

Mrs. R. E. Auston, Cosma 

Mrs. M. L. Womack, Swans.. 


73 


tnns. «p; 


• 


Friendship ' 

Holly Springs 

Lillington 

Piney Grove 

Swann Station 


20 .58! 131 ; 
90.791 . 
.... .308. .511 

511 116.411. 

191 117 QQI 


Castleberry Memorial. 




I....I 180.00 


.. 


Total 




1 555|$4358.77| ] 



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TABLE No. 2— STATISTICS OF LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



FOR SUPPORT OF LOCAL CHURCH WORK. 



Church 



Angier 

Antioch 

Baptist Chapel 

Baptist Grove 

Bethel 

Broadway 

Buie's Creek. . . .! 

Chalybeate Sp'gs 

Coats 

CumberlandUnion | 

Duke i 

Duun 

Frindship 
Holly Springs 
Kennebec 
Lillington 
Macedonia 
Neill's Creek 
Oak Grove 
Piney Grove 

Raw'les 

Swann's Station . 
Total ."112616 





























'O 




§► • 




^. 










. 


'O 






w 








03 






C(l, 


c 


0) 

i 




Building 
Repairs. 


53 


KM c 

£5^ 


o 
c 




24| 211.931 169.151 1783. 49| 27384.30 



TABLE No. 2— STATISTICS OF LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



Church 



FOR SUPPORT OF MISSIONS, EDUCATION AND BENEVOLENCE. 









^^ 



X 














C3 




o 
1 




rl =! 




02 


« 


1 


O 


1 


<5 


^ii 


+2 sj 


ci 
o 


B 


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o 




13 


p 




.52 ^ 


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a3 S^ 


^■? 


d 




t! M M 




O^ 


?? 


GS 








h-i 






O 


W 


iS 




o§ 







$ 113.00 






ChapeL. 
Grove. . . 


645.07 

72.60 



Angler 
Antioch 
Baptist 
Baptist 

Bethel I 

Broadway I 

Buie's Creek 1 

Chalybeate Sp'gsj 

Coats 1 

Cumberland Un..| 

Duke ....' I 

Dunn I 

Friendship | 

Holly Springs...! 

Kennebec I 

Llllington | 

Macedonia | 

Nelll's Creek | 

Oak Grove | 

Plney Grove . . . . | 

Rawles I 

Swann's Station! 



100.00 
11.19 



17.16 



110.25 

1377.68 

345.75 

622.32 

29.25 

433.60 

4099.03 

452.35 

465.25 

24.09 

379.821 30.00 

5.001 10.00 

34.50] 

I 2.001 

57.301 7.20 
13.421 
91.891 6.00 



3.00 



2.85 



B9.00 
9.36 



15.19 



5.00 



3.O0 

4.70 



3.00 



146.24 

6.25 



27.05 



74.00 



!$■. 



.1$. 



19.00 
14.48 



20.001 3.411 

i.... 



10.45 

75.00, 



6.00 

5.00] 



3.00] 

20.801 6.50 



1.20i 25.00 



57 
263 
179 
177 

52 
170 
640 

57 
166 



223. 
15. 



2.00 
24.13 



22.03 
54.50 



3.00 



2.00 



5 
183 



,001, 
,311 

I. 



7.00 



69.15], 



14.00 



5.00 
4.00 



6.00 



] 

$ 113.08|i 

645.071 

] 96.001 

5.85 



61.00 



5.25 
14.75 
50.00 



77.50 
18.95 



28.50 



40.00 
29 ."is 



228.45 

1641 . 12 

886.59 

880.32 

132.00 

695.741 

4910.86 

528.57 

709.09 

24.09] 

668.37 

42.00 

34.50 

18.00 

331.46 

13.42 

231.39] 



Total 



9372.85|186.55]132.11]290.04|150.43: 2281.181118.07] 29. 05] 325. 70] 12835. 



960.54 
2404.10 

341.01 
83.98 

121.45 
1182.70 
3290.60 
1980.45 
1610.50 

376.20 

2856.80 

11745.85 

1589.51 

1711.29 

152.09 
1746.98 

554.86 

392.00 

166.00 
5696.36 

356.42 

900.59 



40220.28 



..;# 



TABLE No. 3— SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTORY. 



Cliurcb. 


SUPERINTENDENTS AND 
POST OFFICE. 


SECRETARIES AND 
POSTOFFICES 


Angier 








Miss Lola O'Quinn, Mamers. 
J. R. Howard, Jonesoovo, ]>. 2. 
Frulon Howell. Fuquay Springs. 
Miss Ora Elmore Lind'-'^n 


Baptist Chapel 

Baptist Grove 

Bethel 


A. L. Smith, Jonesboro, R. 2. ...... . 

A. L. Baucom, Fiuiuav .Spiings. . 

A A West, Manehest(>i- 




W. M. Morgan, Broadwav 




Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs 


I. M. Wallace, Buie's Creek 

Paul Bradley, Kipling 

Irbin Smith, Coats 


French Baker, Buie's Creek. 
Tyson Matthe ws,ChalyoeateSp'gs 
C J'. Turlington, Coats 


Ctimberland Union 


W. F. Lanier, Kipling 

W V Bvers, Duke 


M. W. Weathers, Kipling. 
C. H. Avery, Duke. 








J. McD. Parker, Duke Mrs. J. T. Byrd, Buunlevel. 


Holly Springs 


James A. Buchanan, Broadway. R. 2..)D. P. Patterson, Broadv^ay, R.2. 

Walter E. Bond. Willow Springs 1 Walter C. Bond, Willovi^ Springs. 

Henderson Steele, Lillingron ,T. R. Womble. Lillin2-ton. 


Kennebec 


Lillington 


Macedonia 

Neill's Creek 

Oak Grove 


A. S. Austin, Holly Springs, R. 2 

W. T. Campbell, Varina 

J F. M'cLeod, Coats 


Roy Weathers, Holly Springs. 
Miss Lucile Morgan, Lillington, 1. 




G. T. Watkins, Holly Springs 


Leo Betts, Fuquay Springs, R. 1. 
A. D. Gardner, Fuquay Springs. 
Elsie Womack, Jonesboro, R. 1. 






Swann's Station 


C. R. Graham, Jonesboro, R. 3 



TABLE No. 3— SUNDAY SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



Churches 



SUNDAY SCHOOL 


ENROLLMENT 












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5 


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•o 








oi m 


-a 


a 

—1 0- 


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5S. 


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SPECIAL INFORMATION 



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Angier 

Antioch 

Baptist Chapel. . 
Baptist Grove. . . 

Bethel... 

Broadway 

Buie's Creek. ... 
Chalybeate Spgs. 

Coats 

CuraberlandUn. .' 

Duke 

Dunn 

Friendship 

Holly Springs.., 

Kennebec 

Lillington 

Macedonia 

Neill's Creek... 

Oak Grove 

Piney Grove . . . . 

Rawles 

Swann'sStation 



Total. 



131 16 

141 8 



9 1 18. 

71 101 

111 10 

301 18 

131 27 

171 14 

61 



19 34 
6 

24 
40 
25 

25 



131 22 

481 641 

Hi 181 

121 501 

61. ...I 

10| 251 

91 .351 

101 41 



36 



as 50 

461 53 
201 39| 

581. ...1 



45 



19 44 

18| 111 

50 1 560 

351 133 



II 
16311 
156 



25 



14| 10| 
351 531 
401 141 



50 



62 

184 



56 



75 



143 

•••I 4811 
...I 10211 
40ii 8;38|| 
62| 36811 
121 19411 
...1 6411 
. ..1 24011 
48! 56511 
, . .1 202' [ 



441 251 30311 



I....I. 



26 60 ..I 14511 

43 52 ..1 20711 

12| 451 1 ! 1251! 

,|....|, ■ 



111 38[ 161 471 301 1621.... |.... I .304|| 
."81 .321 191 141 231 23| . . . . 1 . . . . | 119|| 
91 10| 11! 27| 30| 50|....|....| 12811 



Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

No 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 

No 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

No 

No 

No ' " 

No 

No 



No 
No 

Yes 
No 

No 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

No 

No 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 

No 



No 



No 



I 

■ 2| 9 

101 7 

,..| 1 



I I 

$ 70.97 



12.98 



40.00 

206.38 

9.80 

109.18 



493.76 
101.00 



198.25 



62.80 



11.75 



$ 76.601 Yes 
........ I No 



21.00 



50.00 



40. < (3 
131.05 



177.55 



62.78 
35.66 



78.30 



11.48T No 



No 



Yes 
No 
No 
Yes 



Yes 
No 



No 
No 



Yes 



2721 4191 4821 5921 591|1732| 180| 187 1 4414 11 



1021 1551 1006.571 1393.1 



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W. M. U.— THE WOMAN'S WORK. 



Churches. 



Presidents and Leaders 
of Woman's Organizations 
and Postoffices. 



-1 
Ms 
a© 

B 


< 


6 


< 

O 


M 


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Angier 

Antioch 

BaptistChapel . . 
Baptist Grove. . . 

Bethel 

Broadway 

Buie's Creels. . . . 
ChalybeateSp'gs. 

Coats 

CumberlandUn.. 

Duke 

Dunn 

Friendship 

Holly Springs. .. 

Kennebec 

Lillington 

Macedonia • 

Neill's Creek. . . 

Oak Grove 

Piney Grove. . . . 

Rawles 

Swann's Station 



Mrs. W. M. Morgan, Angier. 
Mrs. G. W. O'Quinn.Mamers, 



Miss Flossie West.Bunnlevel, 
Beulah Thomas. Broadway.. 

Mrs. R. P. Bell 

Mrs. Paul Bradley, Kipling. 
Mrs. Jessie Parrish, Coats. . 



Mrs. E. L. Hassel, Duke. 
Mrs. 0'. B. Holland, Dunn. 



Mrs. D.J. Patterson, Broadway 
Mrs W. P. Byrd, Lillington.. 



Mrs. R.E. Austin, FuquaySp'gs 



12 



15 



18 



331. 



121 



20 



16 



I 

261 
45 1 



...I II 18 

55! 4] 17 

651 2| 22 

151 21 25 



191 . 



32 



33.44 

20.20 



I 1| 102.791 102.79 



I ...I 



S ft 
OS 

©:=; 



8 $150.28$ 54.611$ 204.89 
27 1 483.57 



115.40 31.91] 146.01 

1 702.401 702.40 

293.26 151.881 445.14 

104.05 274.42] 378.47 



160.401 193.84 
135.361 155.56 

• I 



I 27] 2] 21] I 330.511 330.51 

..I ...] . 



156.11] 156.11 



Mrs. JessieChildress.Jonesboro 13 



1 ] 134.42 



Total. 



224] 45| 36] 16] 287] 28] 138] 716. 23] 2000. 39] 3434.59 



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MINUTES 



■OF THE- 



FIFTY^FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 



-OF THE- 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 

HELiD WITH 

DUNN BAPTIST CHUf^CH, 
Hovetnbep 10 - 11, 1926 



Moderator— J. C. Clifford , . Dunn, N. C. 

Vice-Moderator — Jas, A. Buchanan. .Broadway, N. C 

Clerk-Treasurer — J. A. Campbell. Buie's Creek, N. C. 

The next session meets at Chalybeate S'prings, November 9 and 10, 
1927, first session 9:30 A. M. 

Introductory Sermon — E. N. Johnson, D'unn, N. C. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 

1927 



MINUTES 



-OF THE- 



FIFTY=FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 



-OF THE- 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 

HHLiD WITH 

DUHH BAPTIST CHUt^CH, 
Ho\/emhep 10 h 11, 1926 



Moderator— J. C. Clifford , . Dunn, N. C. 

Vice-Moderator — Jc;,,?. A. Buchanan. .Broadway, N. C 

Clerk-Treasurer — J. A. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

The next session meets at Chalybeate S^prings, November 9 and 10, 
1927, first session 9:30 A. M. 
Introductory Sermon — E, N. Johnson, Dunn, N. C. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 

1927 



ORDAINED MINISTERS. 



J B. Aysciie Bule's Creek, N. C. 

J. D. Belts Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell .Bule's Creek, N. C. 

N. G. Duncan . Bule's Creek, N. C. 

W. C. Dowd Manchester, N. C. 

A. S'. Gillespie Chalybeate Springs, N. C. 

E. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

A. C. McCall. Erwin, N. C. 

S. T. Morris . Bule's Creek, N. C. 

S. C. Page. R.P.D. 4, Dunn, N. C. 

;S. A. Rhyne Erwin, N. C. 

F. G. Womack Wake Forest, N. C. 

NON-RESIDENT PAS^TORS. 

R. E. Atkins Route 4, Raleigh, N. C. 

J. P. Harris Fuquay Springs, N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD. 

L. H. Campbell, B. P. Gentry, C. D Bain, Mrs. C. D. Bain. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

J. C. Clifford, J. A. Campbell, J. W. Byrd, J. M. Byrd. C. W. Flowers, C. W, 
Matthews. H. Y. S'mith. 



ASSOCIATION AL REPRESENTATIVES. 

State Missions — J. M. Byrd. 
Home Missions — A. C. McCall. 
Foreign Missions — J. E. Ayscue. 



TRUSTEES BUIE'S CREEK JUNIOR COLLEGE. 

Time Expiring 1927 — A. Parrish, B. P. Marshbanks, J. E. Lanier, Fred 
N. Day. 

Time Expiring 1928— J. C. Clifford, G. P. Pope, J. W. Byrd, R. G. Taylor. 

Time Expiring 1929— J. A. Campbell, Z. T. Kivett, B. Townsend. 

Time Expiring 1930— J. A. Gates, Z. J. Womack, B. P. Gentry, J. M. Byrd. 

Time Expiring 1931— E. H. Ballentine, C. H. Norris, D. H. Senter, D. B. 
Teague. 



PKOCEEDINGS 



First Baptist Church, Dunn, N. C, 

Wednesday, November 10, 1926. 

The Little River Baptist Association met in its fifty-first annual session as 
above stated at 9:30 a. m. Former Moderator J. C. Clifford called the Asso- 
ciation to order. The devotional services are conducted by Rev. A. C. 
McCall. 

Roll of churches called, showing eighteen churches represented. Dele- 
gates are enrolled. 

On motion, the Clerk is instructed to cast the vote of the body for J. C. 
Clifford, present incumbent, for Moderator. 

On motion, James A. Buchanan is elected Vice-Moderator. 

On motion, J. A. Campbell is elected Clerk-Treasurer. 

Visiting brethren are invited and the following respond: 

Livingston Johnson, Editor of the Biblical Recorder; W. M. Gilmore, 
representing the Co-operative program; B. G. Early, Recorder representa- 
tive. 

Committee on Programme reports and on motion the report is adopted, 
as follows: 

PROGRAMME. 
LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION, DUNN, 1926. 
NOVEMBER 10. 

9:30 a.m.— Devotional — A. C. McCall. 
10:00 a.m. — Organization. 

10:15 a.m. — Baptist Literature — Mattie Bain, W. R. Beach. 
10:45 a.m. — Aged Ministers — W. M. Thomas, J. D. Betts. 
11:00 a.m. — Sermon, J. E. Ayscue. 
DINNER. 
1:00 p.m.— Devotional— A. C. McCall. 
1:30 p.m. — Temperance — H'. Steele, J. M. Byrd. 
2:00 p.m. — ^^Sunday Schools — Irbin Smith, B. P. Gentry. 
2:30 p.m. — Education — C. D. Bain, B. D. Bunn. 
7:30 p.m. — Devotional exercises — A. C. McCall. 
8:00 p.m. — State Missions — William Morgan, J. E. Ayscue. 
Home Missions — W. M. Thomas, A. C. McCall. 
Foreign Missions — D. H. Senter, E. N. Johnson. 
Unified Programme — W. M. Gilmore. 

NOVEMBER 11. 

9:30 a.m. — Devotional exercises — A. C. McCall. 

10:00 a.m.— B. Y. P. U.— B. F, McLeod, J. P. Harris. 

10:30 a.m. — Woman's Work — Mrs. C D. Bain, Mrs. J. G. Layton. 

11:00 a.m. — Obituaries — H. Y. Smith, General Discussion. 

11:30 a.m.— Orphanage— Mrs W. P. Byrd, D. H. Senter. 

12:00 m. — Reports of Committees, &c. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, 

J. C. CLIFFORD, Committee. 

DELEGATES AND VISITORS' ENROLLED AS FOLLOWS: 

Angler — William Morgan, C. W. Flowers, A. S, Gillespie — 3. 
Antioch — Zula Rogers, Titus Rogers, Aaron Rogers. — 3. 
Baptist Chapel — Letter only. 
Baptist Grove — A. L. Baughcom, L. S. Prince, W. H. Lee. — 3. 



6 FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION. 

Bethel— G. A. Matthews, C. D. McCorquodale.— 2. 

Broadway — A. B, Kelly, Pearl Thomas, H'. M. Thomas, Mrs. C. E. Thomas, 
Mrs. H. M. Thomas, W. M. Thomas, Lola Belle Thomas. — 7. 

Buie's Creek — Mrs. J. F. McKay, Miss Virginia Edgerton, John Ousley, 
Carl Ousley, J. F. Blackman, H. C. Ousley, Mrs. H. C. Ousley, Mrs. J. A. 
Campbell, J. E. Ayscue Mrs. J. E, Ayscue and J. A. Campbell. — 11. 

Chalybeate S'prings — C. K. Smith, Mrs. D. H. Senter, D. H. Senter, George 
D. Campbell, J. B. Keith, Cora Mae Smith.— 6. 

Coats — Mrs. T. D. Stewart, J. M. Byrd. — 2. 

Cumberland Union — Marvin Weathers, A F. Johnson, J. O. Weathers. — 3. 

Dunn— Mrs. C. D. Bain, E. M. Slaughter, Mrs. J. L. Connell, J. C. Clifford, 

C. D. Bain.— 5. 

Erwin — ^W. G. Byrd, J. R. Turlington, F. A. Barbour, Mrs. J. R. Turling- 
ton. — 4. 

Friendship— C. L. Avery, A. C. McCall, A. F. Jones, W. C. Bethune.— 4. 

Holly Springs — H. Y. S'mith, Leon Byrd, W. J. Salmon, James A. Buchanan, 
B. B. Wilson.— 5. 

Kennebec — W. O. McLean, Otho Hilliard. P. L. Smith, M. T. Olive, Marie 
Wagner. — 5. 

i^illington— B. D. Bunn, Mrs. H. A. Edge.— 2. 

Macedonia — J. C. Smith. — 1. 

Neill's Creek— Mrs. J. B. Keith, N. A. Matthews, W. T. Campbell.— 3. 

Oak Grove — Mrs. Lillie Mason, Mrs. Lina Turlington, L. G. Turlington, 
N. I. Reardon. — 4. 

Piney Grove — I. L. Howell, Mrs. I L. Howell, Electa Betts, J. W. Camp- 
bell, R. E. Atkins, W. B. Jones, W. A.- Mason, Ramon Betts.— 8. 

Rawles — J. D. Betts, J. D. Betts, Jr., Lettie Betts. — 3. 

S'wann-r-Robert Wilson, C. R. Graham, L. G. Holt, Alberta Graham, Bettie 
Graham, Mrs. D. A. Graham, D. A.. Graham, Clifton Graham. — 8. 

Visitors — Mrs. W. F. Pearson, J. P. Harris, L. Johnson, W. M. Gilmore, 
Mrs. R. E. Atkins, B. G. Early, Raleigh Association; Mrs. Geneva Bass, Mrs. 
A. E. Alderman, Mrs. W. S'. Strickland, Miss Grace Alderman, W. S. Strick- 
land and A. E. Alderman, New South River Association; G P. Lanier and 
J, E. Kirk, Johnston County Association. 

The subject of Baptist Literature is discussed by Editor Livingston John- 
son, Bro. B. G. Early announcing that he will take subscriptions for the 
Recorder. 

The Associational sermon is preached by the appointee, Rev. J. E. Ayscue, 
who takes as his text, "Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, to-day and forever," 
Heb. 13:8- "The Unchanging Christ' 

Benediction by Dr. L. Johnson. 

On motion, the Association ad.iourns one hour for dinner, which is served 
in the Sunday School rooms of the Church. 

AFTERNOON. 

The devotional exercises are conducted by Pastor McCall. Subject: "The 
Lord came and stood and called as at other times." 
The Moderator appoints the following committees: 
On time, place and preacher for next session — J. M. Byrd, J. F. Byrne, 

D. A. Graham. 

Committee on Nominations— H. Y Smith, J. A. Buchanan, W. M. Thomas. 
The report of the Committee on Aged Ministers is read, and after discus- 
sion by J. D. Betts and J. P. Harris, on motion, the report Is adopted. 

Bro. W. M. Gilmore read the report on Temperance. The subject is dis- 



LITTLE RIVER ASS'OCIATION. 7 

cussed by J. M. Byrd, J. F. Blackman, J. E. Ayscue and, on motion, the re- 
port is adopted. 

Report on Sunday Schools not being ready the discussion is deferred. 

The report on Education is read by Dr. C. D. Bain. The discussion fol- 
lows with B. D. Bunn and E. N. Johnson leading, and the report is adopted. 

The Association adjourns until the evening session. Prayer by B. G. 
Early. 



EVENING SESSION. 

Congregation sings, "In the sweet By and By." Prayer by A. S. Gillespie. 
Devotional exercises conducted by A. C. McCall, 

Visitors recognized as follows: A. B. Alderman, Mrs. Alderman. W. S. 
Strickland, Mrs. S'trickland and Miss Grace Alderman, of the New SoutM 
River Association. 

The pastor of the Dunn Colored Baptist Church is recognized also. 

BUIE'S CREEK ACADEMY. 

The Association at its 1925 session recommended that the charter of Buie^s 
Creek Academy be so' changed that the trustees shall hereafter be appointee! 
by the Baptist State Convention. J. A. Campbell, Secretary or the Board, 
reports that such change has been made and that the Baptist Board of Edu- 
cation for North Carolina has authorized the institution to raise its standard! 
to do Junior College work. 

From funds left from the D Rich estate, a new auditorium and adminis- 
tration building, costing $150,000, has been completed during the year and 
is now in use. Fifty-four first year College students have been enrolled dur- 
ing the fall term. 

The report on S'tate Missions is read by William Morgan, the report on 
Home Missions by W. M. Thomas, and the report on Foreign Missions by 
D. H. Senter. 

On motion to adopt, our unified program is discussed by Rev. W. M. 
Gilmore 

Rev. E. M. Johnson read a report from the F&stor's Conference setting out 
a certain objective for each of our churches for the ensuing year. On mo- 
tion, this objective is printed in the Minutes, urging all churches to under- 
take to raise at least that much for the next year. 

On motion, the Association adjourns. 

Benediction by J. E. Ayscue. 



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11. 

Devotional exercises conducted by A. C. McCall. 

Report of Committee on Nominations is made and adopted, as follows: 

Sunday School Board — L. H. Campbell, B. P. Gentry, C. D. Bain, Mrs.. 
C. D. Bain. 

Executive Board— J. M. Byrd, J. W. Byrd, C. W. Matthews, H Y. Smith, 
J. A. Campbell, J. C. Clifford, C. W. Flowers. 

Delegate to Southern Convention — E. N. Johnson. 

Delegate to State Convention — A C. McCall. 

Representative of State Missions — J. M. Byrd. 

Representative of Home Missions — A. C. McCall. 

Representative of Foreign Missions — J. E. Ayscue. 

J. C. Harris discusses the work of the B. Y. P. U. 



8 FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for next Association reports and 
the report is adopted as follows: 

Place — Chalybeate Springs. 

Preacher — E. N. Johnson. 

Time — November 9 and 10, first session 9:30 a. m. 

Mrs. C. D. Bain reads the report on Woman's Work. The subject is dis- 
cussed by Mrs. Bain, Mrs. J. E. Ayscue, E. N. Johnson and report is adopted. 

The Association pauses in its work for a few minutes in memory of the 
signing of the armistice, with appropriate remarks by J. C. Clifford, J. A. 
Campbell and M. L. Kesler. 

On motion, the Association appoints a committee of three — A. C. McCall, 
J. E. Ayscue and B. B. Wilson — to report on the plans and work for our 
Union Meeting for next year. 

H. Y. S'mith reads the report on Obituaries. Bro. C. W. Flowers pays 
tribute to Bro. J. E Deal of the Angler Church, B. G. Early and J. A. Camp- 
bell in memory of Bro. T. B. Lanier of the Cumberland Union Church, both 
of whom are among our dead for the year. 

The subject of the Orphanage is discussed by Bro. D. H'. Senter and Super- 
intendent M. L. Kesler, of our Thomasville Orphanage. The report is to 
be handed in to the Clerk. 

The Committee on Union meetings report and the report is adopted, as 
follows: 

1. That the Union Meetings be held on Saturday before each fifth Sun- 
day, using one day only; 

2. That the meeting in January be held at Angler; the meeting in May 
be held at Friendship and to be known as the S'unday School Convention; 
the meeting in July to be held at Holly Springs; 

3. That the local church prepare the programme for the meetings in Jan- 
uary and July, the pastor of the local church being chairman of the Pro- 
gramme Committee; that the Sunday School Board prepare the programme 
for the S'unday School Convention. 

On motion of J. A. Campbell, the Association returns its warmest thanks 
to the brethren, sisters and friends of the Dunn Church for the fine enter- 
tainment provided for the delegates and visitors to this session of the Asso- 
ciation. 

On motion, the Association adjourns to meet at Chalybeate Springs in 
1927. 

Benediction by Dr. M. L. Kesler. 

J. C CLIFFORD, Moderator. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk. 



LITTLE RIVER ASS^OCIATION. 

WRITERS AND SPEAKERS FOR 1927. 

Order of Business — J. A. Campbell, J. C. Clifford. 

Baptist Literature — F. G. Britt, J. S. Farmer. 

State Missions — M. M. Jernigan, J, A. McLeod. 

Home Missions — E. M. Slaughter, J. C. Clifford. 

Foreign Missions — B. P. Gentry, J. P. Harris. 

Education — Henderson Steele, B. P. Marshbanks. 

Aged Ministers — C. W. Flowers, J. D. Betts. 

Hospitals — Mrs. J. G. Layton, Dr. S. A. Duncan. 

Orphanage — Miss Mattie Bain, R. E. Atkins. ? 

Temperance — A. C. McCall, D. H. S'enter. 

Woman's Work — S. A. Rhyne, E. N. Johnson. 

Sunday Schools — B. P. Marshbanks, J. E. Ayscue. 

B. Y. P. U.--B. F. McLeod, A. SI Gillespie. 

Obituaries — J. M. Byrd, General discussion 

First named to write the report, second one to open the discussion. 



OUR GOAL FOR 1927— $9,600.00. 

For our Co-operative Programme, exclusive of the Orphanage. 

Angler $.250.00 

Antioch 650.00 

Baptist Chapel 75.00 

Baptist Grove 50.00 

Bethel 50.09 

Broadway 150 .00 

Buie's Creek 1,200.00 

Chalybeate Springs 750.00 

Coats . 600.00 

Cumberland Union 50.00 

Dukd . 400.00 

Dunn, First 3,200.00 

Friendship 450 . Of 

Holly Springs 600 . 00 

Kennebec 50 . 00 

Lillington 500,00 

Macedonia^ . 100.00 

Neill's Creek 100.00 

Oak Grove 50 . 00 

Piney Grove 150 .00 

Rawles' . . . 50.00 

Swann's S'tation 125 . 00 

$9,600. 0» 



10 FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION. 

THE BAPTIST CO-OPERATiVE PROGRAM. 

Southern Baptists and North Carolina Baptists, through the action of their 
'Conventions, are committed to the plan of the Co-operative Program in 
-financing aU of their denominational enterprises. 

According to this plan, all the money contributed by individuals and 
churches for the support of all the causes fostered by our denomination 
-is to be sent to the treasurer of the Baptist S'tate Convention, Walters 
Durham, Raleigh, who will divide it among the different objects according 
to the proportion agreed upon at our last Conventions, namely: 50 per cent 
'to State-wide objects and 50 per cent to South-wide and World-wide objects. 

While the Thomasville -Orphanage is a vital part of the Co-operative Pro- 
gram, it is supported in the same way it has been from the beginning, name- 
ly: through the once-a-month offerings from the Sunday Schools and the 
Thanksgiving offerings once a year, which should be sent direct to the 
Treasurer, F. B. H'amrick, Thomasville. 

While we recognize the right of each individual Baptist to designate his 
gifts to whatever objects he may desire, and this right will be respected 
absolutely by Treasurer Durham, yet we would earnestly recommend that 
all of our people give their money undesignated. This is the fairest and 
most equitable way to do it The ratio of divisicn among the different 
objects has been carefully worked out by a group of our representative 
brethren in the light of all the needs of each object and has been accepted 
by our Conventions in session. Each of these different objects is looking to 
the Baptist denomination, and to that only, for its support as well as for its 
direction. 

In the light of the foregoing facts, and in the light of the distressing 
needs of all our enterprises, we v/ould recommend that this Association com- 
mit itself heartily to the plan of the Co-operative Program. 

We would recommend further that our pastors and other leaders put on 
an intensive campaign of informing the people in each of our churches 
about all the objects included in the Program, and that they see to it that 
from now on, each member, out to the last individual, has an opportunity to 
make regular offerings to the whole Program, according to the S'criptural 
way, 1 Cor. 16:2. 

We would recommend also that our Association accept $9,600.00 as its 
part of the $600,000 goal, exclusive of the Orphanage, accepted by our State 
Convention as its part of the $9,000,000 goal accepted by the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention for 1927. 

We recommend further that the goal accepted by our Association be ap- 
port'ioned among all our churches upon as fair and equitable a basis as pos- 
sible, and that the churches adopt this goal suggested or some other that 
may be agreed upon, and then that each church make an every-member- 
Canvass December 5-12, or some other time, preferably daring December, 
and try to underwrite this objective, which is in no sense an assessment, 
but merely a suggested goal. To the end that the Canvass may be made 
successfully, we would suggest that the most careful preparation be made 
of both canvassers and people, beginning! at least two months before the 
canvass is made. 



REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

I^ would be difficult for a mother, at the close of the day, to enumerate all 
the things which her busy hands have done throughout the day. It would 
be manifestly impossible for her to make an adequate report of her minis- 
trations throughout the years but they might be characterized by the spirit 
'Of unselfish,, loving service. 

Likewise, it is difficult to give a full report of organized Woman's Work 



LITTLE RIVER ASSiQCIATION. 11 

in our denominational life during the years or even the year but we can 
note the foundations on which it has builded. They are four: 

1. Prayer — For God's guidance and blessings on all that we should under- 
take for His name's honor and glory. 

2. S'ervice — On the part of every woman, with the highest motive as 
shown by the W. M. U. motto, "For ye serve the Lord Christ." 

3. Information — That we might know as to the need and progress of 
Ihe King's business, 

4. Stewardship — Of time, gilts and life itself. 

The W. M. U. believes in taking to God our problems and taking from 
H'im our plans. It believes that "the effectual, fervent prayer of a righteous 
man availeth much. ' It believes that "more things are wrought by prayer 
than this world dreams of." Therefore, through its calendar of prayer t'sch 
day is started with definite, siccific prayer for some phase of our ^^'0I Id- 
wide work or for some of our workers by name. In addition, there are 
three reasons of prayer during the year for concerted thought and pri'jer 
for Fr i-eign Missions, for Home Missions and for State Missions. 

The W. M. U. believes that the spirit of love expresses itself in helpful- 
ness; that the spirit of Christ sends one forth to minister to the needs of 
others, both needs of body and needs of soul. Through the personal ser- 
vice phase of the work not only the kindly, neighborly deeds are stressed 
but organized efforts of helpfulness are urged, always with the motive, 
"For ye serve the Lord Christ." 

The W. M U. realizes that before the heart can be stirred and the will 
be crystalized into action, the mind must be informed. Therefore, first of 
all, it stresses the study of the Bible as the source of information regarding 
God's purpose and God's plan for the redemption of the world. All the world 
is seen in all the Word. Not only through the magazines, Royal Service, 
World Comrades, and Home and Foreign Fields does it spread information 
concerning the progress of the Master's work but through the medium of 
Mission Study books the needs and opportunities of the fields are made 
real. Perhaps the splendid part which women took in the 75-Million Cam- 
paign was due largely to the fact that they were already comparatively 
informed. S'o thoroughly does the W. M. U. believe in information that it 
has established a Training School at Louisville, Ky. The State W. M. U. 
is memorializing our Baptist State Convention to pay the indebtedness on 
Meredith College in three years instead of fifteen years, pledging its loyal 
support to the enterprise. 

The W. M. U. believes that 

"We give thee but thy own. 
Whatever the gifts may be, 
All that we have is thine alone. 

A trust, O Lord, from thee." ^ 

This trust, includes not only money but also time, talents,, influence and 
opportunities as gifts of God to be used for the glory of Him whose we are 
and whom we serve. 

Four leaders of W. M. U. work have proven these four foundations to be 
sound. It is impossible to measure spiritual values in material terms but 
since giving is not a natural but a Christian grace, let us note in the fol- 
lowing scale, the growth in the grace of giving during each decade. 

1886-1896 $ 27,330 . 51 

1896-1906 99,068.05 

1906-1916 360,793 . 75 

1916-1926 2,150,506 . 59 



12 FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION. 

In the past ten years in our state the work has grown from 1,316 socie- 
ties to 2,298 societies but our enlistment work is far from finished. With 
the W. M. U. standing for the principles which have been mentioned, is there 
any valid reason why every saved woman who is a member of a missionary 
Baptist church should not be affiliated with the organized agency for spread- 
ing the gospel? 

In our own Association, under the letidership of Miss Mattie Bain as 
superintendent, the W. M. U. work is a miniature of the larger organizations, 
in which the same principles are being stressed. We have 13 W. M. S , 5 Y. 
W. A., 6 G. A., 3 R. A., 11 S'unbeams, making a total of 38 societies, with 
a membership of 543. These organizations have contributed during the 
year $3,434 17. Seven of these societies have attained the A-1 standard. 
The banner offered by Miss Dorothy Kellam, State Young People's leader, for 
highest per cent of work done during the year by young people's organiza- 
tions was awarded to our Association. Plans for Association-wide mission 
study are being made by Mrs. H. A. Edge, Mission Study Leader, and repre- 
sentatives from- each society in the Association are invited to an all-day 
meeting in the home of Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn, on Tuesday, November 16, 
for study and definite plans. 

Just as in the home the mother is the helper, standing side by side with 
the head of the house, upholding the principles and seeking to advance the 
interests of the home, so the W. M. U likewise is always auxiliary to a 
greater organization. It does not aspire to be more than a helper. Let 
every church that desires earnest, informed, consecrated help in carrying 
out the Lord's program to the uttermost parts of the efath, set about fos- 
tering the W. M. IT. organizations. MRS. CLARENCE D. BAIN 



REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

The great command of Jesus, "Go ye into all the world and preach my 
Gospel," is still in force. It has never been abrogated nor repealed. 

The Foreign Mission Board is in debt. The debt was contracted on the 
promise of the Southern Baptists. The debt has not been paid because we 
fell down on the seventy-five million campaign. The Board is economizing 
the best it can without withdrawing any of the missionaries now on the 
foreign field. Debts are hard masters on Mission Boards as well as Individ 
uals. So much of our money contributed is going for interest charges. It 
is the duty of Southern Baptists to wipe out this debt as soon as possible 
and get our mission work on a cash and business basis. 
Respectfully submitted, 

D. H. SBNTER, Committee. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR REPORT ON EDUCATION— 1926. 

Long ago Paul, writing to Timothy, set the ideal for Christian Education 
in these words, "For God has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power, 
and of love and of sound mind." As pointed out by Dean Brown of Yale, 
Paul's ideal means that the young Christian needs that equipment which 
may be called "Stamina, Sympathy and Scholarship" For well rounded 
personality, these factors must be developed. Furthermore, they can and 
ought to be developed; and any system of Education, which does not develop 
these, is defective. For Stamina, that ability which enables one to "S^tand- 
up-to' , whether physical, intellectual or spiritual, can and ought to be de- 
veloped; likewise, Sympathy, which means love for God and one's fellows. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSlQCIATION. 13 

and likewise, a sound mind, which the great Apostle regarded as one of the 
gifts of the good God, can and ought to be developed. 

The following facts for the session of 1925-1926 indicate a steady growth. 
There were enrolled 1081 high school students in Mars Hill, Wingate, Boil- 
ing Springs and Buie's Creek, while 1787 students were enrohea in college, 
distributed as follows: Wake Forest, 731. Meredith, 467; Chowan, 149; Mars 
Hill, 271; Wingate, 169, In addition Wake Forest enrolled 790 in summer 
school, reaching in this way some 400 teachers in our public schools, 240 
of whom were registered for Bible. In May and June 1926, our high schools 
graduated 174, our colleges graduated 196, while 96 finished the two-year 
Junior College course. In our high schools and colleges we had 238 prepar- 
ing for the ministry and 32 for Foreign Mission service. During the year 
Buildings and Equipment were added and completed, valued at $1,150,155.00, 
thus bringing the value of all schools under the control of the Convention 
to $3,151,518.00. Their endowment is valued at $3,237,052.00. Prom this 
figure, in order to get the Net worth, should be subtracted a total indebted- 
ness of $1,165,000.00. 

These facts are encouraging and yet we must not forget that "To them 
that hath shall be given." God has wonderfully prospered North Carolina 
Baptists and has given larger responsibilities and opportunities. Educa- 
tionally, the task ahead of us is to see to it that our Institutions provide 
the best to the end that leaders shall be equipped with "Stamina, Sympathy, 
and Scholarship". To accomplish this end, money in greater abundance 
must be given by our people, for our Institutions must have buildings, 
annual support and endowment. At present 1047 of those enrolled in our 
Institutions do not live in buildings owned by the Institutions and in the 
matter of annual income the State is providing by taxation for the Univer- 
sity alone about six times as much as all our institutions receive from endow- 
ment. We have lost nine high schools within the past few years because 
of the State's rapidly expanding high school program and for the reason 
that no institution, unless it caters to the wealthy, can survive without 
funds over and beyond what the students pay. It is quite clear that others 
of our schools will go the way of our high schools, unless more funds can 
be secured through the Co-operative Program or by special campaigns out- 
side of it. A full support of the Co-operative Program would insure a steady 
income for our schools such as the State has from taxation. It is no longer 
a question of students, for the best who graduate from our high school are 
seeking to enter our Baptist Schools. It is solely a question of proper finan- 
cial support for those already in or seeking to enter so that they may develop 
that power and love and a sound mind of which Paul speaks. C. D BAIN. 



REPORT ON BAPTIST LITERATURE. 

Thomas Carlyle said: "The true University of these days is a collection 
of books"; and he also said, in substance, "That knowledge depends on what 
we read after all manner of Professors have done their best for us." 

If then the printed page has great power either for good or evil, what 
attitude shall we take towards the circulation of printed matter? It is the 
duty of the church to furnish the best reading matter to young and old. 
If it fails to do so, other agencies will supply the worst reading and fill the 
minds of the people with impurity and ruinous error. 

Then if we are interested in our church and denominationaT work we 
want to know more about it and our best source of information is the Bib- 
lical Recorder. Charity and Children takes a very important place, for 
every one loves to know about the orphans. Then it is so important that 



14 FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION. 

our Home and Foreign Field together with many others should be in every 
Baptist home in the Little River Association. Respectfully, 

MRS. T. D. STEWART. 



REPORT OF THE MINISTERIAL RELIEF AND ANNUITY BOARD. 

After studying carefully the report of the Relief and Annuity Board, it 
moves us as a committee to express our thanks to God, for the great bless- 
ings which have attended the work of the Board during the past year. 

We would also express our earnest appreciation of the uniiring efforts 
of our beloved Secretary, Dr. William Lunsford, and the members of the 
Board in behalf of ministerial relief and annuities. 

It is noted that the Board has succeeded in maintaining the regular allow- 
ances to beneficiaries with but few changes. 

During last year the relief beneficiaries received $1126,091.24 while the 
annuity beneficiaries received $15,894.08. 

The Board is caring for 1183 beneficiaries of whom 611 are ministers, 
424 widows and 150 dependent children. 

We are glad to report that the Board has been able to comply with the 
condition attached to the additional gift of $100,000.00 by Mr. J. D. Rocke- 
feller, the condition being that the Convention raise an additional 
$400,000.00. 

We are thankful for the New Service Annuity plan, which was adopted 
by the Convention at Houston, Texas, last May. 

This new beneficiary service plan is available for all ministers and other 
denominational workers in active service, their widows, and orphan chil- 
dren. Respectfully submitted, 

i W. M. THOMAS. 



REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

In submitting a report on Temperance we are not in position to say 
whether the forces that are fighting for a return of the legalized whiskey 
traffic are well organized or whether indeed they are really in earnest in 
their apparent effort to legalize the traffic. But this we do know: we know 
that the temperance forces are better organized than ever; and we 
are willing to say that we do not believe there will ever be 
a return to legalized whiskey selling again in i^merica. Since 
Prohibition has been in force, the result has been so manifestly 
in favor of its continuance that we are sure there will never again 
be sufficient pressure brought by the whiskey element to influence any 
appreciable number of people into favoring saloons. We might say that 
there is a vast host of people who at first looked with disfavor on Prohi- 
bition who will now fight against a return to the old order of things. 

The state of public mind augurs well for the Prohibition forces. The next 
phase of Prohibition to be considered is the attitude of those won away from 
influence of whiskey. Has the legislation that took away the grog-shop 
llielDed to put in its place an inclination in the minds of the m«sses toward 
religion? We well know of course that it Tips not. And here is where the 
Church and its forces must step in. One thing we must keep in mind, and 
that is: Unless the rank and file of church membership manifests such 
great reverence and loyalty for Church and Christ and the things that per- 
tain to the Kingdom, then we cannot expect non-members to become inter- 
ested. The outsider is guided largely in his attitude by the conduct of the 



LITTLE RIVER ASS'OCIATION. 15; 

insider. It would seem that there is large work for the church to do inside 
its borders. We must as loyal Christians, with sober-minded purpose, de- 
termine to interest the unsaved in the cause of the great Kingdom we have 
vowed to help in upbuilding. 

It seems to us that the work of the church of today calls for far greater 
effort than ever before. There are forces of unrighteousness at our very 
door, and we need the help of every sober-minded, true-hearted and loyal 
Christian to help in the work. Therefore we need to be temperate in thought,, 
word and deed in order that we may have the larger influence and our effort 
count for most. Respectfully submitted, 

HENDERSON STEELE. 



A GREAT ENTERPRISE. 

In our country the state is the unit of civic life, among Southern Bap- 
tists, Each state has, its own organization for mission work within its own 
bounds. Missionaries are sent to destitute fields; S^unday School and B. Y. 
P. U. workers are sent to labor among the churches; schools, colleges, or- 
phanages, and hospitals are fostered; old ministers are supported; a Baptist 
paper is published, W. M. U. work is fostered. 

Prom the office of the State Secretary appeals are made to the churches 
and missionary information is spread. Thus, State Missions becomes a 
mighty bond of union between the churches of a state. 

The churches respond to the appeals and send their money to the State 
Secretary, where it is disbursed among the different organizations, going 
out to do mission work, reaching the unreached and training the untrained 
for the cause of Christ. 

During the years 1925-1926, the churches of the Little River Association 
contributed to this cause, the Co-operative Program, Orphanage not included, 
$7,049.77, as follows: 

Angier $ 260.47 Dunn, First 3,145.15 

Antioch 33.2 . 50 Friendship . 204 . 2'i 

Baptist Chapel Holly Springs 243.75 

Baptist Grove 5.85 Kennebec . 24.0^ 

Bethel 48.27 Lillington 548 . 40 

Broadway 38 . 73 Macedonia . 42 . 00 

Buie's Creek 701.58 Neill's Creek 37.35 

Chalybeate Springs 477.73 Oak Grove 20.00 

Coats......... 524.25 Piney Grove 123.38 

Cumberland Union . 39.25 Rawles 34 . 22 

Duke 143.05 Swann's Station 55.50- 



Ninety-six years ago there were 10,000 Baptists, white and colored, in 
North Carolina To-day there are 364,000 white and 250,000 colored. Great 
progress has been made, yet we have some heart-ache that must be over- 
come. There are 2,300 white Baptist churches in the Convention and the 
records show that over 600 gave nothing to the Co-operative program last 
year. 

We must live together, work together, and blend our hearts together a;nd' 
overcome some of our denominational weak points and save our people for 
the work of Christ WILLIAM MORGAN. 



16 FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL. SESSION. 

REPORT ON THE ORPHANAGE. 

The year has been so crowded with interesting work that we can scarcely 
realize that it has passed. We have practically the same number both in 
the Orphanage and in Mothers' Aid we had a year ago. The same stream 
of applications keep on flowing in. For the last few months there seems 
to be more cases of deep distress than ever before. Many pastors have had 
their patience tried by our unfavorable answers to these calls of distress. 
We are moved with compassion but we are helpless with a haunting regret 
that we can do no more. ^ 

We have had good crops, the best we have had for several years, both at 
Thomasville and at the Kennedy Home. We are also suffering from the low 
price of cotton. 

We are especially thankful for our health record. We have recently 
weighed and measured every child at Thomasville and the showing is that 
our children, those that have been with us for some time, are above the 
average in physical development. To be well is the right of every child. 
To be happy is another right of his, and all together leading to a wide open 
door of hope. 

EDUCATION AND TRAINING. 

No orphanage that expects the decent regard of mankind can neglect the 
school and training work for the children. We have been gradually pulling 
up the quality of our work. We consider ourselves fortunate in securing 
Mr. J. L. Fortney, of Georgia, as Principal of the school. He has had sev- 
eral years of successful experience which will be of great value to our work. 
His work at Thomasville and that of Mr. L. L. Shaver at the Kennedy Home 
give an encouraging outlook on that side of our life. 

The moral and spiritual life of our children are always of deepest concern. 
Our own Dr. John E. Wliite has just been with us in a meeting. You are 
not surprised that a man who preaches on great occasions and to a great city 
church can adapt himself to a group of young people. That is why he can 
preach to the others. W^e have had a great feast of spiritual things. The 
effort was not for ingathering, but the deepening of our life. Pastor Gardner 
is wisely looking after the additions all along through the year. 

THE DEBT AND THE WAY OUT. 

We are in debt, fifty thousand dollars, the largest debt we ever had. We 
were behind thirty thousand last year. That debt, of course, had to be paid 
out of this year's collections. 

WHY THISi DEBT? 

Contributions have fallen off. The last Thanksgiving offering was a little 
disappointing. But the great loss has been in the once a month collections. 
A large per centage of the Sunday Schools take no collections, and those who 
take them, many of them, have fallen behind. It is significant that those 
who do nothing for the co-operative program do nothing for the Orphanage 
either. The damaging notion behind it all is that the Orphanage has too 
much money, or that the money will come without special effort. There are 
two ways in which we can curtail expenses. One is to cut down the quality 
of the work we are doing; the other is to quit receiving children. Either 
will be disastrous. The only thing to do is to roll up a great Thanksgiving 
offering. Urge the slogan of "One Day's Work" for the orphanage. Then 
follow it up with a collection once a month from every Baptist Sunday 
School in the S'tate. This is the plain way out. 

M. Ia KESLER, Committee. 



LITTLE RIVER ASS'OCIATION. 17 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

The Home Mission Board is the agency for "electing, directing and com- 
bining the energies of the denomination for the propagation of the gospel." 
It has a glorious record of achievement which has been won through heroic 
sacrifice and dauntless courage. 

This is the greatest hour for Home Missions in the history of our coun- 
try. The problems were never so acute, the demands so urgent, the oppor- 
tunities so great and the obligations so overwhelming. This conviction is 
growing with thoughtful persons who realize the significance of America 
for the salvation of the world. America constitutes at once the greatest 
field and force in all the world for Christian civilization. Christian states- 
men everywhere are beginning to realize this. Problems at home are as 
serious and complicated as those beyond the sea. 

Our country takes great pride in the fact that she stands at the head in 
so many things. We must face the solemn fact that our country has become 
notorious for its disrespect for law, for its numerous murders, for its com- 
mercialism and materialism. Nothing but the mighty power of the gospel 
of Christ will save us from this deluge of worldly diversion and material 
prosperity. These things constitute a most serious problem which deserves 
the thoughtful consideration of our people. Our work abroad will advance 
apace as we lay the foundations at home. 

DEPARTMENTS OF THE WORK. 

Our Home Mission work is "divided into several different departments — 
work among Jews, Deaf Mutes, Soldiers and teamen, Foreigners, Indians 
and' Negroes under a department known as Independent and direct Missions. 
Co-operative Missions is the work carried on by the Board in co-operation 
with the various State Boards in the work of enlistment, etc. 

The department of Evangelism under the supervision of Dr. E. A. Fuller 
promises to be one of the most fruitful and far reaching parts of our work. 

The .departments of church extension. Mountain Schools and Cuba and 
Panama all call for our earnest prayers and deepest interest. 

The Southern Baptist S'anatorium is in a most prospercus condition and 
gives promise of largely increased service in the near future. 

The department of publicity is being emphasized a-new. Leaflets and 
Tracts on every phase of the work are to be had for the asking. 

We urge the importance of regular and special prayer for Home Missions 
and that by the use of Tracts, Leaflets and Home and Foreign Fields we 
endeavor to increase interest in our Home Mission work. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. M. THOMAS. 



REPORT ON OBITUARIES. 

Death during the year has removed from our membership 35. Among 
them was Bro. T. B Lanier, of the Cumberland Union Church. Brother 
Lanier was deacon and leader in his church, liberal in support of the Lord's 
cause and was for many years a member of the Executive Board of our 
Association. 

Brother J. E. Deal, of the Angier Church, was another of our loyal mem- 
bers to pass away during the year. 

These all remind us that we must also soon pass the way they have trav- 
eled and that we owe them a debt of gratitude for the foundations they have 
laid for us in establishing the Kingdom of God on earth. 

Let us hold sacred their memory and profit by their lives. 

H. Y. SMITH, Committee. 



18 FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION. 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

The Little River Woman's Missionary Union held its twentieth annual 
meeting with the Angier Baptist Church, August 26, 1926. 

THURSDAY MORNING. 

The opening devotional was led by Miss Ada Overby. Roll called, and re- 
port of Societies given. Miss Mattie Bain reported the work of the Superin- 
tendent and we are glad to note that there has been an increase of four 
Societies during the past year. Miss Dorothy Kellam was present and con- 
gratulated the young people of the Little River Association most heartily 
upon winning the banner for making the largest per centage of A-1 Socie- 
ties during the year, and exhorts them to take it again next year. Follow- 
ing this she brought a message on "Faithfulness in Service," which was 
truly a message from God. Next was a message in song by Misses Hatcher 
and Canaday of Dunn. 

We were happy indeed to have Miss Macy Cox, Superintendent of the 
Wilmington Division present, who brought an inspiring message in regard 
to the work of each of the organizations of .the church. 

After the appointment of committees the meeting adjourned until 2:30. 

Benediction by pastor of Church Rev. A. S. Gillespie. 

AFTERNOON SES'SION. 

Upon re-assembling the devotional exercises were conducted by Mrs. G. 
T. Noel. 

Miss Macy Cox gave a very interesting talk on tithing. 

Mrs. H. A. Page told us about the new things of the W. M. U. Training 
School in a most interesting way concluding with a splendid message or 
Mission Study. 

Miss Foy O'Quinn told about the Baptist Bible Institute stressing the 
practical activities of the school. 

Mrs. Joel G. Layton presented "World Comrades" in a very pleasing way. 

The pastor, Rev. Gillespie, congratulated the women and young people 
upon their zeal and faithfulness in the Kingdom work with a strong appeal 
to go forward in this splendid work. 

The Committee on Nominations offered the following report which was 
adopted: Miss Mattie Bain, S'uperintendent; Mrs. Joel G. Layton, Young 
People's Leader; Mrs. M. A. Edge, Mission Study Chairman; Mrs. Virginia. 
Bdgerton, Personal Service Chairman, and Miss Mabel Burt, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

The report on Time and Place was also adopted and we meet with Lilling- 
ton Baptist Church the last Thursday in August, 1927. 

The Union gav« a vote of thanks to the ladies of Angier Church for their 
cordial hospitality, then sang "Blest be the tie that binds," followed by the 
benediction by Mrs Joel G. Layton. 

MIS3 MATTIE BAIN, Superintendent. 

Foy O'QUINN, Secretary Protem. 



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TABLE 2— FINANCIAL 



For Support of Local Church Work 



Churches. 






Sffl 



It 













o 








aR 






c 


«=^.» 


§ 


o 


c 


>.• VI 


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OO 



Augier ......... 

Autioch 

Baptist Chapel. 
Baptist Grove. . 
Bethel 



$ 600 
7^10 
150 
300 
100 



.$60.001$' 



76. 
100, 



20|.$. 
001 



I 64.54 



Broadway | 


525.00] 13.50 


40.00 




Buie's Creek... 1 


600. 00] 100. 00 


100.00 




Chalybeate Spgsj 


000.00] 24. W) 


16.00 






400.00] 

175. Of)] 


111.25 


47.01 


Cumberlond Un.| 









3O0O.OO|52O.0<l 
1355.00 


475.92 


262.81 


Er\yin 


155.00 


1.-0..35 


Friendship , 1 


800.00] 


109.50 




Holly Springs..] 


750.00] 25.85 


40.00 


.308.50 


Kenuebec ! 


84.00 




31.00 


Lillington | 


SOO. 00 120.00 


175.00 


110. .-6 


Macedonia 1 


154.00 20.00 


31.00 


2.7.:) 


Neill's Creek...] 


300.00 




400.00 


Oak Grove | 


125.00] 


10.00 




Piney Grove ] 


608.14 




5400.. 38 


Rawles | 


150.00] 


17.50 


116. 0;i 


Swann's Station] 


300.00] 


75.00 


50.00 



Totals 112876. 



14|883.35] 1596.91] 6883.39 



.n8.60]$ 



6 

300 . 

22 

14. 



■1 
.50] 
00] 
,65] 
40] 

I 

621.40] 

1 

77.35] 

5.00] 

5.00] 

108.29] 



I 1 

70.00|$ ]$ 7, 

44.04] 15.00| 9 

12.00| ] 

47.70] 9.00] 



100 
20 



••I 
••I 
50] 

•••I 
53] 



3 
3 
3 

64.38i I 5 

300.00]'l50.00] 10 

87.94] 68.75J 7 

85.69] 

12.00] 

399.12] 60.50 
193.36] 5.00 

90.65] ] 10. 

56.00] 21.72] 8. 

18.00] ] 5, 

19.95] 14.00] 10. 

38.79] ] 5, 

] ] 7. 

] 11.00] 6. 

108. 43( 27.61| 10. 

40.00] 26.00] 2, 

33.801 1 6. 



00] $'26. 70 

.00] 

,00] 

,00 



.00| 

.|[lO] 197.621 

,00]201.74| 

.50] ] 

00] 61.50] 

00] 67.00] 

,00 

00 

00 

35] 

.00] 

,00] 

.00] 

50] 

00] 

00] 

.001 



113.35] 
169.65] 

5.00] 



2.251 



00] 60.00] 



855.50 
868.04 
165.00 
424.24 
103.00 

1761.73 

1126.84 

727.85 

257.00 

5476.13 

2013.36 

1087.50 

1215.42 

143.00 

253.79 
707.50 
155.00 
6155.63 
348.50 
545.33 



1300.22] 1721. 85]408. 58)145. 35]904. 81] 24281.36 



TABLE No. _:— FINANCIAL>— (Continued.) 



For Support of Missions, Education and Benevolence 



CHURCH. 



IBs 

O) c; 5 



<v xn 



a; .2 

a m 



"d o 
IS ci C 



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C K 



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$ 166.48|$ 

498.951 . 

50.00|. 

17.301. 

23.00] . 

135. 00| 

1051.381 



lO.OOi 



Angler 

Antiocli 

Baptist Chapel. . 
Baptist Grove. . . 

Bethel 

BroadAvay 

Buie's Creek. . . 

Chalybeate Spr'gsj 466. 98J 84.95J 

Coats I 265.21] 28.221 16.47 

Cumberland Union] 60.00] ] 

Dunn 1 2481 . l8[302 . 78] .17 . 50 

Erwin j 152.35] ] 

Friendship ... 
Holly Springs 
Kennebec .... 



$20.35 



Lillington 

Macedonia 

Neill's Creek. . . . 

Oak Grove 

Piney Grove. . . . , 

Rawles 

Swann's Station, 



5.00 



229.34 

568. 52j j 

10.31| ] 

508.42] ] 

9.00] 12.00] 

32.70] ] 

I ] 3.15 

57.62] 14.98] 12.40 

21.80] ] 

88.50] I 



20.00 



10.2.- 



7.81 



5.0'> 



2.00 
2.10 



10.50 



Total I 6034.54]452.93j 54.52] 58.01 



.83 



6.50 



135 
25 
64 



I I- 

■■\% i-l 

31] 13.30] 
00] I' 

33] |. 



57, 
300 
105, 
137, 

23, 

1188. 

113, 

70 

110 

8, 

80, 

15 



10.001, 



i 25.22] ] 13.70 



41.75], 
5.00! 



.00]. 
.35] 



29.33 



35. 
"25.55" 



] 5.00 

6.64] 10.00| 

I i 

2.50] 



186, 

647 

75 

101 



192 
I, 1371 

667 

] 505 

83 

4039. 

270, 

299 

678 
18, 

588 
46 
32, 
21 

197, 



83].$ 
56| 
00] 
63] 

••I 
20] 
,38] 
48] 
82] 
00] 
83] 
99] 
95] 
521 
31] 
42] 
00] 
70] 
15] 
091 



I [ 137.30] 



1045 

1515 

240 

525 

125 

1044 

3033 

1794 

1233 

340 

9515, 

2284 

1087 

1893 

161, 

1357 

299 

740 

176 

6352 

370 

68-2 



.38 

.eo 

.00 
.87 
.00 
.20 
.11 
.32 
.67 
.00 
.91 
.35 
.50 
.94 
.31 
.80 
.79 
.20 
.15 
.72 
.30 
.30 



80] 

35 1 104. 41 1 15.00] 13. 70] 10161. 16] 35819.37 



SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTORY OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 





« (^ c 






CHURCHES. 


ki 


SUPERINTENDENTS AND 
POST OFFICES. 


SECRETARIES AND 
POST OFFICES. 


rrr 









Angler 

Antioch . 

Baptist Chapel 

Baptist Grove. . . . . . 

Bethel 

Broadway 

Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs. 

Coats 

Cumberland Union , 

Dunn 

Erwin 

Friendship 

Holly Springs 

Kennebec . .^ 

Lillington 

M'acedonia 

Neill's Creek 

Oak G'rove 

Piney Grove 

Rawles 

Swann's Station . . , 



T ! W. M. Morgan, Angler 

Co W. J. Brown, Mamers 

Co lA. L. Smith, Jonesboro, R. 2.... 
Co I J. H. Rogers, Fuquay Springs.. 
Co JG. A. Matthews, Manchester.... 

Y iW. M. Thomas, Broadway 

Y il. M'. AVallace, Bnie's Creek 

Y Paul Bradley, Varina, R. 1 

Y ijirbin Smith, Coats 

Co iW. F. Lanier, Fuquay Springs... 

C M. M. Jernigan, Dunn 

T W. Y. Eyers, Erwin 

T J. MVD. Parker, Erwin ', 

Co Jas. A. Buchanan, Broadway. R-2 
Co IB. W. Adams, Willow Springs.., 

T ! J. F. Loving, Lillington 

Co JA. S. Austin, Holly Springs 

Co jW. T. Campbell, Cardenas 

Co jA. H. Denton, Angler, R. 2 

Co R. L. Wilkins, Holly Springs, R.2 
Co jj'. F. Sherman, Fuquay Springs 

Y C. R. Graham, Jonesboro, R. 3.. 



Mrs. L. E. Johnson, Angier. 
Lola O'Quinn, Mamers. 
J. R. Howard, Jonesboro, R. 2. 
Bridger Gravette, Fuquay Springs 
Mrs. C. McCorquodale, Manchester 
H. M. Thomas, Broadway. 
French Baker, fiuie's Creek. 
Tyson Matthews, Chalybeate Sp'gs 



Morris Weathers, Varina, R. 1. 
L. L. Reardon, Dunn. 

C. H. Avery, Erwin, 

Mrs. 0'. L, Byrd, Bunnlevel. 

D. P. Patterson, Broadway, R. 2 
M. B. Adams, Willow Springs. 

J. E. Womble, Lillington. 

Roy Weathers, Holly Springs, R.2 

A. L. Johnson, Liriington. 

Leslie Turlington, Coats. 

Leo Betts, Fuquay Springs, R. 1. 



Miss Daisy Graham, Jonesboro,. 3 



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THE LITTLE RIVER 


BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 






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Bethel 

Broadway V 

Buie's Creel? V 

Chalybeate Springs... V 

Coats V 

Cumberland Union 

Dunn C 

Erwin T 

Friendship T 

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Kennebee Co 

Lillinaton T 

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Oak Grove 

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12 
"267 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 




52nd ANNUAL SESSION 



■HELD WITH- 



Chalybeate Springs Baptist Church, 
NOVEMBER 9-10, 1927. 



The next session meets at Angier, N. C, November 7 and 
8, 1928; first session 9:30 a. m., 

Introductory sermon — ^Jesse Blalock; Lillingtcn, N. C, 



1 9 a T 



MINUTES 



OF THE- 



Fifty-Second Annual Session 



-OF THE- 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 



-HELD WITH- 



Chalybeate Springs Baptist Church, 
NOVEMBER 9-10, 1927. 



Moderator— J. C. Clifford, Dunn, N. C. 

Vice-Moderator — B. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

Clerk-Treasurer — J. A'. Campbell , Buie's Creek, N. C. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Printers and Binders 

1927 



ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

J. E. Ayscue Buie's Creek, N. G 

J. D. Betts Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

Jesse Blalock Lillington, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

W. T. Campbell Varina, R. F .D., N. C. 

W. C. Dowd Manchester, N. C. 

J. A. Hudson Angler N. C. 

E. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

A. C. McCall .Erwin, R. F. D., N. C. 

?. T. Morris Buie's Creek, N. C. 

B. F. Mauldwin Buie's Creek, N. C. 

S. C. Page Dunn, R. F. D. 4, N. C. 

S. A. Rhyne Erwin, N. C. 

T. Y. Seymour Buie's Creek, N. C. 

F. G. Womack Carrboro, N. C. 

NON-RE SIDENrr PAS'TORS. 

R. E. Atkins. Raleigh, Route 4, N. C. 

T. B. Davis Zebulon, N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD. 

L. H. Campbell, B. P. Gentry, Dr. C. D. Bain, Mrs. C. D. Bain. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

J. C. Clifford, J. A. Campbell, J. W. Byrd, J. M. Byrd, C. W. Flower'?, 
C. W. Matthews, H. Y. Smith. 



ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES. 
State Missions — J. M. Byrd. 
Home Missions — J. E. Ayscue. 
Foreign Missions — ^S. A. Rhyne. 
Orphanage — T. B. Davis. 
Co-operative Program — E. N. Johnson. 



TRUSTEES CAMPBELL COLLEGE. 

Time Expiring 1928 — Santford Martin, Winstcn-S'alem; D. H. Senter, 
Chalybeate Springs; Miss Mattie Bain, Coats; W. K. Rand, D'urham; Mrs. 
I. M. Wallace, Buie's Creek. 

Time Expiring 1929— J. C. Clifford, Dunn; G. F. Pope, Dunn; D. B. Tea pie, 
Sanford; Z. T. Kivett, Buie's Creek; R. G. Taylor, Dlinn. 

Time Expiring 1930— B. F. McLeod, Buie's Creek; B. Townsend, Murfrees- 
boro; J. E. Lanier, Calypso; W. S. S'trickland, Dunn; B. P. Gentry, Lillington. 

Time Expiring 1931 — J. M. Byrd, Coats; Fred. N. Day, Winston-Salem; 
E. H. Ballentine, Varina;; C. H. Norris, Gary; Alonzo Parrish, Benson. 



PROCEEDINGS, 



Chalybeate Springs^ N. C, 
Wedi^esday^ E"oveinber 9, 1927. 

The fiftj-second session of the Little Eiver Baptist Association 
met with Chalybeate Springs Baptist Church, date above mentioned, 
9 :30 A. M. 

The devotional exercises are conducted by Bro. J. D. Betts, who 
reads thirteenth chapter of I Corinthians. 

In the absence of the Moderator and the Yice-Moderator, the Asso- 
ciation is called to order by Clerk J. A. Campbell. The roll call of 
the churches shows eighteen churches represented. 

On motion, Kev. E. E". Johnson is elected Moderator protem, who 
completed the enrollment of delegates and invited visiting brethren 
to seats. The following visitors report : Rev. J. E. Lanier, Eastern 
Association; Eev. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh Association; Dr. M. L. 
Kesler, representing the Thomasville Orphanage; Rev. W. M. Gil- 
more, representing the General Board. 

The new pastors are introduced : T. B. Davis, Chalybeate Springs ; 
S. A. Rhyne, Erwin; J. A. Hudson, Angier; Jesse Blalock, Lil- 
lington. 

On motion, the Clerk is instructed to cast the vote of the Associa- 
tion for J. C. Clifford for Moderator, and Rev. E. E". Johnson, for 
Vice-M;oderatoT. On motion, the vote of the body is cast for J. A. 
Campbell for Clerk-Treasurer. 

J. A. Campbell reads the report of the Program Committee and, 
en motion, it is adopted for the order of business as follows: 

PROGRAM OF LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION FOR 1927. 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9TH. 

9:30 a.m. — Devotional — J. D. Betts. 
10:00 a.m. — Organization. 

10:15 a.m.— Baptist Literature— F. G. Britt, J. S. Farmer. 
10:45 a.m.— Temperance — A. C. McCall, D. H. S'enter. 
11:00 a.m. — Sermon — E. N. Johnson. 

DINNER. 

1:00 p.m. — Devotional — Jesse Blalock. 

2.30 p.m.— Education— Henderson Steele, B. P. Marshbanks. 

2:00 p.m. — Centennial Campaign. 

2:30 p.m. — ^Orphanage — Miss Mattie Biain, R. E. Atkins. 



6 FIFTY-SIECOND ANNUAL SESSION 

3:00 p.m. — Hospitals — Mrs. J. G. Layton, Dr. S. A. Duncan. 

7:30 p.m. — Devotional — J. A. Hudson. 

8:00 p.m. — S'tate Missions — M. M. Jernigan, J. A. McLeod. 

Home Missions — E. M. Slaughter, J. C. Clifford. 

Foreign Missions — B. P. Gentry, S. E. Ayers. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER lOTH. 

9:30 a.m.— Devotional— T. B. Davis. 

10:00 a.m.— B. Y. P. U.— B. F. McLeod, T. B. Davis. 

10:^0 a.m. — Sunday Schools — B. P. Marshbanks, J. E. Ayscue. 

11:00 a.m. — Woman's Work — S. A. Rhyne, E. N. Johnson. 

11:30 a.m.— Aged Ministers — C. W. Flowers, J. D. Betts. 

12.00 a.m. — Obituaries — J. M. Byrd, General Discussion. 

12:30 a.m. — Reports of Committees and etc. 
First named to write the report, second one to open discussion. 

J. A. CAMPBELL 
J. C. CLIFFORD, Committee. 

DELEGATES AND VISITORS ENROLLED. 

Angler — W. M. Morgan, Mrs. W. H. Stephenson, C. W. Flowers, Mrs. C. 
W. Flowers, J. A. Hudson, Mrs. J. A. Hockaday. 

Antioch — F. J. McLean. 

Baptist Chapel — J. M. Dickens, Mrs. J. T. Thomas, Mrs. J. M. Dickens, 
A. L. Smith, J. L. Thomlas. 

Baptist Grove — Letter only. 

Bethel— J. A. West, G. W. Matthews, Arnold West, Alice West, Anna Belle 

West. 

Broadway — Mrs. Beulah Thomas, W. M. Thomas, Mrs. H. M. Thomas, Mrs. 
C. E. Thomas, C. E. Thomas, Mrs. D. J. Thomas, J. M. B. Thomas, Attie R. 
Kelly. 

Buie's Creek — J. A. Campbell, Mrs. Rex Johnson, Rex Johnson, Mrs. J. F. 
Blackman, J. F. Blackman, Mrs. W. H. Hatcher, Mrs. J. T. Bland, W. H. 
Hatcher. 

Chalybeate Springs—T. B. Davis, Geo. D. Campbell, C. K. S'mith, D. H. 
Senter, Paul Bradley, A. A. Johnson. 
Coats— J. M. Byrd. 

Cumberland Union — J. S. Brown, J. O. Weathers. 
Dunn — E. N. Johnson, Mrs. J. B. Holland. 

Erwin— S*. A. Rhyne, M. C. Brown, J. H. McKee, J. B. Sessoms, Thomas 
Mc. N. Byrd, A. W. Byrd. 

Friendship— A. C. McCall, Mrs. A. C. McCall, C. M. Babbs, J. H. Allen, 
C. L. Avery. 

Holly Springs — J. D. Patterson, Mrs. M. C. Thomas, Earlie Thomas, M. J. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 7 

Thomas, M. C. Thomas, H. Y. Smith, R. T. S'mith, Mrs. M. J, Thomas, Mrs. 
H. Y. Stoith, J. E. Ayscue. 
Kennebec — ^Letter only. 

Lillington — Henderson Stteele, Mrs. Joel G. Layton, Mrs. Jesse Blalock, 
Jesse Blalock, Mrs. J. B. Tugwell, B. D. Bunn. 

Macedonia— J. E. Holt, Mrs. J. E. Holt, J. C. Austin, S. T. Morris, J. C. 
Smith, Mrs. Ruth Austin, J. D. Wheeler, Mrs. Lena Weathers, Miss Irene 
Weathers, Miss Rosa Brown. 

Neill's Greek — Mrs. H'. Morgtan, J. H. Morgan, J. W. Matthews, 

Oak Grove— N. I. Reardon, J. D. Betts. 

Piney Grove- T. E. Smith, R. E. Atkins, Mrs, O. D. Lyon, O. D. Lyon, R.* 
E. Austin, Mrs. R. E. Austin, W. A. Mason, W. B. Jones, W. L. Morris, M. D. 
Honeycutt, H. O. Austin, Mrs. H. O. Austin, Miss Edith Betts, Miss Cleota 
Betts, J. L. Howell, Miss Lucy Howell. 

Rawles — ^Letter only. 

Slwann— C. R. Graham, J. G. Spivey, L. G. Holt. 

VISITORS'. 
Mrs. R. E. Atkins, W. M. Gilmore J. S. Farmer, Raleigh Association; M. 
L. Kesler, Thomasville Orphanage; John E. Lanier, Calypso, N. C. 

The report on Baptist Literature is read and, on motion to adopt, 
the report is discnssed by Rev. J. S. Farmer, Manager of the Bib- 
lical Recorder. 

Bro. A. C. McCall reads the report on Temperance and the report 
is adopted after being discnssed by Bro. D. H. Senter. 

The Association sermon is preached by Pastor E. X. Johnson, of 
Dnnn. 

Benediction by Bro. Tvesler and the Association adjonrns one honr 
for dinner, which is S]>read on the chnrch gronnds. 



AFTERA^OON. 

The devotional exercises are conducted by Rev. Jesse- Blalock, 
"The faith that overcomes", based on "Let ns go np and possess it 
for we are well able." 

The reports on Edncation and the Centennial Campaign are read 
and both snbjects discnssed together by C. W. Shinn, W. M. Gilmore 
and J. A. Campbell. Report adopted. 

Rev. R. E. Atkins reads the report on the Orphanage and, on mo- 
lion to adopt, the report is discnssed by Brethren Atkins and M. L. 
Xesler. 

Mrs. J. G. Layton reads the report on Hospitals and, after discns- 



« FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL SESSION 

sion by Mrs. Layton, W. M. Gilmore and M. L. Kesler, by motion, 
the report is adopted. 

Tbe roll of churches is called and the goals for the Co-operative 
program set for 1928 amounting to $9,400.00 as follows: 

GOALS FOR 1928 

Angier $ 350 . 00 Dunn 3000 . 00 

AntiocJi 650.00 Friendship 450.00 

Baptist Chapel 75.00 Holly Springs 600.00 

Baptist Grove 50 . 00 Kennehec 50 . 00 

Bethel 50.00 Lillington 500.00 

Broadway 150 . 00 Macedonia 100 . 00 

Buie's Creek 1200.00 Neill's Creek 100.00 

Chalybeate S'prings 650.00 Oak Grove 50.00 

Coats 600.00 Piney Grove 150.00 

Cumberland Union 50.00 Rawles 50 . 00 

Erwin 400.00 S wann's Station 125 . 00 

On motion, Eev. T. B. Davis, Zebulon, is elected Orphanage repre- 
sentative for next year and Eev. E. ]^^. Johnson, Dunn, representa- 
tive for the Co-operative Program. 

The Moderator announces the folloAving committee to report on 
time, place and preacher for the next Association. 

The motion is made and carried that the same committee deter- 
mine places for the Union meetings for the ensuing year and recom- 
mend the members for Executive Board, the Sunday School Board, 
delegates to Ba]^tist State CoTivention, Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion, &c. 

Committee: C. W. Elowers, D. IT. Senter and H. Y. Smith. 

On motion the Association adjourns until the evening session. 

Benediction by Bro. Ayscue. 

EYEXTA^O SESSTO^^. 

The devotional exercises are conducted by Bro. J. A. Hudson. 

The reports on State ]\Tissi(uis and Home ]\rissions are read, with 
]/rivilege of adding the re]>oi't on Eoroigu Missions later, and, on 
motion to adojit, Bro S. E. Ayers, returned Missionary from China, 
discusses tbe subject of Eoi'eisu ^Fissions and Bro. ,Y^. l\r. Gilmore 
discusses ihe Co-operative Program. 

On motion tbe Association adjourns until to-morrov morning, 
9 :?>0. 

Benediction by Bro. Ehyne. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION » 

THURSDAY MORNING 

November 10. 

The devotional services are conducted by Bro. Theo. B . Davis wbo 
reads part of the sixth chapter of Ephesians. Prayer by Bro. J. D. 
Wheeler. 

Brethren J. A. Hudson and T. B. Davis discuss the B. Y. P. U. 
workj report to be given later. 

Bro. Henderson Steele reads the report on Education, v^hich v^as 
adopted, the subject having been discussed yesterday. 

The report on Sunday Schools was not ready, but the subject is 
discussed by Brethren J. S. Earmer, J. A. Hudson, E. N. Johnson 
and Theo. B. Davis. 

Bro. S. A. Rhyne reads the report on Woman's AVork and the sub- 
ject is discussed by Bro. E. N. Johnson. Report adopted. 

The report on Aged Ministers is read by Bro. C W. Flowers and 
is discussed by Bro. J. D. Betts. Report adopted. 

Bro. J. M. Byrd spoke briefly in memory of our dead and the Clerk 
is instructed to insert in the Minutes the names of the dead reported 
in the letters. 

The Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for next Association^ 
with other duties committed to them, reports and their report is 
adopted. 

On motion of Bro. S. A. Rhyne, the x\ssnciation extends a rising 
vote of thanks to the Chalybeate Springs Church and community 
for its bounteous hospitality in entertaining this Association. 

After singing, ''God be with you till we meet again", the Associa- 
tion ajdourns to meet next year at Angier. 

Prayer by Bro. S. A. Rhyne. , 

E. N. JoHNSox. Yice-Aroderator. 
J. A. Campbet.l, Clerk. 



10 FIFTY-S'ECOND ANNUAL SESSION 



A WORD PERSOIsTAL. 



On the second day of the Association the writer was called away 
from the meeting. I thought I gathered np all the records and re- 
ports. The Minutes for the second day's session were sent to me. 
When I came to write up the records for the printer, I ^Yas unable 
to find the reports on : 

Baptist Literature. 
Or2>hanage. 
Hospitals. 
State Missions. 
Home ]\ Fissions. 



ir m 



Either the writers did not leave the reports with the Clerk o] 
some way they have been mislaid. In either case, I am very sorry, 
but am unable to help it. Pressed with many duties and responsi- 
bilities, trying also to locate these missing re])orts, I have also been 
delayed in getting copy for Minutes in the Printer's hands. 

J. A. Campbell. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 11 

WRITERS AND SPEAKERS FOR 1928. 

Order of Business — J. A. Hudson, William Morgan. 

Baptist Literature — H. Y. S'mith, J. S. Parmer. 

State Missions — D. H. Senter, .S A. Rhyne. 

Home Missions — B. P. Gentry, J. E. Ayscue. 

Foreign Missions — J. A. Hudson, E. N. Johnson. 

Education— J. C. Clifford, T. Y. S'eymour. 

Aged Ministers — J. F. Blackman, J. R. Baggett. 

Hospitals — Miss Mattie Bain, A. C. McCall. 

Orphanage— F. iG-. Britt, Theo. B. Davis. 

Temperance — M. M. Jernigan, J. A. McLeod. 

Woman's Work — Mrs. J. G. Layton, Jesse Blalock. 

Sunday Schools — Henderson Steele, B. P. Marshbanks. 

B. Y. P. U.— Miss Zula Rogers, B. D. Bunn. 

Obituaries — C. W. Flowers, 

First named to write the report, second one to open the discussion. 

REPORT ON APPOINTMENTS. 

Your Committee on Appointments recommend: 

1. That the Association meet at Angier November 7 and 8, 1928, and that 
Rev. Jesse Blalock preach the Associational sermon. 

2. That J. A. Hudson and William Morgan prepare Order of Business. 

3. That the first Union Meeting be held at Friendship, January 28, A. C. 
McCall and J. McD. Parker to prepare program. 

4. That the Siunday School Convention meet at Lillington April 28, Sunday 
S'chool Board to prepare program. 

5. That the second Union meeting be held at Neill's Creek, July 2, A. C. 
McCall and J. H. Morgan to prepare program. 

6. That J. M. Byrd be the representative for State Missions; J. E. Ayscue 
for Home Missions; S. A. Rhyne, Foreign Missions; T. B. Davis, Orphanage; 
E. N. Johnson, Co-operative Program. 

7. Delegate to State Convention — A. C. McCall; to S'outhern Baptist Con- 
vention — J. A". Hudson. 

8. Sunday School Board— L. H. Campbell, B. P. Gentry, Dr. C. D. Bain, 
Mrs. C. D. Bain. 

9. Executive Board— J. C. Clifford, J. A. Campbell, J. M. Byrd, J. W. Byrd, 
C. W. Matthews, C. W. Flowers and H. Y. S'mith. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. H. SENTEIR, 

C. W. FLOWERS, 

H. Y. SMITH. Committee. 



12 



FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL SESSION 



FUNDS SENT TO THE ASSOCIATION IN 1927 



Angier 

Antioch 

Baptist Chapel . . . . , 

Baptist Grove 

Bethel 

Broadway 

Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate S'prings . 
Cumberland Union. 

Dunn 

Erwin 

Friendship , 

Holly S'prings 

Kennebecj 

Lillington 

Macedonia 

Neill's Creek' 

Oak Grove 

Piny Grove 

Rawles 

Swann's Station. . . . 



Total 



Minute Fund. 


Convention Objects 


$ 7.50 


$... . 


8.00 






3.00 




. . 


3.50 


20 


05 


3.00 






5.00 




. . 


10.00 


. 


, . 


7.50 


67 


00 


3.00 


10 


00 


25.00 




. . 


5.00 


. 


. , 


10.00 






8.35 


20 


00 


10.00 






5.00 


30 


00 


7.50 


52 


81 


6.00 




. . 


10.00 


. 


. . 


2.00 




. . 


6.00 


• 





$145.35 $199.86 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Treasurer. 



REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 



I. In the year of Nineteen Hundred and Eight, the people of North Caro- 
lina outlawed the liquor business. Also for more than seven years the 
Eighteenth Amendment, has been in effect, but in a large measure the people 
have talked prohibition, elections, and amendments, crying peace, peace 
when there was no peace. Less than two weeks ago on the streets of Ra- 
leigh, some women, with a petition were canvassing the city, asking for the 
sale of wine and strong drink. It may truthfully be said that if the enemies 
of liquor had worked as hard to enforce the laws we now have, as the friends 
of the traffic have to keep them from being enforced and to do away with 
them, many of the present day evils would be unknown. 

The wealthiest of our people who drink think that prohibition is for the 
poor people. Many of the prominent people of our churches, in word might 
condemn the liquor business, but altogether too many of them forget their 
condemnation of this curse, while on fishing trips and social gatherings. 
Ofttimes, those whose duty it is to drive it out, are in such places. 

Our young men are buying and drinking liquor. In every community it 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 13 

is being sold, and sometimes made by our own people of Harnett county. 

In a day like this, our Baptist people ought to be found at the front. We 
believe in law and order. We urge our people to abstain from the use of 
liquor, to be good citizens and good Christians, and to strive in all honorable 
ways as the servants of God to wipe out this evil. Napoleon, looking on his 
hungry, ragged, discouraged soldiers, said, "Forty centuries look down on 
us," and we today ought to think of the future, and from our pulpits, and 
from the pew we cry out against this evil. 

II. If this evil was all that we have to think about, as bad as it is we 
would be much better off than we are, but we have the making of the Sab- 
bath day a holiday instead of a Holy day. Filling stations are kept open 
all day. The sign, -"We never close" is to be seen often. We will never be 
able to teach our children respect for the Sabbath, in Sunday School, un- 
less we do our part to make it impossible for them to go direct to open 
stores from their classes. We ought to try to cry out in uncertain tones 
against this evil. We shall most certain make enemies by so doing, but 
better be God's man than the friend of men. 

III. Then there is the social evil, bad as the other two that I have men- 
tioned. They foster this last evil. Jesus said thpre was such a thing as 
making a person more the child of the devil. If the waywardness of some 
of our young people, the breaking up of the homes, the increase of the di- 
vorce evil, the spread of bad literature is not met, and met soon with the 
gospel, which we believe we have rightly interpreted, we need not look for 
any better times. 

IV. Never in any time I have known or read of, was there as much care- 
lessness on the part of the people concerning religion as now. The best of 
our Evangelists say it has been the hardest year they ever saw. We can 
never hope to win the lost for Christ, and His Kingdom, until we are awake 
and aggressive, fighting these evils, which are eating out the very fiber of 
that which we must appeal to. A. C. McCALL, Committee 

REPORT ON EDUCATION. 

Inasmuch as his subject is uppermost in the minds of North Carolina 
Baptists just now, by reason of the fact that the campaign is in full swing 
for the raising of a million and a half dollars to eliminate the outstanding 
debt on our Colleges, we feel that Education will be discussed fully, and we 
trust freely, in this session of Little River Association. The Centennial 
Campaign is a very important matter with us right now. In order that our 
Association may meet its quota, it is the duty of every member of the church- 
es on our roll to put forward every effort in that behalf. 

It is not necessary to stress the importance of Christian Education here. 
Our members are fully aware of the urgent necessity that confronts us. 
Nor do we deem it expedient to here recite statistics showing our great obli- 
gation, making comparisons, or enumerating the various items that make 
up our obligation. Suffice it for the present to say that the main character- 



14 FIPTY-SlECOND ANNUAL SESSION 

istic of Baptists is loyialty — loyalty to everything that counts in the up- 
building of the Kingdom. To the end that we may impress upon each and 
every member of our churches the wonderful opportunity, the tremendous 
need for real service, the urgent call for noble service, we simply write in 
this report that those who are known as leaders are working faithfully to- 
ward the goal sought in the Centennial Campaign. But we would impress 
upon the rank and file of our membership that such an obligation as this 
now confronting us cannot be met in whole by the leaders. Every member 
must take on the yoke and devote time and means to the great Oanse. 

We would not be unmindful of the unselfish service that has been given, 
and is now being given, by those who are in charge of our Baptist educa- 
tional institutions. We feel that if every member of our churches might 
get a vision of the splendid work being done, and come to realize its far- 
reaching influence, there would be such a rallying to the cause of Christian 
Education in our midst that we would never again be forced to use urgent 
means to raise funds for our schools. 

While it cannot be said that worldly wealth can be found in the hands 
of the rank and file of our membership, yet we must know, even as we are 
heirs in the Kingdom, that the riches of Heaven are ours. The Baptist 
schools are dear to the hearts of Baptists. Chrsitian education is God's 
cause. Let us be found working in His cause. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENDERSON STEELE, 

For the Committee. 



REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

The woman was first to be overcome by the powers of sin, but she was 
also first to hear the tidings of a Saviour, last to leave Him on the cross 
and then first to witness Him risen. She took the fruit of death, but gladly 
she reaches out her hand to receive the fruit of life. Having been made a 
medium of darkness, she is anxious to be made a medium of light to convey 
the light of that Sun which rose in Eden and set on Calvary, and then rose 
to set no more forever. Touching God through the hand of Faith, she is 
trying to lift the world up to Him. 

The W. M. U. believes in combination. The joining of the effectulal fer- 
vent prayers of the righteous women before the Throne of Grace as the pray. 
ers of one woman. Uniting their influences for the spread of the gospel of 
the Son of God. Giving of their substance in a systematic and sacrificial 
way in order to please Him who said "Freely ye have received, freely give"- 

The W. M. U. believes likewise in progress, knowing that real progress 
comes through acquiring a true knowledge of God and of man. They are 
acquainted with the fact that there must be an assimilation of the knowledge 
received in order to go forward in the field of unselfish service of the Christ, 
being assured by the word of God that if they give expression to the things 
of God in their lives, words and deeds they shall be successful. Thus, 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 15 

through the application of these principles, they have made great progress 
in Grace, numbers and finance. 

The W. M. U. goal is enlistment, information, and transformation. The 
enlistment of every godly woman and all the churches. The impartaticn of 
a full informlation of God's cause to all in the field of service. The trans- 
formation of the hearts, lives and conditions of mankind throughout the 
whole earth until the kingdoms of this world have become the kingdoms of 
our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. 

S. A. RHYNE, Committee. 

REPORT ON MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 

The care of our aged ministers and the widows of deceased ministers is a 
prime obligation upon all the churches; not only a single church but upon 
all the churches as they co-operate in the state and Southern Baptist Con- 
ventions. Nearly a decade ago the S'outhern Baptist Convention assumed 
the responsibility for leadership in this matter, and all the States, with the 
single exception of Missouri, are administering to these veterans of the 
Cross through The Relief and Annuity Board, with headquarters at Dallas, 
Texas. Since the organization of this Board nearly a million dollars has 
boen distributed to the beneficiaries who have been recommended by asso- 
ciational committees and state authorities. The Relief Board cannot do all 
that it would like, it craves to do vastly more — but that which it has been 
enabled to do is by no m.eans to be despised. The funds administered by 
this Board for relief work come from two sources: first, from the gifts 
through the Unified Program; and second, from invested funds. The in- 
vested fund is a little more than $500,000.00, and the gifts from the churches 
amounted last year to a little less than $100,000.00,— A sum far too small 
with which to meet the urgent appeals of really needy ministers and the 
widows of deceased ministers. 

THE ANNUITY FUND. 

The Relief Board has another department of its work, known as the 
Annuity Fund. Nearly thirteen hundred ministers are active members of 
this Fund. They pay a small sum into the treasury of the Relief Board 
annually, and the denomination undertakes to add four dollars for every 
dollar thus contributed by the minister, so that when he reaches the age of 
sixty-eight, he will receive an annual pension of $500.00 so long as he lives, 
and should he break down permanently and totally at any time after his 
membership begins, he receives the same amount annually. Should he die, 
his widow receives $300.00 per year so long as sh« is his widow; and if the 
widow remarries and there are orphan children under twent^^-one years of 
age, the widow's annuity is distributed to them. This is a great boon to the 
ministers who have availed themselves of it, and many ministers and their 



16 FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL SESSION 

widows are now drawing their pensions regularly. The accumulations in 
the treasury of the Relief Board in this Fund, are approximately two mil- 
lion dollars and all of this and much more will be needed to pay the pen- 
sions contemplated by the plan. Ministers in active service who are under 
fifty-nine years of age, and in good health, are eligible to membership in 
this Fund. More of our preachers should avail themselves of its benefits. 

C. W. FLOWERS, Committee. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



17 






OUR DEAD 



ANGIER— 

W. P. SURLES" 

MRS. SARAH MORDON 

ANTIOCH— 

MRS. ANNIE COLLINS' 
J. B. F. STUART 
J. H. BROWN 
BERNTCE ALLEN 

BAPTIST GROVE- 
MRS. HIXIE E. SENTER 



ERWIN— 

R. M. MERRITT 

C. O. WOODWORTH 

HOWARD JOHNSON 

HOLLY SPRINGS- 
MRS'. THELMA S'UG-G 
J. R. WILSON 

LILLINGTON— 

MRS. ALICE McNEILL 
J. A. ROGERS' 



BUJE'S CREEK- 
DEACON WM. HATCHER 
MRS. CATHERINE BNNIS 

CHALBEATE SPRINGS— 
W. A. MATTHEWS 
ROBERT WALTERS 
RUTH DEWAR 

COATS— 

A. B. CURRIN 



OAK GROVE— 

L. L. TURLINGTON 

PINEY GROVE- 
ALEX SMITH 
A. J. MATTHEWS 
W. W. SEAWELL 
CHARLOTTE HOWELL 
DELANEY ROGERS' 
LULA SEAGRAVES 
MAVIS GILBERT 



DUNN— 

E. A. JONES' 

MRS. SUSAN EARLEY 



SWANN'S STATION- 
MRS. MAE GILMORE 
MRS'. ALICE YARBOROUGH 



18 FIFTY-S'ECOND ANNUAL SESSION 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



The Little River Woman's Missionary Union held its twenty-first annual 
meeting with the Lillington Baptist Church, August 25th, 1927. 

THURSDAY MORNING. 

Devotional led by Mrs. W. B. Johnson, 

Opened service by singing, "Jesus Calls Us." 

Prayer by Mrs. W. N. Jones. 

Mrs. Johnson gave an interesting talk on the work in China, Key word, 
"God's Plans and Our Responsibilities." 

Roll call of Societies. 

Report of SYiperintendents. 

Mission Study talk, Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks. Theme, "Study to become 
a perfect workman." 

Mrs. Bonsteel, "God's plan of giving." 

Talk, Mrs. Wesley N. Jones, Ruby Anniversary plans bringing a great 
message on our great needs of Faith, Prayer and Enlistment. Key word, 
the "Master has come and calleth for thee." 

Song, "Have thine own way Lord." 

After the appointment of committees the meeting adjourned to nTeet at 
two o'clock p. m. 

AFTERNOON S'BSSION— BY THE. YOUNG PEOPLE. 

Prelude: "The Old Rugged Cross," by G. A. and R. A. Orchestra. 

Devotional led by G. T. Noel, Jr. 

Duet, "Here am I, send me," Elma Yates and Teddy Martin. 

Reading, Miss Esther Byrd, "Why we should read the Bible." 

"Training for Christian leadership," Miss Zula Rogers. 

Mrs. Johnson, of Soo Chow, China, gave us a real glimpse of life in China 
in idols of worship and clothing. 

Song, "Serve the Lord in Youth," by John Ousley, Hartwell Campbell, 
Hugh Matthews and Chester Ennis. 

Mrs. Pl'arris presented the Biblical Recorder and Missionary Magazine in 
an instructive manner. 

Mrs. Layton made a motion that was approved that two ladies be made 
trustees at Campbell College to co-operate with the work there, Miss Mattie 
Bain to convey this messiage to Dr. Campbell and the Board of Trustees. 

Orchestra, "There is work to do." 

Dunn W. M. U. offers banner for the best all round G. A. and R. A. for 1928. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 19 

The Nominating Committee made the following report: 
Miss Mattie Bain, Superintendent. 
Mrs. Joel Layton, Young People's Leader. 
G. A. and R. A. Camp Director to be appointed. 
Mrs. B. P. Miarshbank, Mission Study Chairman. 
Mrs. Paul Bradley, Personal Service Chairman. 
Mrs. John B. Holland, Secretary. 
On motion the report was adopted. 

Time and Place Committee report Antioch as next meeting place and the 
last Thursday in August, 1928, as the time. Adopted. 

MIS'S MATTIE BAIN, Superintendent. 
MRS. JOHN B. HOLLAND Secretary. 







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LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 



53rd ANNUAL SESSION 

KELiD WITH 

Angler Bapti^ Church, 
NOVEMBER 7-A 1 928 



The next session meets at Antioch, N. C, November 6 and 7, 1929, 
first session 9:30 a. m. 
Introduetory Sermon — J. A. Hudson, Angier, N. C. 



1 9S 8 



cTWINUTES 



OF THE- 



Fifty-Third Annual Session 



-OF THE- 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 

HEliD WITH 

ANGIER BAPTIST CHURCH, 

NOVEMBER 7-8, 1928 



Moderator— J. C. Clifeord Dunn, N. C. 

Vice-Moderator — S. A. Rhyne Erwin, N. C. 

Clerk-Treasurer — J. A. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 



GoWsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Printers and Binder* 

1928 



ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

J. E. Ayscue Buie's Creek, N, C. 

J. D. Beitits Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

W. T. Campbell Varina, R. F. D., N. C. 

W. C. Dowd Manchester, N. C. 

J. A. Hudson Angier, N. C. 

E. N. Johnson Dunn, N. C. 

L. L. Johnson Lillington, N. C. 

S. T. Morris Buie's Creek, N. C. 

B. F. Mauldwin Buie's Creek, N. C. 

S. C. Page . Dunn, R. F. D. 4, N. C. 

S. A. Rhyne Erwin, N. C. 

T. Y. Seymour Buie's Creek, N. C. 

NON-RESlDEiNT PASTORS. 

R. E. Atkins Raleigh, Route 4, N. C. 

T. B. Davis Zebulon, N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD. 

L. H. Campbell, B. P. Gentry, Dr. C. D. Bain, Mrs. C. D. Bain. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

J. C. Clifford, J. A. Campbell, J. W. Byrd, J. M. Byrd, C. W. Flowers, 
C. W. Matthews, H. Y. Smith. 



ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES. 



State Missions — J. M. Byird. 
Home Missions — J. E. Ayscue. 
Foreign Missions — 'S'. A. Rhyne. 
Orphanage — T. B. Davis. 
Co-operative Program — E. N. Johnson. 



TRUSTEES CAMPBELL COLLEGE. 

Time Expiring 1929— J. C. Clifford, Dunn; G. F. Pope, Dunn; D. B. Teague, 
Sanford; William Morgan, Angier; R. G. Taylor, Dunn. 

Time Expiring 1930 — ^B. F. McLeod, Buie's Creek; B. Townsend, Murfrees. 
boro; J. E. Lanier, Calypso; W. S. Strickland, Dunn; B. P. Gentry, Lillington 

Time Expiring 1931 — J, M. Byrd, Coats; Fred N. Day, Winston-Salem; 
E. H. Ballentine, Varina; C. H. Norris, Cary; Alonzo Parrish, Benson. 

Time Expiring 1932 — Santford Martin, Winston-Salem; D. H. Senter, Chaly- 
beate Springs; Miss Mattie Bain, Coats; W. K. Rand, Durham; Mrs. I. M. 
Wallace, Buie's Creek. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Angler, N. C,. Wednesday, Nov. 7, 1928. 

The fifty-third session of the Little River Baptist Association met with 
Angler Baptist Church, date above mentioned, 9:30 a. m. 

The congregation sang, "We're Marching to Zion," and "He leadeth me." 
Further devotional exercises were conduciled by Rev. J. A. Hudson, who took 
as his subject "Testifying for Christ." 

Former Moderator J. C. Clifford called the Association to order. Roll of 
churches called byi Clerk J. A. Campbell and delegates enrolled. 

On motion, the Association proceeded to the election of officers with the 
result : J. C. Clifford, Moderator; S. A. Rhyne, Vice-Moderator; J. A. Camp- 
bell, Clerk-Treasurer. 

Committee on Programme made its report, which was adopted. 

PROGRAMME. 

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7th. 

9:30 a.m.— Devotional — W. M. Morgan. 
10:00 a.m. — Organization. 

10:30 a.m.— Temperance — M. M. Jernigan, J. A. McLeod. 
10:50 a.m. — Baptist Literature— H. Y. Smith, J. S. Farmer. 
11:15 a.m. — ^S'ermon — Rev. T. Y. Seymour. 

DINNER. 

1:15 p.m. — Devotional — Mrs. L. E. Johnson. 

1:30 p.m— State Missions— D. H. Senter, S. A. Rhyne. 

2:00 p.m. — Home Missions — B. P. Gentry, J. E. Ayscue. 

2:20 p.m, — Foreign Missions — J. A. Hudscn, E. N. Johnson. 

Adjournment. 

7:30 p.m.— Devotional — J. M. Byrd. 

7:45 p.m. — Education — J. C. Clifford, T. Y. Seymour. 

8:15 p.m. — ^Sunday Schools — Henderson Steele, B. P. Marshbanks. 

8:45 p.m. — B. Y. P. U. — Miss Zula Rogers, B. D. Bunn. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8th. 

9:30 a.m.— Devotional— Dr. C. D. Bain. 

10:00 a.m.— Orphanage— F. G. Britt, Theo. B. Davis. 

10.30 a.m.^Aged Ministers^J. F. Blackman, J. R. Baggett. 

11:30 a.m. — Hospitals — Miss Mattie Bain, Dr. J. W. Halford. 

11:25 a.m. — Woman's Work— Mrs. J. G. Layton, Mrs. Bonsteel. 

11:45 a.m. — Obituaries — ^C. W. Flowers. 

12:00 m. Reports of Committees, etc. 

J. A. HUDSON, 

W. M. MORGAN, Committee. 

DELEGATES AND VISITORS ENROLLED. 

Angier — H. R. Blalock, J. L. Johnson, James Bullock, J. A. Hudson, C. W, 
Flowers, Reba Flowers, W. M. Morgan. 
Antioch— H. G. Patterson. 
Baptist Chapel — Letter. 
Baptist Grove — Letter. 
Bethel — Letter. 



6 FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL SBS'SION. 

BroadwaY--Lillian Matthews, Mrs. W. M. Thomas, A. A. Collins, Henry 
Thomas. 

Buie's Creek — Mrs. J. A. Cambpell, Mrs. J. N. Gregory, Mrs. T. Y. Seymour, 
Mrs. A. B. Bonsteel, T. Y. Seymour, L. J. Turlington, Mrs. L. J. Turlington, 
Mrs. E. G. Murray, E. G. Murray, J. A. Campbell. 

Chalybeate Springs— C. K. Smith, Theo. B. Davis, Mrs. J. W. Holloway, 
J. W. Holloway, Mrs. Julia Smith, Mrs. J. M. Mangum, Thurston S'mith, 
Mrs, Annie Smith, Cora Smith, G. D. Campbell. 

Coats — Mrs. i.ucy Kelly, Mrs. T. D. Stewart, Alton Grimes, Irbin Smith. 

Cumberland Union— Letter, 

Dunn— J. C. Clifford, E. N. Johnson, Mrs. C. R. Venson, Mrs. S. P. Lee, 
Mrs. E. C. Keller, C. D. Bain. 

Erwin — S. A. Rhyne, J. B. Sessoms, Junius Pollard, J. W. Darrock. 

Frierdship— Mrs. Hubert Pyrd. 

Holly Spring?— Myrtle Thomas. Mrs. W. J. Wilson, Mrs. M. C. Thomas, 
M. 0. Thomas. W. J. Wilson. 

Kennebec — Letter. 

Lrilington— Mrs. M. B. McKinney, Mrs. J. R. Baggett, Mrs. John D. John- 
son, Henderson Steele, Mrs. Allen Shaw^Mrs, L. S. Dossert, Mrs. J. B. Barne?, 
Mrs. J. P. Tugwell. Mrs. Joel G. Lay ton. 

M:^^edcnia— J. F. Holt. 

Neill's Creek— Not reiu^esented. 

Oak Grove— J. R. Pate. 

Piney Grove — Mrs. H. O. Austin. H. O. Austin, Mrs. M. D. Honeycutt, M. 
D, Honeycutt, Ncvie Lee Smith. Mrs. T. E. Smith, T. E. Smith, R. E. Atkins. 

Rawles— D. H. Senter. 

Swann — G. M. Graham, Mrs. D. A. Graham, D. A. Graham, Alberta Graham, 
Bettie Graham. 

The following visiting brethren are welcomed during the session of the 
Association: Dr. R. T. Vann, representing Aged Ministers; Rev. G. T. Mills, 
Raleigh Association; Rev. E. C. Kellar, Mecklenburg-Cabarrus Association; 
Rev. E. X. Gardner, Thomasville Baptist Orphanage; Rev. W. fi. Beach, 
Biblical Recorder; Rev. A. C. McCall, Mount Zion Association; Rev. A. A. 
Pippin, Raleigh Association; Rev. R. E. Atkins, Raleigh Association. 

'f'he report on Baptist Literature is discussed by Rev. W. R. Beach. 

The Associational sei'mon is preached by Rev. T. Y. S'eymour, who chose 
as his text 1st Cor. 6.20: "Ye are not your own." 

The Moderator a])points the Committee on all appointments: D. H. Senter, 
H. G. Patterson, C. W. Flowers. 

On motion, the Association adjourns one hour for lunch. 

Benediction by Dr. Vann. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON. 

Congregation sang "Trust and obey." 

Mrs. L. E. Johnson conducts the devotional exercises. 

On motion, the night session is dispensed with, i)lachig the programme 
forward for to-morrow. 

D. H, Senter reads the report on State Missions, B. P. Gentry offers rejx^rt 
on Home Missions, J. A. Hudson the report on Foreign Missions. 

On motion to adopt S. A. Rhyne discusses State Missions, J. E. Ayseue 
Home Missions and R. T. Vann Foreign Missions and the Co-operative Pro- 
gram. 

On motion, the Association adjourns until to-morrow 9:30 a. m. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION. 7 

THURSDAY MORNING. 

Congregation sang, "More Love to Thee, O Christ." 

Vice-Moderator S. A. Rhyne presided during the day. 

Dr. C. D. Bain, Dunn, conducts tlie devotional exerciser, reading the thir- 
teenth chapter of Corintliians I. 

The Orphanage report is prepared by Bro. E. N. Gardner and discussion 
by Revs. T. B. Davis and E. N. Gardner follows. 

The subject of Aged Ministers is discussed by R. T. Vann, Secretary, and 
T. B. Davis. 

On motion, the Association adjourns one hour for lunch. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

"All hail the power of Jesus' Name'' is sung. The epori ^n Hospitals is 
read and, after discussion by R. T. Vann, on motion, ihe report is adopted. 

Mrs. J. G. Layton reads the report on Woman's Worh ; nd ifter discussion 
by Mrs. Abbie Bonsteel, the report is adopted. 

The subject of Education is discussed by J. A. Campbell and Mrs. Bon- 
steel, the report to be inserted, if received before Minutes are printed. 

The reports on B.Y.P.U. and Sunday Schools are not in hand. On motion, 
the Clerk is instructed to insert these reports, if received in time. 

Bro. C. W. Flowers reads the repoirt on Obituaries and special tributes 
are paid Dr. R. L. Warren and Mrs. Ella J. Draughon, of the Dunn church, 
by Rev. E. N. Johnson, and Deacon Z. T. Kivett, of the Buie's Creek church, 
by J. A.' Campbell. 

On motion, the following goal is set for the Co-operative Program for 1929. 

GOALS FOR 1929. 

Angier ' . $ 350.00 Dunn 3000 . 00 

Antioch 650.00 Friendship 450.00 

Baptist Chapel 75 . 00 H'ollv Springs 600 . 00 

Baptist Grove 50.00 Kennebec 50 . 00 

Bethel 50 . 00 Lillington 500 . 00 

Broadway 150 . 00 Macedonia ] 00 . 00 

Buie's Creek 1200.00 Xeill's Creek 100.00 

Chalybeate Springs 650.00 Oak Grove 50.00 

Coats 600 . 00 Piney Grove 150 . 00 

Cumberland Union 50 . 00 Rawies 50.00 

Erwin . 400 . 00 Swann's Station 125 . 00 

On motion, the Association adopts, by rising vote, a hearty vote of thanks 
to the Angier Baptist Church and community for the fine hospitality pro- 
vided for this session of the Association. 

Committee on Appointments reports and, on motion, the report is adopted. 

There being no further business, on motion, the Association adjourns until 
the 1929 session. 

Benediction by J. E. Ayscue. 

J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator. 
S. A. RHYNE, Vice-Moderator. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Secretary. 



FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL SBS'SION. 

WRITERS AND SPEAKERS FOB 1929. 

Order of Business — L, L. Johnson and Titus Rogers. 
Baptist Literature — H. Y. Smith and Owen Odum. 
State Missions— B. F. McLeod and S. A. Rhyne. 
Home' Missions — B. P. Gentry and J. E. Ayscue. 
Foreign Missions — Mrs. Abbie Bonsteel and J. A. Hudson. 
Education— J. C. Clifford and L. H. Campbell. 
Aged Ministers — D. H. Senter and R. E. Atkins. 
Hospitals — Miss Mattie Bain and Mrs. J. G. Layton. 
Orphanage — J. F. Blackman and Theo B. Davis. 
Temperance — J. A. McLeod and M. M. Jernigan. 
Woman's Work^ — Miss Mattie Bain and L. L. Johnson. 
Sunday Schools— Mrs. C. D. Bain and B. D. Bunn. 
B.Y.P.U. — Miss Zula Rogers and Howard Gardner. 
Obituaries — Allen Shaw. 



REPORT ON APPOINTMENTS 1929. 

1. That the Association meet at Antioch November 6 and 7, 1929, and Rev 
J. A. Hudson preach the Associational Sermon; 

2. That Rev. L. L. Johnson and Titus Rogers prepare Order of Business; 

3. The first Union Meeting be held at Holly Springs, December 28, 1928, 
pnd Rev. J. E. Ayscue and J. A. Buchanan prepare program; 

4. The Sunday School Convention meet at Buie's Creek, March 30, 1929, 
■P'unday School Board to prepare program; 

5. That the second Union Meeting be held at Cumberland Union, June 29, 
Rev. S. T. Morris and W. F. Lanier to prepare program; 

6. That J. M. Byrd be the representative for State Missions; J. E. Ayscue 
for Home Missions; S. A. Rhyne, Foreign Missions; T. B. Davis, Orphanage; 
E. N. Johnson, Co-operative Program; 

7. Delegate to State Convention — T. Y. Seymour; to Southern Baptist Con. 
vention — J. A. Hudson; 

8. Sunday School Board— L. H. Campbell, B. P. Gentry, Dr. C. D. Bain, 
Mrs. C. D. Bain; 

9. Executive Board— J. C. Clifford, J. A. Campbell, J. M. Byrd, J. W. Byrd, 
C. W. Matthews, C. W. Flowers and H. Y. Smith. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. G. PATTERSON, 

C. W. FLOWERS, 

H. Y. SMITH, Committee. 



FUNDS SENT TO THE ASSOCIATION IN 1928. 



Convention 

ts 



Minute Fund Objec 

Angler $7.50 $ 

Antioch 8.00 

Baptist Chapel 3 . 00 

Baptist Grove 3.25 

Bethel 3 . 00 

Broadway 5 . 00 

Buie's Creek 10 . 00 

Chalybeate Springs 7.50 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION. 9 

Coats 10.00 

Cumberland Union 3.00 10.00 

Dunn 25.00 

Erwin 5-00 

Friendship 10.00 

Holly Springs 8.35 

Kennebec 5.00 11.24 

Lillington 10.00 

Macedonia 5.00 

Oak Grove 6.00 

Piney Grove 10.00 

Rawles 3.20 

Swann's Station 5 . 00 



Totals $152.80 $21.24 



REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

This resembles a report on a home, only it is many times multiplied. 

The last annual report gave 618 children present; of these 117 were at the 
Kennedy Home. With 68 mothers there were aided 282 children, making in 
all 900 children cared for. 

On account of shortage of funds fewer were cared for by mother's aid than 
a year ago. 

Some six or eight hundred were turned away for lack of room, and no more 
could be helped by mother's aid for lack of funds. 

For 43 years this stream of children has been coming in and passing on out 
into life with added preparation for the struggle there. That they be fitted 
and fortified for real living is the matter of chief concern. Our infirmary 
v/ith a trained nurse and skilled physicians, who come at a moments call, 
look after the health; our housekeeping, farm, dairy, printing office and 
other forms of industry, give skill to their hands; a standard school looks 
after their minds; and the religious life of the institution is not neglected. 

There is a painful discrepancy between the number of pressing applica. 
tions for help and the contributions coming in. So far we are not as badly 
in debt as we were a year ago at this time, but contributions are far below 
our expenditures. 

Again every Baptist Sunday S'chool is asked to make a contribution once 
a month. In some schools single classes support a child. Remember the 
Thanksgiving offering measured by one's day's work or income as an ex- 
pression of gratitude and thus enable the Orphanage to do its work. We 
would encourage a club of Charity and Children in every school, 60 cents a 
copy in clubs of ten or more to one address. It is one dollar to a single sub- 
scriber. We ask that a special Orphanage representative be appointed to 
aid the institution in keeping in touch with the Sunday school. 

E. N. GARDNER, Committee. 



REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

Last year the S'tate W. M. U. reported 2,781 societies in North Carolina. 
The total contribution of these societies during 1927 was $278,085.60 

In the Little River Association the W. M. U. organizations numbered 44; 
the contributions totaled $3,161.66. 

It is estimated tbat 629 women and children hold active membership in 
the 22 Missionary Baptist churches in our Association; 502 women and chil- 



10 FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL SEiS'SION. 

dren are enlisted in W. M. U. work. Of this number 45 are tithers. 

In the last yearly report of the W. M. U. of North Carolina, the Little 
River is credited with eight points on the Associational Standard of Excel- 
lence; 14 Societies attained the Standard of Excellence for societies. 

Never before in the history of Southern Baptists have the needs 
of our mission boards been so urgent, and never before have the churches, 
in proportion to the urgency of the claims, been so unresponsive. 

Ts there not reason to fear that because we have so long put the emphasis 
on PAY instead of PRAY, God may be withdrawing from the CHURCHES 
OF THIS GENERATION, in the lessening of our missionary zeal, the gra- 
cious privilege of "co-laborers with Him" on the world-wide extension of His 
kingdom? MRS. JOEL G. LAYTON, 

III; * ' Committee. 



REPORT ON B. Y. P. U. 

Many of our churches are burdened because the members are inefficient 
in the work of the Church. They do not forward the work of the Kingdom 
at home or abroad because they do not know how, the Lord's soldiers but 
unable to handle a gun. Why? Because they have not been trained in the 
B. Y. P. U. 

"B. Y. P. U. is the training agency of the Baptist denomination. Its ob. 
ject is training the young Christians in essential church activities, enlisting 
them in all forms of missionary endeavors, deepening their devotional and 
spiritual life and instructing them in Baptist doctrine and history." 

This work is fostered by the State Baptist Convention and the Sunday 
School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. The State Mission Board 
has four full time workers in this department. Rev. James A. Ivey, who 
succeeds Mr. Perry Morgan as general secretary; Miss Winnie Rickett, Jun- 
ior-Intermediate leader; Miss Marguerite Harrison, Eastern Field Worker, 
and Miss Mary F. Biggers, Western Field Worker. These are kept busy con- 
ducting training schools, institutes, directing enlargement compaigns, hold- 
ing conventions and speaking at Associational and District Rallies. 

Of the 2,336 churches of North Carolina that are co-operating with the 
Southern Baptist Convention about 1,150 of these have one or more B. Y, P. 
U. organizations. 1,186 churches have no B. Y. P. U. — no training camp for 
their members. 

In the Little River Association there are 22 churches. In these churches 
there are four Junior, three Intermediate and eight Senior Unions. Camp- 
bell College has one Intermediate and nine Senior Unions which makes a 
total of 25 Unions in the Association. Under the leadership of Prof. B. D. 
Bunn and Mrs. G. T. Noel our Associational work grew by leaps and bounds 
from the time we were organized in November until the last of May. Since 
that time very little organized work has been done by the Association. Dur. 
ing the year there have been five Unions organized; 15 study classes taught; 
415 awards issued; 17 special programs given; 8 District Rallies held; 175 
letters and 102 postals written. 

We recommend that the pastors and leaders of the Little River Associa- 
tion join hearts and hands with our B. Y. P. U. officers and help meet our 
goal — at least one working B. Y. P. U. in every church of the Association. 

ZULA ROGERS, Committee. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION. 11 

REPORT ON BAPTIST LITERATURE. 

In this report usually our Baptist literature or periodicals are presented 
and the taking and reading them is urged. But it seems to your committee 
the problem now is to induce our people to read, especially our young people. 
They are too much bent on pleasure, riding, sight seeing, etc. 

Now, we are so glad we have the Biblical Recorder, Charity and Children, 
Foreign Mission Journal, Kind Words, and much other good literature and 
our people can have them and read them if they wish to do so. We admit 
that if our people would take and read our organ, the Recorder, to say noth- 
ing of the many other papers and books. Baptist, we would have generally, 
interested, faithful and loyal church members. If such were true in our Bap. 
tist churches, it would not be necessary to have pledge cards, subscription 
lists — corps of collectors who have to hunt them up, and because of the mem- 
ber's attitude, feel embarrassed to mention the matter and when they do — 
the like of excuses is not heard on any other occasion. 

Brethren, it seems to me this matter of interesting our people in reading 
!S the REAL PROBLEM. It is not that our literature is not interesting, it 
i& npt that it is tiresome to the interested reader. But our papers are good 
reading matter, informing and helpful. They are well arranged, having 
different departments — something good and informing for all You probably 
think* that this little report is along the wrong line, that it is off the sub- 
ject, but what is the use of discussing our papers so much unless, indeed, 
that is the way to get people to read. But there is another handicap — the 
members who most need the help and inspiration of these speeches made 
in our Associational meetings and in our helpful meetings are not there. 
And in our church meeting or services those who try to lead and be helpful 
cannot reach the uninterested because they are absent or will not heed. But 
we would not have you think there is not a brighter side — we are so glad 
there are some in all our churches who are trying to hold things together 
and carry on the Master's work. 

We are expecting something good and helpful along this line from the 
speaker on this subject. He will have a poor report to speak to, but hope 
something will be impressed on us that will be greatly helpful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. Y. SMITH, Committee. 



REPORT ON STATE MiSSlONS- 

The State Mission work is the backbone of our denominational work in 
tl e state. The S'tate Mission Board should have the co-operation of all our 
pastors, churches and every Baptist in the State. Without such co-operation^ 
they are hampered and limited in scope. It is a part, and has a large part, 
in our co-operative program. Let us be true to this cause and all other de- 
nominational endeavors. D. H. SENTER, Committee. 



REPORT ON HOSPITALS. 

In every period of the world's history God has given some revelation of 
His will as a test to man. As we trace the progress of the human race we 
are amazed at the power He has given man. The call comes as never before 
to the nations and the people who constitute His Church to "carry on" the 
great program of service that the master gave His disciples nearly two thou- 
sand years ago, viz: Teaching, Preaching, and Healing. As we review the 



12 FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL SEiS'SION. 

ministry of our Great Physician, we are convinced that today as in centuries 
gone by "The words of Life must be spoken by the Eternal Power." 

Our Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem reporis sufferers coming from all 
parts of the State, afflicted with every known disease. Therefore, we rec- 
ommend that each Sunday School in the Little River Association make an 
offering on Mother's Day for this charity work. The Hospital does not ask 
for this Mother's Day offering to support the operating expenses. It raises 
enough money each year to pay all running expenses and put into charity 
around $6,000.00, Dr. Lumpkin writes, "send us your pay patients, bring 
us your charity patients, and with the help of the Great Physician we will 
send them back rejoicing in the blessings of renewed health." 

MATTIE BAIN, Committee. 



REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Before beginning the report on Foreign Missions, may we pause to note 
the death of Dr. James Franklin Love, who for fourteen years faithfully 
served, as financial secretary of our Foreign Mission work. He passed to 
his reward on May 3, 1928. His death was such a great loss to the Mission 
cause; for no one loved this great v/ork more than he. We are indeed be- 
reft over the loss of our beloved brother and mighty leader. 

About five months after Dr. Love's death, his wife, too, passed away. 

Their separation was not long, and there has been a happy reunion 
of these faithful servants of God who worked together so earnestly In the 
interest of foreign missions. 

In spite of many hindrances, the Foreign Mission Board has had a very 
good year's work. There are connected with our work abroj^d 1,275 churches, 
675 of which are self-supporting and 959 of which own their own houses of 
worship. Their grand total cf membership reaches 146,072. They gave last 
year an average of i$3.30 per member. 

That the constituency is much larger than the membership is shown by 
several facts. There are more than twice as many out-stations (2,861) as 
there are churches. In these, multitudes heal* the gospel. There were in 
our 1,538 Sunday schools 75,118 scholars, and in our 587 regular schools 
there were 26,244 students. Our missionary physicians treated 48,464 pa- 
tients. We also had from this great work 12,542 baptisms last year. And 
while these figures give the truth, they do not tell the whole truth; for the 
missionaries are doing thousands of good deeds in the name of our Saviour 
that cannot be stated in terms of numbers. 

Our work in China for more than a year has been greatly handicapped 
on account of civil war. But the situation is how clearing up, and the work 
is about normal again. In Roumania, the Baptists have been granted lull 
religious liberty. This being brought about chiefly through the efforts of 
Dr. E. Y. Mullins, who was until a few months ago president of the Baptist 
World Alliance. Our work in this country — Roumania — has grown under 
persecution; and now since they have religious liberty, much more progress 
will be made. 

And in spite -of the fact that we have made great retrenchments, our work 
on all fields is progressing. God is still with us, and has blessed our efforts, 
but no doubt, would have blessed us and the work much more had it not been 
for these retrenchments. By this word, "Retrenchments" our work has 
been crippled to an astonishing degree and, must be further crippled unless 
Baptists learn to pay like they pray. Hundreds are waiting to go, or rather 
to be sent, to the foreign fields. Thousands are eager for tTie re-opening of 
our schools and millions are beginning for the gospel. And still other mil- 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION. 13 

lions, through our neglect, will die without ever hearing of Jesus and His 
Love. 

Our board has long been depressed by debt, but during the last year su jf-> 
siantial progress has been made towards reducing this great encumbrance. 
But the Board has adopted a plan which will ultimately free it from debt. 
And if we support the plan, it will soon bring about this end. 

What will be the answer? Will the Baptist hosts, in this day of their 
most glorious opporirmity 'slumoer on in undisturbed self-satisfaction while 
the whole fabric of our Missionary Program totters and falls, or will we 
"Awake" and put on our beautiful garmen's of sacrifice and faithfulness and 
rescue our Master's most cherished work from a threatening doom, and send 
Ihe hallelujah notes of triumph reverberating to the darkest reaches of a 
sin-sick, heart hungry world of dying men and women. 

Now, Christ commanded us to go into all the world and preach the Gospel. 
And again he said, "Ye are my friends IF ye do whatsoever I command you." 
John 15:14. And may we prove that we are his friends by coming to the aid 
of this great work, and obeying the command. 

J. A. HUDSON, Committee. 



REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS. 

In the past our people have made plans for a great task among Southern 
Baptists. As a part of this task much effort was put forth in evangelization 
and christian education. Other things in our organized effort were being 
emphasized. The living and characteristcs peculiir to present day civiliza- 
tion have been such as to claim the attention of the brotherhood to the end 
that there has been lacking support from the Christian people identified 
with our Baptist work. As one result much borrowing of funds to 
fulfill contracts previously made became necessary. If our people had ral- 
lied to the call and had provided the necessary funds, perhaps a great ca- 
lamity would have been avoided. The call is clear and strong for the sup- 
port' of our educational institutions fostered by the Home Mission effort; 
for the strengthening of our evangelistic work; for the support of our preach- 
ers in destitute sections; for the building of churches, and all other activi- 
ties directed by our Home Mission Board. This call is acute at this time 
because of recent developments. Perhaps a calamity is sometimes necessary. 
It emphasizes the right. 

It becomes a challenge. We must respond in a big way and see to it that 
the task is successfully accomplished. Baptist Honor day is almost here. 
We commend to this Association, and to the churches the plans of our lead, 
ers for raising the funds so greatly needed at this time for Home Missions. 
The nearly four million Baptist people of the South cm provide the million 
dollars, that must be raised promptly, if all will help. Regardless of the' 
wickedness of man, the work of the Kingdom will go forward. In a fine 
Christian Spirit may every one be found in the right place, at the right time 
on November 11th. If this can be done our Home Mission work is safe. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. P. GENTRY. 

November 7, 1928. 



(§ttt ipah 



ANGIER— 

MRS. MYRTLE WEAVER 

ANTIOCH— 

MRS. PEARL KELLY 

BAPTIST CHAPEL- 
JAMES' K. THOMAS 

BAPTIST GROVE- 
MRS. ETTA F. ARNOLD 

BUIE'S CREEK- 
BEACON Z. T. KIVETT 
MRS. MAGGIE HARMON 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS- 
MRS. MAMIE L. CHAMPION 

CUMBERLAND UNION- 
MISS FLORA WEATHERS 
MRS. CAROLINE WEATHERS 

DUNN— 
DR. R. L. WARREN 
W. A. JACKSON 



MRS. J. B. COLE 

MRS. G. W. SUMMERLINE 

E . LEE 

MRS. ELLA J. DRAUGHON 

MRS'. FESTUS WEST 

ERWIN— 

MRS. W. W. JONES 
HUBERT BYRD 

HOLLY SPRINGS- 
MRS. PEARL ROSSER 
THOS. BENTON McNEILL 

MACEDONIA- 
THOMAS' ASHWORTH 
MRS. IVIARY E. TUTOR 

PINEY GROVE- 
MRS. DAISY INSCORE 
MRS. L. WHTTTINGTON 
MRS. CALLIE MURRAY 
MR. JOHN A. STEPHENS 

RAWLES— 

ELLIOTT SMITH 






LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION. 15 

Woman's Missionary Union 

The Little River Woman's Missionary Union held its twenty-second annual 
meeting with the Antioch Baptist Church, August 30th, 1928. 

THURSDAY MORNING. 

Devotional led by Miss Foy O'Quinn. 

Opened service by singing, "Come, Women, wide proclaim." 

Prayer by Mrs. Joel Layton. 

Roll call of Societies. 

Report of Superintendent. 

Mrs. J. A. Hudson gave an interesting talk on Enlistment Plans of the 
Ruby Anniversary. 

Mrs. Allen Shaw gave a helpful talk on how to reach an A-1 Society. 

Song, "Take My Life and let it be." 

Mrs. Harris made an inspiring talk on Mission Study. 

Song, "There is work to do." 

After the appointment of Committees the meeting adjourned to meet at 
2:00 o'clock. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Devotional led by Miss Marguerite Warren. 
Solo by Miss Annie Bell Noel. 

Report of Young People's Work, by Mrs. Joel Layton. 
■S'ong, "Jesus Lover of my Soul." 

Talk, W. M. U. Training School, by Miss Foy O'Quinn. • 
Vocal Duet: Misses Juanita Martin and Eliza Mosely Hatcher. 
The Nominating Committee made the following report: ^ 

Miss Mattie Bain, Superintendent; 
Mrs. Joel Layton, Young Peoples Leader; 
G. A. and R. A. Director, Mrs. George T. Noel; 
Mrs. J. A. Hudson, Mission Study Chairman 
Mrs. Paul Bradley, Personal Service Chairman; 
Mrs. John D. Holland, Secretary. 
On motion, report was adopted. 

Time and Place Committee report Coats as the next meeting place and the 
last Thursday in August, 1929, as the time. Adopted. 

MISS MATTIE BAIN, Superintende^t. 
MRS'. JOHN D. HOLLAND, Secretary. 



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REGULAR TREASURERS 
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a 
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.7'. R. I'atterson, Lillington 

J. R. Howard, Jonesboro 

Freelon Howell, Fnquay Springs.... 

J A. Matthews, Manchester 

Henry Thomas, Broadway 

.T. F. Blackman, Buie's Creek 

R. B. Johnson, Cahlybeate Springs 

C. G. Fnqnay, Coats 

J. C Hardie, Fnqnay Springs 

H. B. Taylor, Dunn 

R. D. Wnde. Frwin 


F. D. Byrd, Bnnnlevel 

G K. Patterson, Broadway 

Walter E. Bond, Willow Spirngs 

J. E. Womble, Lillington 

J. C. Smith, Holly Springs, R. 2 

L. L Johnson, Lillington 

J. F. McLeod, Coats 

T. L, Howell. Varina 

C. T. Smith, Fnquay Springs 

M S. Godfrey, Jonesboro 




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3 Baptist Chapel., 
4. Baptist Grove. .. 
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7. Buie's Creek 

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10 Cumberland LTn. 

11. Dunn 

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13. Friendship 

14. Holly Springs. . . 

15. Kennebec 

16 Lillington 

17. M'acedonia 

18. Neill's Creek... 

19. Oak Grove 

20. Piney Grove. . . . 

21. Rawles , 

22. Swann's Station' 

Total 





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B.Y.P.U.s OF LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION, OCTOBER 9, 1928. 



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WOMAN'S WORK OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, OCTOBER 2, 1928. 



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237.29 

60.50 

1049.74 

154.13 

85.75 

773.59 

235.14 

245.53 

3.85 

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4.301 



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,|....|....| 180. 00| 
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LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

North Carolina 



54TH ANNUAL SESSION 

HHLiD WITH 

Antioch Bapti^ Church, Mamers, 
NOVEMBER 5 and 6, 1 929 



The next session meets with Erwin Baptist Church, October 29 and 30, 
1930, first session at 9:30 A. M. 
Introductory sermon — 'R, F. Hall. Fuquay iS'prings, N. C. 



cTWINUTES 



OF THE 



Fifty-Fourth Annual Session 



OF THE 



LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



HELD WITH 



o4ntioch Baptist Church, 

Mamers, Nov., 5-6, 1929 



Moderator— J. C. Clifford Dunn^ N. C. 

Vice-Moderator — S. A. Rhyne Erwin,' N. C. 

Clerk-Treasurer — J. A. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 
Nash Brothers, Printerg and Binders 
1929 



ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

J. E. Ayscue Buie's Creek, N. C. 

J D. Betts Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

W. E. Bond Willow Springs, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

W H. Ford Wake Forest, N. C. 

E. N. Gardner Dunn, N. C. 

L. L. Johnson Lillington, N. C. 

B F. Mauldwin Buie's Creek^ N. C. 

S. C. Page • .Route 4, Dunn, N. C. 

S. A. Rhyne Erwin, N. C. 

T Y. Seymour Buie's Creek, N. C. 

NON-RESIDENT PASTORS. 

R. E. Atkins Route 4, Raleigh, N. C 

G. N. Ashley Durham, N. C 

R. F. Hall Fuquay Springs. N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD. 

B D. Bunn, L:ilingtcn; Mrs. C. D. Bcin, Dunn; William Morgan, Angier. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

J. A. Campbell, Buie's Creek; E. N. Gardner, Dunn; J. McD. Parker, 
Erwin; J. F Blackraan Buie's C.eek; Mrs. Paul Bradley; Carl Ousley, 
Lillington, Route 1. 



ASSOCIATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES. 

■S'late Missions, F. D. Byrd; Home Missicns, W. E. Bond; Foreign Mis- 
sions, J. A Campbell; Orphanage, E. N. Gardner; Co-operative Program, 
L. M. Campbell. 



TRUSTEES CAMPBELL COLLEGE. 

Time Expiring 1930 — B. F. McLeod, B'uie's Creek; B Townsend, Murfrees- 
boro; J. E. Lanier Calypso; W. S. Strickland, Dunn;B. P. Gentry, Lillington 

Time Expiring 1931— .J. M. Byrd, Coats; Fred N Day, Winston-Salem; 
E. H. Ballentine, Varina; C. H. Norris, Cary; Alonzo Parrish, Benson. 

Time Expiring 1932— S'antford Martin, Winston-Salem ; H D. Senter. Chaly- 
beate Springs; Miss Mattie Bain, Coats; W. K. Rand, Durham; Mrs. I. M. 
Wallace, Buie's Creek. 

Time Expiring 1933— J. C. Clifford. Dunn; G. F Pope, Dunn; D. B. Teague, 
Sanford; W^illiam Morgnn, Angier; R. G. Taylor, Dunn. 



PROCEEDINGS. 

Mamers, N. C, 

Tuesday, November 5 1929. 

The Little River Association met in its fifty-fourth session with Antioch 
Baptist Church as above stated, 9:30 A. M. 

C. W. Flowers, Angier, conducted the devotional exercises. 

Moderator J. C. Clifford of last year called the Association to order. The 
roll of churches is called and there being a quorum present, the body pro- 
ceeded to the election of officers with the following result: 

Moderator, J. C. Clifford, re-elected; Vice-Moderator, S. A, Rhyne, re- 
elected; Clerk-Treasurer, J. A. Campbell re-elected for the fiftieth year. 

Committee on Program reported as follows and, on motion the report is 
adopted, allowing such changes in order of business as the body may deem 
best: 

PROGRAM 

TUESDAY, NOV. 5th. 
9:30 A.M.— Devotional— G. W. Flowers 
10:00 A.M. — Organization. 

10:30 A.M— ^Sunday Schools — Mrs. C. D. Bain, B. D. Bunn. 
10:50 A.M. — Baptist Literature— H. Y Smith, Owen Odum. 
11:15 A.M. — Sermon — Rev. W. H. Ford, Angier, N C. 

DINNER. 
1:15 P.M.— Devotional— W. M. Morgan. 
1:30 P.M.— State Missions— B. F. McLeod, S. A. Rhyne. 
2:00 P.M. — Home Missions — B. P. Gentry, J. E. Ayscue. 
2:30 P.M. — Foreign Missions — Mrs. Abbie Bonsteel, E. N. Gardner. 

Adjournment, 
7:15 P.M. — Devotional — George Graham. 
7:30 P.M.— B. Y. P. U — Miss Zula Rogers, Howard Gardner. 

Pageant — "The Three Visitors" — Holly Springs B. Y. P. U. 
Address — Rev. E. N. Gardner. 

WEDNESDAY NOV. 6th 
9 : 30 'A.M.— Devotional— H. Y. Smith. 

10:00 A.M. — Orphanage — J F. Blackman Theo. B. Davis. 
10:30 A.M.— Education— J. C. CliiTorcl, L. H. Campbell 
10:45 A.M.— Hospitals— Miss Mattie Bain, Mrs J. G. Layton. 
11:00 A.M. — Temperance — J. A. McLeod, M. M. Jernigan 
11:20 A.M.— Woman's Work— Miss Mattie Bain, L L. Johnson. 
11:40 A.M.— Aged Ministers— D. H. Senter, R. E. Atkins 
12:20 P.M.— Obituaries— A M. Shaw. 
12:35 P.M. — Reports of Committees. 
Adjournment. 

L. L. JOHNSON, 

TITUS ROGERS, Committee. 



4 FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Delegates and visitors enrolled as follows: 

Angler — W. H. Ford, William Morgan, Mrs. William Morgan, Mr. W. H. 
Stephenson, C. W. Flowers, Mrs C. W. Flowers. Ada Overby, Howard Gardner. 

Antioch— D. A. Oollins, J. C. Bullock, D. A. Patterson, W. H. Rogers, 
Letha MoLean, W^ W. McLean, George Collins, Hugh Mills, Nancy Porter, 
Lenora Collins, Lonnie McLean. 

Baptist Chapel — A. L. Smith, Mrs. J. T. Thomas. 

Baptist Grove — Lizzie Jones. Mrs. R. W. Wester, R. W. Wester, D. G. Sex- 
ton, J. R. Thomas, Mrs. H. M. Thomas. 

Bethel — J. A. West B. F. Matthews. 

Bro£.dway— W\ M. Thomas, H. S. Cox, Mrs. Attie Kelly Cox, Mrs. E, C. 
Thoiiias, Mrs W^ M. Thomas, Virginia Thomas. 

Buie's Creek — Rex Johnson, Mrs. Rex Johnson, J. A. Campbell, Mrs. J. A. 
Campbell, J. L Long, J. B. Gregory, E. G. Murray. Mrs. E. G. Murray, Carl 
Ousley, Mrs. A. B. Bonsteel T. Y. Seymour. 

Chalybeate Springs— Theo B. Davis, G. D. Campbell, Mrs. J. W. Holloway, 
J. W. Holloway, E. W. Smith, R. E. Smith, Mrs. R. E Smith, Mrs. E. W. 
Smith, George R. Wells, C. K. Smith, Rubie Smith, Mrs Ada Bradley, Mrs. 
Geo. R. Wells, J. F. Smith 

■Coats — Alton Grimes A. D. Williams, Owen Odum, Mrs Owen Odum, 
Mattie Bain 

Cumberland Union — J. S. Brown, Mrs. J. S. Brown 

Dunn— J. C. Clifford, E N. Gardner, G. T. Noel, Mrs. G. T. Noel, Mrs. C. 
L. Guy, Ruth Burns, M M. Jernigan. Mrs. C. D. Bain, Mrs. E N. Gardner, 
Mrs. J. T Guy, Mrs. S. Y. W^eaver, Mrs Jesse B. Lee, E. C. Keller. 

Erwin — J. H. Durroch, J. H. McKee A. H. Perry, J. B Sessoms, S. A. 
Rhyne, Gilbert Woodworth 

Friendship— A. F. Jones, Mrs John T. Byrd, Mr. Alton Jones J. McD. Par- 
ker, Mrs C. M. Allen. 

Holly Springs— H. Y. Smith, Mrs. H. Y. Smith, L. E. Byrd, W. J. Wilson, 
M C. Thomas, Mrs. L. E. Byrd, J. D. Patterson. Mrs. J. D. Patterson, Mrs. 
H. E. Buchanan, Mrs. W. J. Wilson, Myrtle Thomas^ Mrs. W. C. Thomas, D 
J. Patterson, Irela Smith, Jas A. Buchanan, R. T. Smith. 
• Kennebec— Walter E. Biond, Alice E. Smith, Avis P. Smith, M.»T. Olive, 
Mrs. R. H. Smith 

Lillington— Mrs. J. B. Tugwell, Mrs. John E. White. Mrs J. G. Layton, 
Mrs. Clarence McNeill, L. L. Johnson, B D. Bunn, B. P. Gentry Mrs. S. A. 
Powell, Mrs. J. R. Baggett. 

Macedonia— Rosa Brown, J. E. Holt, Mrs. J. E. Holt, Lena Weathers, 
Irela Brown. 

Neill's Creek — Walter Johnson. 

Oak Grove — 

Piny Grove— R E. Austin, Mrs. R. E. Austin, Mrs. A. S. Austin, Mrs. O. D. 
Lyon, Mrs. H. O Austin, Mary Honeycutt, Mrs. J. A. Johnson, Mrs. E. L. 
Parker^ M. D. Honeycutt, E L. Parker, R. E. Atkins, Mrs. R. E. Atkins, 
Leamon Powell, Edna Powell. 

Rawles — 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 5 

Swann's 'S'tation — Letter. 

Visitors— B. G. Early, Raleigh Association; S. W. Oldham, Raleigh Asso- 
ciation; W. M. Page, Salem, Va ; N. C. Brooks, Wake Forest; Jesse McCar. 
ter, Wendell; A. A. Pippin, Wakefield; W, M. Gilmore. Mission Board; M. L. 
Kesler, Orphanage; Mrs W. R. Bullock, Raleigh Association; Mrs. L. B. 
Glazier, Raleigh Association; Mrs. John Davis, Fayetteville. 

Mrs. C. D. Bain reads the report on Sunday Schools and, on motion, the 
report is adopted. Discussion of report to follow. 

The report on Baptist Literature is read by H. Y Smith and^ after dis- 
cussion by Owen Odum, Theo. B. Davis, and W. M. Gilmore, by motion the 
report is adopted. Jesse McCarter represented the Biblical Recorder. 

The following new pastors were introduced: Carl Ousley, Cumberland 
Union; E. N Gardner, Dunn; W. A, Ford, Angier. 

The congregation sang. "My hope is built on nothing less," and the annual 
sermon was preached by W. H. Ford, using for a subject, "The Changeless 
■Christ," Jesus Christ the same yesterday, to-day and forever — Hebrews 
13:8. Prayer by C. D. Brooks. The benediction was pronounced by Dr. M. 
L. Kesler, following the motion for adjournment for dinner. 

AFTERNOON 

The worship was conducted by William Morgan. Sang, "Jesus paid it all." 

On motion, the Association invited Shiperintendent M. L. Kesler to present 
the claims of the Mills Home which he did. On motion, E. Norfleet Gardner 
is elected Orphanage representative for the ensuing year. 

The Moderator calls for the report on State, Home and Foreign Missions, 
ihe only report ready was the report on Foreign Missions, which was read 
by Mrs Abbie Bonsteel. On motion to adop*^ W. M. Gilmore, represent !n&; 
the General Board, discussed the Co-operativ^e Program, followed by Tha'? 
B. Davis, and the report was adopted. 

The Moderator appoints L. L. Johnson, William Morgan and H. V. SmlTh 
the Committee on all appointments. 

The Association unanimously adopted a resolution changing the tinio of 
meeting next year to Wednesday and Thursday before the first Sunday in 
November, authorizing the Executive Board to make such change in the time 
of meeting as they may find necessary to suit the needs of our State gather- 
ings 

On motion to adjourn, the benediction was pronounced by E. N. Gardner. 

EVENING SESSION, 

The devotional services are conducted by — . — . Powell, 

The B. Y. P. U. report is read by Miss Zula Rogers. On motion to adopt, 
the report is discussed by Howard Gardner. 

Pastor Gardner, of Dunn, delivered an address on Greatness. 

On motion, the Bi. Y. P. U. meeting to be held at Campbell College on the 
fourth Sunday afternoon in November elect officers for the B. Y. P. U. of 
the Association. 



6 FIFTY -FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 

There were pesent at this meeting from the Western district 38 delegates, 
from the Eastern district 13. Meeting adjourns with benediction by M. L. 
Kesler. 



WEDNESDAY^ NOVEMBER 6. 

The devotional services are led by H. Y. Smith who reads part of the 
6th chapter of John, and prayer by B. G. Early. 

The report of the Orphanage is read and, on motion, is adopted, the subject 
having been discussed at yesterday's session. 

The report on Education is read and, after discussion by J. A. Campbell 
and B. G Early, on motion, the report is adopted. 

Report on Hospitals is read, discussed by Mrs. J. G. Layton and H. Y. 
Smith and adopted. 

On motion, Mrs. J. G. Layton is elected representative for Hospital for 
ensuing year. 

Report on Temperance is read, discussed by B. G. Early and adopted. 

The report on Woman's Work is read, and, after being spoken to by L. 
L Johnson, the report is adopted. 

D. H. Senter is requested to write the report on Aged Ministers and for- 
ward the same to the Clerk. 

L. L. Johnson reads the report on appointments and, on motion the report 
Is adopted. 

J. A. Campbell makes a motion that the thanks of this Association be ten- 
dered to the Antioch Church and community for the bounteous hospitality 
manifested in entertaining this session of the Association, The motion was 
enthusiastically and unanimously carried. 

The Association then adjourned, with prayer by J. A. Campbell. 

S. A. RHYNE, Vice-Moderator. 

J. A CAMPBELL, Clerk. 



GOALS FOR 1930 

Angier $ 850.00 Dunn 3000 . 00 

Antioch 500.00 Friendship 300.00 

Baptist Chapel 50.00 Holly Springs 500 . 00 

Baptist Grove 50 . 00 Kennebec 35 . 00 

Bethel 40. 00 Lillington 200 . 00 

Broadway 150 . 00 Macedonia 50 . 00 

Buie's Creek 1200 . 00 N^eill'^ Creek 50 . 00 

Chalybeate Springs 600.00 Oak Grove 40 . 00 

Coats 400.00 Piney Grove 150.00 

Cumberland Union 50 . 00 Rawles 50 . 00 

Erwin 300.00 'S'wann's Station 100.00 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



WRITERS AND SPEAKERS FOR 1930. 



Order of Business — S. A. Rhyne, J. F. Blackmail. 
' Baptist Literature^ — H. Steele. J. A. McLeod. 
State Missions — C. W, Flowers, R. F. Hall. 
Home Missions — W. E. Bond, J. E. Ayscue. 
Foreign Missions — Mrs. Abbie Bonsteel, W. H. Ford. 
Education — Dr. C. D. Bain, L. L. Johnson. 
Aged Ministers— J. C. Clifford, T. Y. Seymour. 
Hospitals — J. A. Buchanan R. E. Atkins. 
Orphanage — Mrs. C. D. Bain, E. N. Gardner. 
Law Enforcement — J. F. Blackman, B. F. McLeod. 
Woman's Work — Mrs. Pauline Bradley Miss Mattie Bain. 
Sunday S'chools— B. D. Bunn, Mrs. C. D. Bain. 
B. Y. P. U.— Miss Zula Rogers, Carl Ousley. 
Obituaries — H. Y. Smith. 



The first named is to write the report and the second one is to open the 
discussion. 



(^;|V^ 



Obituaries. 



ANGIER— 

B. E. BARBER 

ANTIOCH— 
B. A. BOYD 
ALEX O'QUINN 
MRS. CHLOE BYRD 

BAPTIST CHAPEL— 
J. G. DALRYMPLE 

BAPTIST GROVE- 
MRS. ILA MAE LEE 
MRS. MARY BAKER 
MRS: ETTA ARNOLD 
MRS BESSIE HOWELL 
MRS. LOLA ELKINS 
MRS. L. L CAIN 

BETHEL- 
JOHN HOLDER 

BROADWAY— 

J. H. THOMAS 

BUIE'S CREEK— 

W. M. BRYAN 
CM. COLLIER 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS- 
MRS. ELLA SMITH 



COATS- 
MRS. MARGARET BAIN 
DEACON A, M. BEASLEY 

DUNN- 
MRS". J. W. DRAUGHON 
J. E, CREECH 
W. R. HOLLAND 
J. E. COLE 
W. J. JONES 
MISS HELEN BUTLER 

HOLLY SPRINGS- 
MRS. C B. McNEILL 

LILLINGTON— 

MRS. MARY SALMON 

MACEDONIA- 
MRS. ETILLIE BAKER 

PINEY GROVE- 
MRS. ANNIE MURRAY 
MRS. SALLIE ROLLINS 
MRS. BETTIE HORTON 
MRS. MARIE JONES 
MRS. CORA TAYLOR 
WILLIAM L SMITH 

SWANN'S STATION— 
D. P. GRAHAM 






LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 9 

Woman's Missionary Union 

The Little River Woman's Missionary Union held its twenty-third annual 
meeting with the Coats Baptist Church August 28-'29. 

THURSDAY MORNING. 

The meeting was opened with the singing of "The Vv^oman's Song", after 
which Mrs T. D. Stewart led the devotional. Prayer by Mr. Steymour. 

Special Music — Miss Elsie Pope — "I am Satisfied with Jesus." 

Roll call of societies — delegates from Antioch. Buie's Creek, Chalybeate 
Springs, Coats, Dunn, Lillington, Piney Grove, and Holly Springs responded. 

The Superintendent made her report (see report), recognized Antioch Y. 
W. A. the only A-1 society, and appointed the following committees: 

Time and Place — Mrs. Paul Bradley Mrs. T. Y. Seymour, Mrs. H. C. 
McNeil. 

Nominating — Mrs. J. B. Tugwell, Mrs. G. W. O'Quinn, Miss Cora Smith. 

Mrs. Theo. B. Davis spoke on "Enlistment", using Psalm 95:1 as the basis 
of her remarks on the W. M. U. choir. Duet — Mrs. M. M, Jernigan and Miss 
Pope. 

Mrs. Edna R. Harris gave us "The Three Looks at our Work." 

After recognizing Pastors Davis and Seymour, the session adjourned with 
prayer by Rev. T. B. Davis, to meet at 2:00 o'clock. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Hymn — "More Like the Master," followed by devotional led by Miss Linda 
O'Quinn. 
Special music — Coats Junior G. A 's. • 
Baptist Literature was discussed by Mrs. T. Y. Seymour. 
Winning North Carolina through our Young People — Mrs. E. N. Gardner. 
Memorial was explained by Mrs. Edna R. Harris. 
Conference on Personal iS'ervice led by Mrs. Allen Shaw. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

made the following report: 

Superintendent — Mrs. Paul Bradley. 
Secretary — Mrs. V. L. Stephens. 
Chairman Mission Study — Mrs. Joel Layton. 
Leader of Young People — Miss Zula Rogers. 



10 



FIFTY-FOURTH' ANNUAL SESSION 



G. A. and R. A. Director — Mrs. George Noel. 

Chairman Personal Service — Mrs. Allen Shaw. 

On motion, the report was adopted. 

Time and Place Committee reports Holly 'S'prings Church and the last 
Thursday in August, 1929, as the time. Adopted. 

A few remarks by Mrs. Edna Harris and a rising vote registered in appre- 
ciation of Miss Mattie Bain's work as Superintendent. 

Also a vote of thanks tendered Miss Pope for the splendid musical pro- 
gram and to the ladies of the church for entertainment. 

SUPT. MRS. PAUL, BRADLEY. 
SEC. MRS. V. L. STEPHENS. 



WOMAN'S WORK OF THE LITTLE RIBER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, 1929 



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89.83 

244.07 

22.25 

1012.53 

298.07 

183.94 

1416.45 

69.50 

84.33 

18.80 

205.61 

111.51 

180 J)o 

3935.69 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 11 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS ETC. 

1. That next session of the Little River Association meet with the Erwln 
Church: 

a. Time — October 29th-30th as per resolution adopted, 

b. Preacher — Rev, R. P. Hall, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

2. Committee on Order of Business for next session — S. A. Rhyne, J F. 
Blackmon. 

3. Union Meetings: 

a. Saturday, December 28th, Holly Springs Church. Program Committee — 
J. E. Ayscue J. A Buchanan. 

b. Saturday, June 28th, 1930, Neill's Creek. Program Committee — L. L. 
Johnson, Lloyd Johnson 

4. Sunday School Convention — 

iS'unday March 30th, Lillington Ohurch. Program Committee — B. D. Bunn, 
Will Morgan. Mrs. C. D. Bain 

5. Representatives for objects of Convention — 

F. D. Byrd— State Missions; W .E. Bond — Home Missions; J. A. Campbell, 
Foreign Missions; E. N. Gardner — Orphanage; L. H. Campbell — Co-operative 
Program 

6. Delegates to Conventions — 
S. A. Rhyne — State Convention. 

J. A. Campbell — Southern Baptist Convention. 

7. Sunday iStehool Bioard— B. D. Bunn, Will Morgan, Mrs. C. D. Bain. 

8. Executive Board— J A. Campbell, E. N. Gardner, McD. Parker, J. F. 
Blackmon Mrs. Paul Bradley, Carl Ousley. 

Respectfully submitted, 
L. L. JOHNSON, 
H. Y. SMITH, 
WILL MORGAN, Committee. 

REPORT ON B Y. P. U. 

The B. Y. P. U. is recognized as one of the most potent forces in the world 
today for the development of christian youth. The challenging need is that 
each church supply for its young people in the B. Y P. U. the most talented, 
consecrated and highly trained leadership available. The General B. Y. P. 
[J. Organization is the best instrument known for finding and developing 
that leadership. 

The work of the B Y. P. U. is promoted through the monthly B. Y. P. U. 
magazine. Special B. Y. P. U. Literature, Field Work, General B. Y. P. U. 
Organization, Associational B Y. P. U., and Correspondence. The State has 
four full-time workers in this department. 

We recommend that our pastors and leaders co-operate with our B. Y. P. U. 
officers so that they may lead our young people to "study to show them- 
selves approved unto God as workmen that needeth not to be ashamed, right- 
ly dividing the word of truth." ZULA ROGERS. 



12 FIFTY -FOURTH' ANNUAL SESSION 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 

The modern Sunday School is a real school — a gathering for instruction. 
It has all the elements of a school, with some elements which make it dis- 
tinct in character, unique in purpose, in method and in curriculum. It is in 
the church, of the church for the church. 

Dr. William E, Hatcher in his book, "The Pastor and the Sunday School," 
says "The Sunday School is the most flexible, far-reaching institution ever 
yet devised for the conversion of the world. . . It is not an easy task to 
estimate the value of the (Sunday School. It is a school with a single text 
book and that the word of God It has calmly chosen the entire human 
family as its constituency and is enrolling its students by the millions." 

"What royal friends and supporters it has — ministers, scholars, eminent 
teachers from colleges and universities, men in every noble profession, men 
of affairs, men of wealth and power in the large walks of trade and finance 
and millions of women chosen of God in living fellowship with Jesus Christ, 
whose perpetual joy is the study of the word of God." 

The open Bible and the uplift of the Cross must hold with increasing em- 
phasis the center of Sunday School life and support. 

Your committee would urge anew the supreme importance of the Sunday 
School and ask that the people in all our churches interest themselves more 
and more in its work. The program of the modern Sunday School as out- 
lined by our S'unday School Board is adaptable and applicable to every type 
of church in our Association. Mr. J. N. Barnette, Nashville, Tenn , is charged 
with the special responsibility of developing the Sunday School work in rural 
churches. The program of the Sunday School Board can be used to 

1. Reach the people. 

2. Teach them the Scriptures. 

3. Win them to Christ. 

4. Enlist and utilize them in service. 

5. Train in stewardship and doctrine. 

6. Finance the Church program 

7. Hold people and keep them true and loyal to the church. 

All needed information concerning the work of the Sunday S'chool can be 
secured from the various departments of the Baptist Sunday School Board, 
Nashville, Tenn. Dr. D. J. VanNess, Secretary, or from our State Sunday 
'School Department, Raleigh, Mr. Perry Morgan, Secretary. 

Realizing the need and importance of the Sunday School work we offer 
the following practical suggestions: 

1. That every church in the Little River Association adopt a policy of 
continuous training. There is a well-defined course of study for every 
officer in the Sunday 'School. This can be done by local workers 

2. That the organization and equipment be made adequate for efficient 
work. Rev. J M. Page, building evangelist, Raleigh, N .C. will render val- 
uable free service to any Baptist Church desiring to build or remodel to 
meet the needs of the Sunday School. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 13 

3. That we avail ourselves of the excellent literature put out by the 
Sunday School Bioard, especially the needed literature for Beginners and 
Primaries and the Sunday School Builder for the superintendent. 

4. Tliat a systematic and continuous effort be made to reach, teach and 
win the unenlisted in our constituency. 

5. That every church send a representative, for information and inspira- 
tion, to our annual State Sunday School Conference held at Meredith Col- 
lege, Raleigh, in June, 

6. That we look forward to the day and hasten the time when, in co- 
operation with our general and State iSunday School Boards we may secure 
a full time Sunday School and B. Y. P. U. worker to foster the work in our 
Association which the Sunday School committee has failed to do, inas- 
much as the magnitude of the work demands more time and effort than the 
committee could give to it. MRS. C, D. BAIN. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST LITERATURE. 

There seems not much new to say on this subject; still there is great 
need that something should be said that would awaken our people. Our 
Sunday Schools are generally using our Convention or Sunday School Board 
literature but this report is supposed to deal with our denommitional lit- 
erature. 

If our people would take and read the Biblical Recorder, many of the 
problems and difficulties would be solved, especially for the pastor. How 
to bring this about is the problem. I wish that I could suggest something 
that would accomplish more than has been done But continue to urge, 
encourage in every way available, "Line upon line, precept upou precept, 
here. a little and there a little." 

We are so glad many of our Sunday Schools are taking clubs ot Charity 
and Children; so many more are reading this paper. These are hopefuj 
r^igns. Let all be more faithful in endeavor to help along this important 
phase of our work. Information and interest is the great need. 

Respectfully, 

H. Y. SMITH, Committee. 



REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

God has never set bounds for His message of salvation. The field is the 
world. H'e has instituted no agency but man, a saved soul, redeemed by the 
blood of the Lamb, to carry other men this life -giving message. "Go ye" in 
Matt. 28:19 does not mean that all must go to foreign fields in peison, but 
it does mean that each redeemed soul must go in prayer and gifts if not in 
person. 

Millions of souls are dying without Christ because our congregations he.^r 
so little of the work and needs of the fields beyond. Lists of sermons of the 
Atlanta and Macon (Ga.) churches for three weeks do not indicare a mis. 
sionary theme. This is a typical situation of the South, Returned mission- 



14 FIFTY -FOURTH' ANNUAL SESSION 

aries stir us for the time being; but before the next one comes along to 
renew our interest, the Lord's money has been invested in other ways. 

At present Southern Baptists have work in 15 fields: China, Japan Africa, 
Italy, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina. Chili, Jugo-tSlavia, Roumania, Hungary, 
Russia and Palestine. For lack of funds, the fewest number of missionaries 
are at their posts. Five years ago, Cheng-Chow, China, had 14 missionaries; 
today 2; the hospital and school are closed. In Keifeng 23 missionaries, 
today 11. Hwangsien 25 today 13. 

In four years, 1926-1929, 11 missionaries have been lost by death; 109 
have resigned, leaving 444 many of whom are now at home eagerly awaiting 
the word to return to their posts. Four years ago there were 182 young 
people, volunteers for foreign work. 60 of these have passed the age limit; 
others have sought appointment by other boards; and many have lost hope 
cf going. 

The budget for this year is $522.00 less than for last year. We hope the 
total budget, $1,500,000.00, for debt on the board and all the expenses on the 
fields, may be met. In order to provide luxuries for our Baptists here in the 
South, the Foreign Board had to refuse urgent requests from missionaries 
for $226,000.00. 

Though we report large gains in membership, our gifts for 1928 were 
$4"40,863.00 less than for 1927. Our gifts for 1929 are less by $30,000.00 than 
for 1928 for the six months of the Convention year. In a list of 25 leading 
denominations, these names were chosen as the highest and the lowest gifts 
per capita: 

Moravian^ North $72.53 

Presbyterian, South $35.58 

Baptists, North $23.76 

Methodist E. South $16 70 

Baptists, South $10.62 
. Out of $40^038,256 00 for all purposes from Southern Baptists, only $7,402,- 
788.00 went for all missionary purposes — missions, education, benevolences. 
Southern Baptists are giving more to denominational work than ever before, 
but the division of gifts is out of proportion. Virginia in 1921 gave $1,- 
927,000.00 for home purposes and $1,198,000 00 to missions; in 1928 $2,780 - 
000.00 for home and $650,000.00 to missions. This is only typical of other 
states. 

In China the situation is growing brighter. The government is establish- 
ed; idols are being destroyed; temples are being used for schools; anti-for- 
eign and anti-Christian sentiments are dying out; Christian testimony is 
bearing fruit. 

In 'S'outh America the Catholic Church has failed Shall we win the intel- 
ligent class for Christ, or shall we let them drift into atheism or indiffer- 
ence? There is a mass movement toward Christianity in Nigeria. Last 
year we baptized 4525 souls into the fellowship of the Baptist faith in 
Koumania. All the world is awake and agog. Only we hesitate. The whole 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 15 

world calls for Christ. All men everywhere stand alert, expectant, longing. 
Christ says, "Go ye, Give, Pray ye." 

MRS ABBIE BONSTEEL, Committee. 



REPORT ON HOSPITALS. 

As we trace the progress of the human race we stand amazed at the power 
God has given man in fulfilling the promise that He should have dominion 
over land and sea. 

The call comes as never before to the nations and people who constitute 
His Church to "carry on" the great program of service that the Master gave 
His disciples nearly two thousand years ago, that of Teaching, Preaching, 
and Healing. 

For six years our North Carolina Baptist Hospital has offered a helping 
band to the unfortunate sick of the state. During the past year 2,375 pa- 
tients have received treatment, 14 out of every thousand died, the others 
went home benefitted or cured. 

These sufferers came from every part of the State, afflicted with every 
known disease. More than 500 were charity patients. If we meet the in- 
creasing demand of this charity work, we must enlist the loyalty of our 
Sunday iS'chools both large and small on Mother's Day The charity work 
is entirely separate and apart from the bonded indebtedness, and for min- 
istering to the sick we can use no part of the four per cent fund. All char- 
ity work is a part of our operating account and must be cared for by Moth- 
er's Day offerings, annual donations from the Duke Foundation and any re- 
serve funds or earnings the operating account may have. If we would enter 
into that larger service for our needy brothers and sisters next year, we 
would again emphasize the necessity of all our churches co-operating in our 
Mother's Day offering. As we on this day recall the love and tender memo- 
ries of one who first loved us. 



REPORT ON V/OMAN'S WORK. 

So fast have the days flown that it hardly seems possible for another 
year's work to have begun and ended. 

The Lord Christ in human hearts not only creates the wish but verifies 
the fact that there is a "Land of Beginning Again." It is here, it is NOW,. 
This year is a new opportunity, a time of beginning again to do probably 
the same thing that we did last year, but with a little more wisdom a little 
more patience with ourselves and with others, a little more faith and confi- 
dence in God and in ourselves by His help. 

It is gratifying to note that more attention is being paid to the Standard 
of Excellence each year. This speaks well for our mission work as no so- 
ciety can be A-1 without answering yes to the ten points on the standard. 

In reading the account of the first missionary society of which we have 
any record we find that they made gifts to prove their intentions were real. 



16 FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL. SESSION 

So as a test of how real are our missionary intentions the women of our 
Slate reported last year $278,085.60, this amount being $3,085.60 over our ap- 
portionment. 

Do all you can to help Mrs. Bradley in her work as Associational Super- 
intendent. We trust that the stronger societies will more and more foster 
the weaker ones, thereby growing themselves as they keep others growing. 



REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

One drop of water is sometimes the beginning of a great stream which 
becomes a mighty power in service. In 1885 an organization was begun 
which has, no doubt, gone, in service, beyond the dreams of its founders. 
Our Orphanage is one of the greatest organizations we have today. Think 
for just a minute of what it means to give a helpless child food and shelter. 
Think of what it means to take a child out of corrupt environment and place 
it in a home where training is certain and where the atmosphere is whole- 
some, sweetened and purified with Christianity. 

Personal touch with some few of the students who were trained at Thomas- 
ville from early days of childhood, gives to me an absolute assurance that 
the work which is being done there is of a value beyond human measure. 
Personal experience with one of our Mothers' Aid cases makes me realize 
something of the value of our Orphanage in this branch^ of its work. It 
means meal in the gum, shoes to wear_^ and nine months of school inste?id 
of six. If it were possible for our people to know what our Orphanage is 
doing, it would be easier to get contributions for its support. 

Had you stopped to think for just a minute how often a new comer appears 
at our Mills Home? On Nov. 11, 1885, the first child was welcomed into the 
home at Tliomasville and almost by th& time the matron could place the 
homeless babe in its quarters under her care another one was accepted and 
welcomed into the fold. Thus the process began and it went en, and it went 
on and on, and for forty-four long years, your and my Orphanage, has been 
receiving helpless children at a rate of one child every four and one-half 
days the year round 

How can I render service to the Mills Plome? First — by talking to more 
people about the good our Orphanage is doing (not what it is failing to do); 
!?'econd — by encouraging the people to subscribe for and read the Charity 
and Children; third — by encouraging the once per month contributions from 
the Sunday School; fourth — by adding to my own contribution. 

At a recent date we had 635 children in our care, besides the three hun- 
dred in homes under the care of the Mother's Aid. The cost of operation is 
tremendous. Can you do more and cause others to assist in a greater way? 

J. F. BLACKMAN, Committee. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 17 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 

Our Christian Schools and Colleges are passing a crisis which must chal- 
lenge the concern of every thoughtful person This is especially true just 
now of our North Carolina Baptist Schools. 

The Christian churches have led in the matter of education since the 
American civilization began. Practically all of the great old Institutions of 
the country are either Christian now or were begun as Christian or Church 
Schools. This is true of Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Brown George Washing- 
ton and many other of the great institutions of our country. It is true of 
practically all of the older institution of learning of North Carolina, with 
the exception of the ^S'tate University alone. 

Our Christian fathers longed, worked, and prayed for the time when edu- 
cation in our commonwealth would be universal. It is more nearly so now 
tnan it has ever been before in the history of our State. There are by far 
more students in school from the Elementary grades to the highest colleges 
and universities than ever before; and our schools, colleges and universities 
are doing a higher grade of work than was ever done before. This does and 
should rejoice the heart of every patriotic North Carolinian, and yet this 
very growth in sentiment favorable to universal education, although it had 
its origin and its day spring in the hearts and labors of our Christian fath- 
ers as well as Christians of the present generation, has brought about a sit- 
uation which is threatening the very life of the Christian Institutions of our 
State, some of wnich have already perished. 

Our public school laws and the large appropriations made by our Legis- 
lature for public education, including education in its higher branches has 
created a situation in which the Christian Institutions are now struggling 
for their lives We rejoice that our public' schools are now giving to our 
high school boys and girls who are ambitious a better high school education 
without cost than the generations immediately preceding were able to get 
at the old fashioned academy and high school at great expense. These state 
free schools covering the fields, so far as curriculum is concerned, covered 
by our old fashioned Christian Academies and high schools have put the 
Christian High School or secondary school almost if not completely out of 
business. 

The sentiment created in the state high schools does not lead, as formally, 
high school students to select a Christian College for the completion of his 
education. The inter-school debates, the inter-school athletic contests and 
many other features of our modern school activities rather incline the stu- 
dent completing his high school course to enter a state school rather than 
a denominational school. Perhaps our higher denominational schools have 
none but themselves to blame for a part of this situation, as many of these 
activities it would seem might be carried on by our Christian Institutions 
of higher learning. 

The most threatening aspect of this situation it seems to us is this: The 
Association of Schools and Colleges is rapidly raising the grade or standard 
of schools and colleges. Some of this gradation is more or less arbitrary 



18 FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION 

and mechanical, not referring necessarily to the grade of work or scholar- 
ship done or imparted by the institutions. For instance, a standard school 
must have a certain minimum of students; a certain sum as an endowment 
fund or an income from other sources equivalent to such endowment; a cer- 
tain number and grade of books in its library; a faculty consisting of a 
definite percentage of instructors with a degree of M.A , of a higher scholas- 
tic degree, equipment of a definite minimum in value. And a school or col- 
lege which cannot qualify as "A" grade in those lines will soon fall into 
disfavor and ultimately lose its life. 

It is easy for a college which is richly endowed to qualify in these stand- 
ards of gradation. It is comparatively easy for the State Institutions which 
have comparatively large appropriations made from the public treasury to 
keep apace with the increasing demand for larger libraries, increased income 
and better equipment, but it is exceedingly hard with our present attitude 
toward our institutions, for Baptist Schools and Colleges to keep up with 
this increasing demand. 

We do not criticise this. We believe our schools and colleges ought to 
grow and standards ought to be elevated; each year ought to add to their 
necessary and useful equipment, and yet. we must, if we think at all^ see 
that Baptist Schools are going to be reduced to the secondary class unless 
Baptists of this iState rally to their schools as they have not done for many 
years in the immediate past. We have seven Baptist Institutions in the State 
that are doing a fine work at present, including Campbell College, located 
within the borders of this Association for which we are especially thankful. 
Their usefulness, however, will be practically at an end if we should allow 
them to lag in the procession of schools and c'olleges and be reduced to an 
inferior grade on account of the lack of endowment, equipment or income. 

It is our opinion that our Churches throughout this Association and the 
State should be aroused to the imoortance of keeping our Educational Insti- 
tutions constantly before our people; to teach them the advantages of send- 
ing their boys and girls, especially those that are not in training for some 
special vocation, trade or profession not offered by these schools; the supe- 
rior advantages offered by a numerically small institut^'on over that of an 
institution numbering its students by the thousands where the individual 
is lost in the mass, this being especially true of the first year or two of the 
young college student's career Above all let us not forget the advantage 
which a young man or young woman has by being surrounded in the forma- 
tive atmosphere which we are persuaded surrounds' ea^h of our Christian 
Schools. J. c. CLIFFORD. Chairman. 



LITTLE RIVEIR ASSOCIATION 19 

REPORT ON TEMPERANCE. 

Temperance is a broad subject and covers the entire scope of life. Science, 
common sense, law and religion admonish us to be temperate in all things. 
However, alcoholic liquors have ruined so many lives and have had injurious 
effects upon human society to such a degree that a discussion of temperance 
naturally centers around the question of prohibition. 

In the first stages of the fight for temperance the work was aimed to create 
public' sentiment against the liquor traffic, and securing the passage of laws 
to prohibit the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors. Such sentiment 
was created in different localities and numbers of local units of government 
passed laws either by popular vote or through governing bodies prohibiting 
the manufacture and sale of liquor Later a great number of the States be- 
came dry States either by legislative enactment or by popular vote. Then, 
as the work pro.gressed and sentiment grew, the Eighteenth Amendment to 
the Constitution of the United States brought national prohibition. 

We now have the necessary laws against the manufacture and sale of in- 
toxicating liquors, but the fight is not over. Temperance, to be sure, occu- 
pies a more advantageous position than ever before, but the battle is not 
ended. Tremendous forces are at work to bring liquor back, but we have 
these forces on the defensive and we must not allow a change of positions 
with the enemy. Our task now is to continue the campaign of education, 
teaching the injurious effects of strong drink upon the individual and upon 
society, creating greater public sentiment against the liquor traffic, inspiring 
law observance and aiding our officials in the enforcement of the laws. The 
opposition encourages disobedience of the law in order to discredit it. 
They say the law is too drastic, that it takes away one's personal liberty. 
Any law is drastic to him who wants to do what the law prohibits. As to 
personal liberty, there is no such thing at this stage of our civilization. A 
sole inhabitant of a lone island might have personal liberty, but he who lives 
among other people is estopped to claim what he may call personal liberty. 
One's liberty ends where the other fellow's rights begin and everybody's 
lights are so entertwined to the rights of everybody else that the thing called 
personal librrty ^-ps - '- 1 -r ir ^- .iryne '-• 'r, civil 111 erty and our 

Constitution guarantees to all the blessings of such liberty. A law which 
promotes the general welfare, though it may inconvenience those who con- 
sider only the satisfying of a depraved appetite, is a good law. Gladstone 
said that the purpose of law is to make it easy for people to do right and 
difficult for them to do wrong. Our temperance laws make it easy for one 
to' abstain from the uses of strong drink and difficult for one to acquire the 
habit of drinking. Therefore, these laws must be good and righteous laws. 

Science, good sense, the laws, and God are all on the side of temperance 
and if we who believe in temperance and are enlisted in the cause do not, 
with the support of these allies finally win a complete victory over the liquor 
forces, we shall prove ourselves to be a cowardly company of soldiers. Let 
us renew the battle and march cautiously, but surely on to greater victories, 
and finally to complete victory in the righteous cause of temperance. 

J. A. McLEOD. 






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TABLE YI— B. Y. P. U. OP THE LITTLE RIYER ASSOCIATION. 



CHURCHES 






1. Angler |. 

2. Antioeh | Y^es 

3. Baptist Chapel | 

4. Baptist Gi-ove | 

5. Bethel 

6. Broadway | . . . . 

7. Buie's Creek | Y"es 

8. Chalybeate Springs .| Yes 

9. Coats I 

10. C'nmberland Union. . | No 

11. Dunn |YesI 1 1 

12. Erwin j Yes] 1 1 

18. Friendship I No j j 

14. Holly Springs I Yesj j 1 

15. Kennebec I .... j .... 1 

16. Lillington j | ] 

17. Macedonia lYesj....] 1 

IR. Neill's Creek ] No | j 

]0. Oak Grove [No I j 

20. Piney Grove lY^es]....] 1 

21. Rawies I No j 1 

22. Swann's Station j No j 1 



Total 



"I.... I 151 



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55. 



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35| . . . . 



,1....]. 



13 .35 1 65] 40 

10 I 42 I 70] 14 



. I .... I 301 . 



121 a5| 14 



38|....| 431 . 



55 



136 



10 



2|....| 328] 108] 124| 541] 284] 253 



\r^fU 



cTWINUTES 

OF THE 

LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

55th ANNUAL SESSION 

HELD WITH 

ERWIN BAPTIST CHURCH 

ERWIN, N, a, 
OCTOBER 29th and 30th, 1930 



J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator Dunn, N. C. 

W. M. MORGtAN, Vice-Mioderator Angler, N. C. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, 'Cllerk-Treasurer Buie'is Creek. N. 0. 



The next session meets with Friendship Baptist Church, Bunn's Level, 
N. C, November 4 and 5. 1931, first session 9:30 A. M. 

To preach Associational sermon, J. A. Camphell or his alternate 
E. N. Gardner. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brother©, Book and Job Printers 

1&30 



c^TWINUTES 

OF THE 

LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

55th ANNUAL SESSION 

HELD WITH- 

ERW^IN BAPTIST CHURCH 

ERWIN, N, C, 
OCTOBER 29th and 30th, 1930 



J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator Dunn, N. C. 

W. M. MORGAN, Vice-Moderator Angier, N. C. 

J. A. CAMPBELiL, Clerk-Treasurer Buie'iS Creek. N. C. 



The next session meets with Friendship Baptist Church, Bunn's Level, 
N. C, Novemher 4 and 5. 1931, first session 9:30 A. M. 

To preach Associational sermon, J. A. Campbell or his alternate 
E. N. Gardner. 



Goldsboro, N. C. 

Nash Brothers, Book and Job Printers 

1930 



ORDAINED MINISTERS. 

J. E. Ayscue Buie's Creek, N. C. 

J. D. Betts Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

W. E. Bond Willow Springs, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell Buie's Creek, N. C. 

C E. Edwards Buie's Creek, N. C. 

W. H. Ford Wake Forest, N. C. 

E. N. Gardner Dunn, N. C. 

L. L. Johnson Lilllngton, N. C. 

B^. F. Mauldwin Cary, N. C. 

S. C. Fags Route 4, Dunn, N. C. 

S. A. Rhyne Erwin, N. C. 

NON-RESIDENT PASTORS. 

C. N. Ashley Duke University, Durham, N. C. 

R. E. Atkins Raleigh, R. 4, N. C. 

R. F. Hall Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

LICENSED MINISTER AND PASTOR. 
Carl Ousley Lillington, Route 1, N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD. 

B P. Gentry, L. H. Campbell, Mrs. C. D. Bain. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

J. A. Campbell, E. N. Gardner, J. McD Parker, J. F. Blackman. Mrs. Paul 
Bradley, Carl Ousley. 



KEPRESENTATIVES FOR ASSOCIATIONAL OBJECTS. 

State Missions — Mrs. C. L. Bain; Home Missions — J. E. Ayscue; Foreign 
Missions — ^R. F. Hall; Orphanage — W. E. Bond; Christian Education — B. D. 
Bunn; Sunday Schools — 'B P. Gentry; Aged Ministers — C. E. Edwards; 3. 
i . P. U. — ^Oarl Ousley, Mary Austin; Baptist Literature — Mrs. ATDbie Bon- 
steel; Hospitals — F. D. Byrd; Law Enforcement — M. M. Jernigan; Obit- 
uari'es — J. M. Byrd. 



TRUSTEES CAMPBELL COLLEGE. 

Time Expiring 1931 — J M. Byrd, Coats; Fred N. Day, Winston-Salem; 
E. H Ballentine, Varina; C. H. Norris, Wake Forest; Alonzo Parrish. Benson. 

Time Expiring 1932 — Santford Martin, Winston-Salem; D. H Senter, 
Chalybeate Springs; Miss Mattie Bain, Coats; W. K. Rand, Durham; Mrs. 
I. M. Wallace, Buie's Creek 

Time Expiring 1933— J. C. Clifford, Dunn; G. F. Pope, Dunn; D B. Teague, 
Sanford; William Morgan, Angier; R. G. Taylor, Dunn 

Time Expiring 1934 — B F. McLeod, Buie's Creek; B. Townsend, Winston- 
Salem; J. E. Lanier, Wallace; W. S. Strickland, Dunn; B. P. Gentry, Lil- 
iington. 



PROCEEDINGS. 



Erwin, N. C, 

October 29, 1930, 9:30 A. M. 

The Little River Association met in its fifty-fifth annual session, time and 
place above stated. 

Song, "Oome Thou Almighty King." 

J. M. Byrd conducts the devotional exercises, commenting at length upon 
"where your treasures are there will your heart be also." 

Former Moderator J. C. Clifford calls the meeting to order and Clerk J. 
A. Campbell records the proceedings. 

Delegates from the churches and visiting brethren enrolled. 

J, M. Byrd moves that the rules be suspended and J. C. Clifford be elected, 
by acclamation, Moderator for the ensuing year. Adopted unanimously. 

W. M. Morgain, in the same manner, is elected Vice-Moderator and J. A. 
Campbell, Clerk and Treasurer. 

Delegates and visitors enrolled as follows: 

Angier — ^C. W. Flowers, Mrs. C. W. Flowers, W. H. Ford, William Morgan, 
Mrs. William Morgan, Nedgelnena Morgan, Mrs. W. H. Stephenson, Mrs. 
Pearl Parker — 8. 

Antioch — R. A. Puryear, Oscar Rogers, Frafnk Patterson, Zula Rogers. — 4. 

Bethel— J. A. West, W G. Elmore, G. A. Matthews.— 3. 

Buie's Creek — J. E. Ayscue, J. A Campbell, Mrs. J. A. Campbell, C. B. 
Edwards, J. N. (Gregory, Mrs. J N. Gregory, J. W. Denning, Carl Ousley — 8. 

Chalybeate Springs— R. F. Hall, S L. Veazey, J. W. Holloway, Mrs. J.W. 
Holloway, Juanita Veazey, Elsie Holloway, G. R. Wells, Mrs. G R. Wells— 8. 

Coats— J. M. Byrd, Mrs W. E. Nichols. Mrs. T. D. Stewart, Miss Mattie 
Bain, Mrs. Carlos Stewart — 5. 

Cumberland Union — J. O. Weathers, J. W. Brown — 2. 

Dunn— iE. N. Gardner, Mrs. E N. Gardner, C. D. Bain, Miss Elizabeth 
Townsend, Mrs. R. A. Duncan, Mrs. C. L. Guy, J. C. Clifford, Mrs. J. A. 
McLeod, Mrs. J. F. Martin, Mrs J. F. Byrne, J. F. Byrne, Mrs. L. F. Baiiley. 
Mrs. R. W. Pope, Mrs. G. T. Noel, 'G T. Noel, L. F. Bailey, Mrs. Vara 
Thornton, Miss Frances Draughon, R. M. Warren, Mrs. R M. Warren, Mrs. 
Iierbeirt Taylor, Mrs. C. T. Conner, Miss Katherine Jones Taylor, Mrs. C. 
R. Vinson — 24. 

Erwin— iMrs, M. B. Womack, Mrs J. T. Bishop, Mrs. S. A. Rhyne, Mrs. 
C. C. Hall, A. H. Perry, J. B. Sessoms, Mrs. A. W. Byrd, Mrs. E. J. Byrd,8 
Friendship— J . McD. Parker, E. L. Jones, F D. Byrd, C. L.. Avery — 4. 

Holly Springs— W. J. Wilson-^l. 

Kennebec— W. E. Bond, M T. Olive, Miss Avis Smith, Miss Ellie Olive, 
Miss Alice Smith — 5. 

Lillington— B. D Bunn, L. L. Johnson. Mrs. C. E. Sorrell, Mrs. J. B. 
Tugwell, Mrs. J. D. Johnson — 5. 

Macedonia—Mrs. J. B Holt, J. E. Holt, Roy Weathers, J. C. Austin— 4. 

Neill's Creek— Walter Johnson, D. D. Johnson— 2. 



6 Fifty-fifth Axtv^ual Session 

Piny Grove — R. E. Atkins, Mrs R. L. Atkins, Mrs. R. E. Atkins — 3. 

Swann's Station — ^J. G. Spivey, D. A. Graham, C. R. Graham, L. G. 
Holt— 4. 

Visitors — Mrs. Geo. W Ferrell, R. D. Covington, W. R. Beach^ Mrs. W. 
R. Beach, C. A. Upchurch. E. B. ©ooker, M. A. Huggins — 7. 

The following churches sent letters but no delegates: 

Baptist Chapel, Baptist Grove, Broadway, Rawles. 

Oak Grove was not represented by Letter nor by delegates in 1929 nor in 
J 930. 

Visitors welcomed and R D. Covington, Treasurer of Mills Home, W. R. 
Beach, representing the Biblical Recorder respond. R. F. Hall, new pastor 
at Chalybeate Springs Cjnd Fuquay Springs, and C. E. Edwards new minis- 
ters to our Association are recognized and welcomed 

Committee on Order of Business reports and the report is adopted as 
follows: 

PROGRAM. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29TH', 1930. 

9:30 A.M.— Devotional— J M. ©yrd. 
10:00 A.M. — Organization. 

10:30 A.M.— Sunday School— B. D. Bunn, Mrs. C. D. Bain. 
10:50 A.M.— Orphanage— Mrs. C. D Bain, E. N. Gardner. 
11:15 A.M.— Sermon— R F. Hall. 

Dinner 
1:15 P.M — Devotional — M. M. Jernigan. 
1:30 P.M.— State Missions— C. W Flowers, R. F. Hall. 
2:00 P.M — ^Home Missions — ^W. E. Bond, J. E. Ayscue. 
2:30 P.M. — ^Foreigs Missions — ^Mrs. Abbie Bionsteel, W. H. Ford 

Adjournment. 
7:30 P.M. — Devotional — A. E. Lynch. 
7:45 PM.— B.Y.P.U.— E. N. Gardner. 

Selections from Cam,pbell College quartet. 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30th. 

10 : 00 A M. — Baptist Literature — Henderson Steele, J. A. McLeod. 

10:30 A.M.-^Education — Dr. C. D. Biain, L L. Johnson. 

ID): 45 A M.^Hospital — J. A. Buchanon, R. E. Atkins. 

11:00 A.M. — Law Enforcement — J. F. Blackmon, B. F. McLeod. 

ri:20 AM. — Women's Work — Mrs. Pauline Bradley. Miss Mattie Bain. 

11:40 A,M, — Aged Ministers — J. C. Clifford, T. Y. Seymour. 



Little Eiver Association. 7 

ID: 20 PM.— Reports of Committees. 
12:30 P.M. — ^Announcements, Fellowship Week. 
12:40 P.M.— Obituaries— H. Y. Smith. 
Adjournment. 

J. F. BLAOKMON. 

S. A. RHYNE, 

B D. Bunn reads the report on Sunday Schools and after discussion the 
report is adopted. 

The subject of the Mills Home is presented by R. D. Covington and later 
the report is presented by E. N. Gardner. Report adopted. 

R. F, Hall preaches the Associational sermon, using for a text H Cor. 8:5, 
"But first they gave their own selves." 

Prayer by J, A. Campbell. 

In the absence of S. A. Rhyne, pastor of the Erwin Church, W. R. Beach 
acted as supply pe^stor giving welcome to delegates and visitors. He made 
announcements about the Biblical Recorder and took a number of subscrip- 
tions for the paper. 

On motion, the Association adjourns one hour for dinner. 

Benediction by L. L. Johnson. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Moderator Clifford in the chair. Congregation sang, "Come thou fount of 
every blessing," and E. N. Gardner leads in prayer. 

C. W. Flowers reads the report on State Missions, W. E. Bond the report 
on Home Missions and Mrs. Abbie Bonsteel the report on Foreign Missions. 

On motion to adopt these reports, General Secretary of the Convention 
Charles E. Maddry addressed the Association on the Co-operative Pro- 
gramme. 

The Moderator appoints L L. Johnson, Williaim Morgan and W. E. Bond 
the Committee on Appointments. 

On motion, the Association adjourns with benediction by C. E. Edwards. 



NIGHT SERVICES. 

Devotional exercises conducted by A. E. Lynch. B.Y.P U . report read by- 
Miss Zula Rogers, and on motion to adopt, the report is discussed by Carl 
Ousley and reports from the members from Erwin, Antioch, Buie's Creek, 
Kennebec, Angier and Piney Grove 

Special music rendered by Campbell College quartet. "Joseph's Dream 
Came True", was dramatizd by the young men of the Dunn B.Y.P.U. 

Song, "Blest be the tie that binds " 

Adjourned. 



8 Fifty-fifth Annual Session 

SECOND DAY MORNING SESSION. 

Thursday, October 30, 

Moderator Clifford presided. 

Song, "How Sweet to Trust in Jesus " 

J. MicD. Parker conducted the devotional exercises, reading the Scriptures, 
with comments, aoid led in prayer. 

Minutes of yesterday read and approved. 

r^ew delegates enrolled and visitors invited D. W. Herring returned mis- 
sionary from China, and C. A. Upchurch, representing the Anti-Sal*ooii 
League and M. A. Huggins, Meredith College, reported. 

E N. Gardner reads the report on the Orphanage, urging monthly offering 
from the Sunday Schools, with Thanksgiving offerings. 

Report on Education is read by Dr. C. D. Bain. The subject is discussed 
by L L. Johnson, M. A. H'uggins, and J. A. Campbell and the reiport is 
adopted. 

The report is read on Hospitals and. after discussion by R. E. Atkins, on 
motion, the report is adopted 

Law* Enforcement is discussed by B. F. McLeod, C. A. Upchurch and J. E. 
Ayscue. 

E. B Booker, visitor from the South River Association, is recognized. 

On motion to adjourn for lunch, prayer is offered by D. W. Herring. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

While delegates and visitors were enjoying the delightful lunch and fel- 
lowship of the Erwin Church, a heairty and unanimous vote of thanks was 
extended the Erwin people for their bounteous hospitality. On re-assem- 
bling prayer is offered by E. N. Gardner. 

Report on Woman's Work is read and after discussion by Miss Mattie 
Bain, and E. N. Gardner, the report is adopted 

J. C. Clifford reads the report on Aged Ministers. The subject is discussed 
by T Y. Seymour and the report is adopted. 

The Modera>tor appoints Committee called for in report to make report 
next year as follows: E. N. Gardner, J. M. Byrd, L. L Johnson. 

The Committee on Appointments makes its report, which was adopted 

There being no further business, on motion, the Association adjourns. 

Prayer by J. E. Ayscue. 

J. C. CLIFFORD, 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Moderator. 

Clerk. 



©bituanes 


ANGIER— 


DUNN— 


AT^iRrX HOCKADAY 


J. H RUSSELL 


WORTH STEPHENSON 


MRS. ANNIE FELTON 


ANTIOCH— 


ERWIN— 


JAMES O'QUINN 


E. J. PITTMAN 


MRS. MARY O'QUINN 




MRS. JULIA MCLEAN 


HOLLY SPRINGS- 


MRS. LILLA WOMACK 


MRS. MARTHA MCNEILL 


BAPTIST GROVE- 


MACEDONIA- 


MRS. FRANCES KNIGHT 


MRS EUNICE TRUELOVE 


MRS. MARY LOCKAMY 




MRS. ALICE! JOHNSON 


NEILL'S CREEK- 


MRS FATIE BROWN 


MRS. NELTA JOHNSON 


J. M. JOHNSON 






PINEY GROVE_ 


BUIES CREEK- 


A. E. AUSTIN 


MRS. JAMES GREGORY 


MRS. CHINA RAWLES 


MRS J. F. GREGORY 


MRS. GLADYS WEAVER 


MRS. WILLIAM HATCHER 


MRS SAMANTHA DRIVER 


MRS. C. R. STEWART 


MRS. S. B. ADOOCK 




ROWAN HOWELL 


CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— 


J. E. MATTHEWS 


S. F MATTHEWS 


S L. WEATHERS 


MRS. MARTHA BETTS 




CUMBERLAND UNION- 




MRS. NANCY LANIER 


. 


MRS. DEWEY JOHNSON 

















10 Fifty-fifth Annual Session 

REPORT ON APPOINTMENTS. 

1. Next Session — Friendship Church. 

a. Time — Nov. 4th and 5th, 1931. (Executive Committeie is authorized 
to change date if advisable). 

b. Preajcher — J. A. Campbell, or his alternate — E. N. G^ardner. 

2. Committee on Orde^r of Business for next session — L. L. Johnson, F. D. 

Byrd. J. A. Campbell. 

3. Union Meetings — Fifth Sundays — Two hour afternoon sassions: 

a. Sunday, Nov. 30th, 1930, with Dunn Chapel — Program Committee: 
E. N. Gardner, M. M. Jernigan. 

b. Sunday, March 29th, 1931'with Cumberland Union Church. Program 
Committee: Carl Ousley, J. A. Campbell. 

c. Sunday, May 31st, 1931 — with Kennebec Church. Program Commit- 
tee: W. T. Bond, Will Morgan. 

d. Sunday School Convention — August 30th, 1931 — with Buie's Creek 
Church. Program Committee: B. P. Gentry, L. H. Campbell. Mrs. 
C. D. Bain. 

4. Representatives for Objects of Convention: 

State Missions — Mrs. C. D. Bain. 
Home Missions — J. E. Ayscue. 
Foreign Missions — R. F. Hall. 
Orphanage — ^W. E. Bond. 
Christian Education — ^B. D. Bunn. 

Sunday Schools — B. P. Gentry. 

Aged Ministers — ^C. E. Edwards. 

B. Y. P. U. — Carl Ousley, Mary Austin. 

Baptist Literature — Mrs. Abbie Bonsteel. 

Hospitals— hF. D. Byrd. 

Law Enforcement — M. M. Jernigan. 

Obituaries^ — J. M. Byrd. 

5. Delegates to Conventions — 

a. State Convention — ^W. H. Ford. 

b. Southern Baptist — J. A. Campbell. 

6. Sunday School Board — B. P. Gentry. L. H. Campbell, Mrs. CD. Bain. 

7. Executive Board — 

J. A. Campbell, E. N. Gardner, McD. Parker, J. P. Blackmon, Mrs. 
Paul Bradley, Carl Ousley. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. L. JOHNSON, 
W. E. BOND, 
WILL MORGA?;. 

Committee. 



Little Rivek Associatiox. 11 

REPORT ON AGED MINISTERS. 

Eitbej" right or wrong this is the day of young Ministers. Our churches, 
as a rule, call young ministers as their pastors. Few churches desire to 
call a pastor tha/t is over fifty years of age, and. yet, a Minister ought to be 
approaching his prime at the age of fifty. 

This may be due in some measure to the fault of the minister himself. 
There is a temptation with all of us to slow up as we approach old age. 
There is a tendency of the professional man to cease his studies as he ap- 
proaches old age He forgets that it is impossible to obtain a fresh draft 
from a stagnant pool. Let all of us who are approaching old age keep 
young in heart and mind by aissociating with young people, keeping abreast 
ot the times and by constant study increased by the accumulated experience 
of the past, make ourselves useful, enlightening and interesting to the pres- 
ent day. If this is done the man of experience will be sought in preference 
to the on? without this experience. When we cease to grow, we begin to 
die. 

We have ministers and 'other leaders, who. at the age of fifty, sixty, sev- 
enty and even eighty, are really young in mind and heart, and if their 
leadership is in the realm of the spiritual or the mental, their services are 
sought by individuals and communities in preference to men of less expe- 
rience. 

There comes a, time, however, when the old Minister, either on account 
of the infirmities of age or diseasa, must hand ever his mantle and place it 
upon younger shoulders. When I his time fome:& he ought to be supported 
in no niggardly manner by those whom he has served faithfully in the past. 
Our denomination as a whole has not regarded these old soldiers of the 
Cross with tha tenderness which they deserve. As a r^^le they hive accumu- 
lated nothing in the past; they have led their communities and congrega- 
tions in liberality and they face old age with a dark outlook. The amount 
sat aside for aged Ministers in our Co-operritive Progra-m amounts to a very 
small stipend for these old and disabled soldiers and their wdows 

There is an organized insurance, by which a minister pays a per centage 
of his salary and this provides s<n annuity for him and his family when he 
becomes disabled, either by age, accident or o"herv/ise. In its practical 
wcrldngs this annual payment is usually paid three-fourths ly the Cliurch 
served by the pastor and one-fourth, by the pastor himself. This ought to 
be ]'ut in practice by all of the churches of cur Association. Doubtless a 
number of churches would desire to pay this entire prem.ium for their pas- 
tor while he serves them, in the wpy cf an addition to his salary, thus pro- 
viding an adequate support when he becomes disabled by age or infirmities 
and securing an annuity to his widow when he is cut down by death, either 
in young manhood or old age. 

We- recommend that a rommit^ee be appointed to report this feature of 
the provision or a better plan for caring for aged min^'sters at the next ses- 
sion of the Association and if practicable, recommend to the Association 
how this insurance feature aggdnst the infirmities of old age and death m,ay 
be secured by our ministers and the churches which they serve. 

J. C. CLIFPORD. 



12 Fifty-fifth A]vnual Session 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

Le us consider for a moment, Missions in the thought of God. There is 
an underlying cause for everything and for every condition of things. Mis- 
sions are either of men or of God. Is it possible that ji.st men alone would 
launch an enterprise that demands so much sacrifice as Christian missions? 
And is it possible that men would maintain missions at such tremendous 
cost unless they were moved by the prompting of the divin:? I say that 
they would not and could not. <God is love, and whoever engages in such 
-a sacrifice as missions must have that quality of God. After making a survey 
of the ccst and sacrifice, the trials and terrible ordeals that somei must endure 
and have already endured, and the success .md glorious results of missions 
already attained, no person of a reasonable mind can doubt that 'God is the 
-author of missions. The reascn that we ha,ve an earth en which to Live is 
because God thought it. The reason we have flowers and fruits, and every- 
thing gO'Cd lor food and pleasant to the sight is because God thought them. 
The reason that we have mankind peopling the earth is because God thought 
men; and such wonderful thinking it was, men in the likenEiss and image 
of God. The reason that there is a Christ is because 'God thought a Saviour. 
And the reason that there is church is because God thought it. And the 
reason that we have Christian mieisicns is becaus? God thought them., Mis- 
sions are God's scheme cf perpetual activity of his people in blessing all 
mankind. 

Home missions constitute the power house of redeeming influence. Just 
a few mini: tf IS i efore Christ ascended into heaven He said to his disciples, 
'And ye shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem and in all Judea, 
and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth." Let us note that 
He said that they should first be witnesses in Jerusalem. Judea. and Sa- 
maria, and last, unto the uttermost parts of the earth. An army may carry 
on a successful campaign abroad, but, the success of that army will depiend 
upon the strength of all resources back home. If foreign missionjs succeed, 
we must first have strong missionary churches at home. The question that 
now arises is are our Baptist churches the strong missionary churches that 
tTiey should be. Are we thoroughly missionary fo the core, or is our mis- 
sionary spirit a thin superficial veneer? Again Christ, the Saviour of men, 
likened the kingdom of heaven to a grain of mustard planteidi in the ground 
wliich afterward became a mighty tree. Again the kingdom of heaven was 
like unto the leaven hid in three measures of meal until all was leavened. 
Everywhere the thought seems to be that we miust keep the home fires burn- 
ing. And if we keep them burning at all it will be better to keep them burn- 
ing brightly May all of our churches burn with the white heat of mission- 
ary endeavor. A gun must be loaded before there can be a discharge. The 
Christian men and women who compose Baptist churches must be loa,ded 
with the grace of God and His giving spirit before they can efficiently func- 
tion as missionary churches. Since missions have forever been in the 
thought of the Eternal God let us do all that lieis in our power to find the 
place that He has designed for us and in every way to co-operate with Him 
In carrying out his full program. 



Little River Association. 13 

Can wie enlist our people in missionary service and giving? Yes, many 
ot them — but not all of them. Some are so indifferent that they cannot be 
enlisted Some are not enlisted for lack of information. And some refuse 
to be enlisted when they are informed. And some want to give and have 
not the means. Figuring on the basis of the statistics given in the minutes 
of the Little River Baptist Association I find that our people gave to mis- 
sions on 'an average of about ten cents per month per person for the year 
1929. Several churches reported nothing. Others reported very small 
amounts. None of us have done as well as we oould In the Southern Bapw 
tist Oonventionl there are 24,010 churches. Of these 2837 or 11.82% gave to 
the co-operative program only $5,083 or 21.17% gave to designated 'objects 
only. 8367 or 34.85% gave both ways. 331 unclassiified . The total number 
of churches supporting the Co-operative Program for the year 1929 is 11,204 
or 46.66%. Total churches giving to missions, etc., 16,618 or 69.21%. Total 
churches giving nothing or not reporting 7,392 or 30.79%. Thus, brethren, 
yc'u see that nearly one-third of the churches of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention are giving nothing to missions. Probably 50% of the members of 
the churches that do give are giving nothing to missions. If that be true, 
then there are 55% of the Baptists of the South not giving anything for 
missions, and 45% are bearing the whole burden. The statistics which I 
Tiave given you appeared in the October issue of the Home and Foreign 
Fields Now, brethren, if these statistics are correct it ought to be a mat- 
ter of great concern to us. There is so much that we have done that we 
may point to with pride. But, there is so much that we have not done to 
make us ashamed. 

Today therei is a new center of the world. For two thousand years the 
hub of the world was ajround the shores of the Mediterranean Sea with a 
decided advantage to the Roman Catholic church The hub of the world 
lias been moved. The hub of the world now includes the Panama Canal, 
the iGulf o£ Meixioo, and the Oarribean sea. This is the great ocean highway 
of the world. Our government is in full control of the Panama Canal. The 
Baptists are meeting with phenomenal success in the ORJoman Catholic coun- 
tries of South America and the central American States The wealth, in- 
dustry, and education of the nation is gravitating toward the South. The 
Southern States are the stronghold of the Baptists. Wfcat a challenge this 
age holds for the Baptists! Now is the time of Bajptist opportunity. The 
world is ooming oiur way and fast beginning to understand our position. 
Money, industry, the population of this country, and peoples and nations 
and kindreds and tongues are being thrust upon us. Ood imea(ns for us to 
give and work. It is God's challenge to our Home Mission forces. In this 
the Home Miiission forces have an opportunity to do a world-wide work and 
to help take the world for Christ. WAITER E. BOND, 

Committee. . . 

REPORT ON ORPHANAGE. 

The support of the work of the Orphanage is one of the most welcome 
tasks of North Oarolina Baptists. Ever since John H. Mills received the first 



14- Fifty-fifth Annual Session 

child at Thomasville nearly forty-six years ago until this good day the care 
of the fatherless and motherless hais rested upon the hearts of the Sunday 
Schools of our State. Once a month they send their offerings; and are join- 
ed at the Thanksgiving season by other organizations of the church in the 
effort to forward the amiount of one day's wages to the institution caring for 
our orphain children. Last year the people of our State gave $147,0:22.27 for 
this work. 

The latest report indicates fc05 children at the Mills Home, fittingly named 
for the founder of the institution, 135 at the Kennedy Home, and 260 in 
homes with their mothers. In all, the Orphanage is thus casting a protect- 
ing arm around 900 boys and girls of our state, including the mothers of 
those aided by the "Mother's Aid" plan. 

Several of the churches of the Little River Association makei monthly con- 
tributions for this work. We regret to note however, that nine axe report- 
ed ^s having given nothing during the first nine months of 1930. In justice 
to those it may be said that we believe all of these may be counted on in their 
gifts at the Thanksgiving season. A month hence let us see to it that the 
Little River miakes the finest contribution it has ever made to support this 
work, which at present is in need of our gifts. Respectfully submitted, 

E, NORFLEET GARDNER, 

Orphanage Representa' ive. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION. 

Although a report on 'Christian Education would seem to ajpply more di- 
rectly to our Christian schools, I wiant to pause long enough to call to mind 
that the beginning 'of Christian education is in the home. In Deuteronomy 
6:6 — 9, we read, "And these words, which I command thee this day, shall 
be in thine heart; and thou shaLt teach them diligently unto thy children, 
and thou shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou 
v/alkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou riseth up, 
and thou shalt write them upon the posts of thy house,, and on thy gates." 
The Christian home is the foundation of Church and society. 

No longer does the necessity for education in the life of our modern world 
have to be argued. Knowledge is power, always and everywhere. The Unit- 
ed States Commissioner of Education tells us that a common school eduoa- 
tion increases a man's productive ability 50 per cent, a; high school training 
increases it 100 per cent, and a college training increases it from 200 to 300 
per cent. 

Not only for the individual, but for the safety of our democracy is the 
education of all the people a necessity. Liberty and leairning must go hand 
in hand. "Whatever you would put into the state, you must first put into 
the school" was the sage advice of a German philosopher a generation ago 
and the whole world suffered because the wrong idea was put into the school 
system of Germany. 

In this day when the state is providing better school facilities than ever 
before, from elementary grades to the University, why Christian education? 



Little River Association. 15 

First of all. It is the only complete education. Man is a three-fold being; 
body, mind and soul. The highest type of education is three-fold — physical, 
mental and spiritual. Boys and girls grow physically anywhere. They grow 
mentally in a good school and in cultural environment. This is as far as 
the state can go. It cannot enter the realm of vital religion and the su- 
premely essential element of human Life is the spiritual element. The 
knowledge of Egypt, the culture of Greece, the learning of Rome could not 
save theiP boasted civilization. The president of a state university has said, 
"Thatj it is possible for a boy to graduate from one of the best of our state 
institutions and be as ignorant of the Bible, the mioral and spiritual truths 
whicb it represents, and the fundamental principles of religion, as if he had 
been educated in a non-christiain country." Who is to supply this great need 
if not the Christian school and college? 

In the second place, Christian education is fundamental Bible doctrine. 
We have already mentioneid its sanction in the Old Testament and it was 
supremely sanctioned By the example and command of our Lord. It is ab- 
solutely necessiary in carrying out Christ's Great Commission. 

In the third place, our ieadership in America, in all realms, comes mainly 
from our Christian schools. By far the majority of chief justices, presidents, 
masters of American letters and statesmen, who have attained prominence, 
have been graduates of Christian schiools and colleges. Numbers of our 
small Christian colleges in our country have furnished many times the num- 
ler of leaders furnished ly State institutions. Today the most command- 
ing call in the political and religious life of America is for the right kind 
of leadership. 

Not only in the realm of statesmanship but In the professions are the pro- 
ducts of Christie n education or schools outstanding. Many receive their call 
tool high, -God ordained service in the spiritual atmosphere of our Christian 
school, each; fulfillsi the aim of its mission but the motive of the Christian 
ers whose daily lives as well as their teaching, bear witness to the Chris- 
tian faith. Students go out from this atmosphere to provide a leaven in 
teacher supply. There is no conflict between State school and Christian 
school each fulfills the aim of its mission but the miotive of the Christian 
school is that of the "second mile." However, the Christian school must 
have equipment, class "rooms, laboratories, libraries' and faculty just as the 
State school and these things cost money. But that indefinable something 
which pervades campus and cla|ss room, which we call "Spirit," the spirit 
of Christ, can no man estimate. 

Under the control of the Southern Baptist Convention there are the fol- 
lowing schools for the ti'aining of leaders: The Southern Bapt^'st Theological 
Seminary, The Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, The Baptist 
Bible Institute, The W.M.U. Trajining School. 

Under the control of the State Convention there are the following schools: 
Wake Forest College, Meredith College, Chowan College, Wingate College. 
Mars H'ill College, Ciampbell College, Boiling Springs Junior College. 

In the Work of providing adequately for our Christian schools in their God 
given mission, every church, both large and small, and every member of 
every church should have a constant aind practical part. 



16 Fifty-fifth Annual Session 

Let every Baptist fortify with substantial gifts and fervent prayers, our 
Christian schools in this hour of crisis. 

In order that consciousness and the consciences of our Christian people 
may be deepened I have provided for distribution, copies of Dr. Greorge W. 
Truett's matchless address on the subject to which I am greaVly indebted. 

C. D. BAIN, 

REPORT ON FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

According to Dr. Carver, "Missions is the extensive realization of God's 
redemptive purpose through Christ Jesus by human agencies." In other 
words, missions is sending the good news of salvation to those who have it 
not. Always we are eager to share our good news pertaining to material 
blessings; we are always ready to give evidence of growth In temporal suc- 
cesses. Along with this, we are ready to witness for any spiritual growth 
that has been ours by giving unto the Lord that which is his. 

Several years ago at the Southern Baptist Convention, a report from one 
of the Chinese provinces had this striking statement in it: "We,i the women 
of this province, have decided to study geography, in the light of the great 
commission." We as Baptists, need to get out our geography and again 
see what all nations means. 

God has blessed the work on the foreign, fields this past year, despite the 
fact that there have been malny difficulties, there have been encouragements 
that make us know that God's plan has not changed for the spread of the 
Gospel. The past year has teen marked by great revivals in many fields. 
13,250 baptisms were reported, a thousand more than has ever been reported 
in a single year before. When we consider that a baptism on the foreign 
field means a tested Christian we must realize that God is working his pur- 
I-cse out in the hearts of the nations. In our land, all that is necessary to 
obtain ba^ptism is a verbal statement of belief in Christ as the Saviour of 
men; but in other countries the applicant for baptism must give visual 
evidence 'of regeneration and eagerness to follow the Master over a. period 
of weeks and months before he is allowed to be baptized. From this we will 
understand that baptized a believer becomes a missionary. 

To mention all the fields and the progress that has been miade will not 
be possible, but a few items will indicate what the tendency is. In Italy, 
1929 was the best year in the Italian mission work. There were 294 bap- 
tisms, an increase, of 49 per cent. There was an increase of 30 per cent in 
the amount contributed to the support of the work. Tn South China there 
were about 600 baptisms. Pool to Girl's School celebrated its fortieth anni- 
versary by the opening of a new school building which cost $40,000.00. This 
building w?is given entirely by the Chinese. In Africa, the Nigerian Bap- 
tist Convention has made fine progress. It has now 200 churches in its 
membership, practically all of which are self-suppiorting. 

On the foreign field there are 1407 churches with a membership of 161,- 
059. The native contributions amounted to $472,820.12. 

The debt on the Foreign Mission Board was reduced $187,423.56 during the 
last year closing May 1, 1930. I wish we might mention all the fields a,nd 



Little Rivek Association. 17 

the great work that has been and is being done by our faiihful missionaries- 
and native Clhristians, but aniolher side of the matter must be spoken of. 

Last year, mention wa^s made of the fact that missions in general were 
suffering because of the diverting of a larger proportion of the offerings, 
than seemed proper to local work. This year, this isituation is more alarm- 
ing than most lof us seem to ^realize. The great outlay of funds for local 
work is not bearing fruit for the Gospel's sake as it should. In our owa 
Association, perhaps there is as little of funds applied for local work as one 
will find anyw^here; and yet four times as much has been spent for local 
work as has been given for all the objects to which we contribute for mis- 
si- ns. 

From May, 1929, to October, 1929, S.B.C. gifts to Foreign Missions amount- 
ed to $230,568.25. From May to October, 1930, giftsi amounted to $191,368.25. 

Thirty per cent of our churches in the S. B. C. give nothing to missions. 
Out of the 24,010 Baptist churches in the South, 282 give 50 per cent or 
more of their total budgets to missions. 

1,060 churches give from 34% to 49% to missions. 

1 340 churches give from 26% to 33% to missions. 

6,685 churches give from 11% to 25% to missions. 

6,855 churches give less than 10% to missions. 

"Underneath, and all round, and all through the financial difficulties and 
problems of the Southern Biaptists is this problem of informing the people. 
The only possible explanajtion of our Baptist record is that 70% of our peo- 
ple do not know even the fundamental facts about! the needs of our denomi- 
national! work iQT their ability to supply those needs. 

"Two things in particular must be made plain and pressed home upon the 
minds and hearts and consciences of the great m;a,sses of Southern Baptists 
if we are ever to get out of the wilderness of doubt and debt^ disaster and 
defeat: 

I. Southern Elaptis'si are able to give five times what they are now giv. 
ing . The time has come to lay this ghost of "poverty" in the dust and put 
an endl to croaking ahout "hard times" and to give great gifts to missions 
and benevolences to the ends of the earth. 

II. "Southern Baptists must see and feel the heart-treaking needs of the- 
work. Less than 1.000,000 of our 3,800,000 Baptists ever see a denomina- 
tional paper. Over 615.000 Baptist homes have in them nO' source of informa- 
tion or inspiration or encouragement in the greaft work of Southern Baptists. 
How can we excuse ourselves in the face of the fact that from 10 to 13 thou- 
sand of our churches in the South go year in and year out without one 
appeal being made to them by any one whoi knows the facts, to com© up to 
the help of the Lord and his great mission caiuses?" (Home and Foreign^ 
Fields). 



18 



Fifty-fifth Annual Session 



This table given by Dr. McGlothldn, Preisident of the S. B. C, is self ex- 
planatory: 





Total Gifts 


Gifts to 




Gifts to 


Per Cent 


Gifts to 




Years 


for All 


All Local 


Per Cent 


State 




S.B.C. 


Per Cent 




Purposes 


Church 
Objects 




Convention 
Object.-s 




Objects 




1925 


$39,027,009 


$30,771,571 


78-1- 


$3,568,483 


9- 




$4,686,951 


12-1- 


1926 


40,106,852 


31,884,315 


79-!- 


4,199,553 


10- 




4,022,985 


10-1- 


1927 


40,038,250 


32.133,481 


80-1- 


5.986,744 


12- 




2,918,034 


7-- 


1928 


39,927,910 


32.i52o,121 


81-- 


4,:^75,332 


10- 


- 


3.027.456 


7-- 


1929 


39,337,148 


31,695,818 


80- - 


5,414,039 


18- 


- 


2,227,290 


5-1- 



He says: "Considering the above, it is obvious to any tbcughtful man that 
the Southern Baptist Convention will cease to be a working force in the 
world if these same tendencies continue five years longer. We shall then 
have shrunk back upon our state and local work. . . . Is our general work 
to perish? Are we to lose our place in the glorious task of Christianizing 
the world?" 

Our missionaries are overworked; and yet, when the time for furlough 
arrives, many refuse to come home for fear that they may not get back to 
their fields. In Pnigtu, China, a Lone nurse calls for a doctor to man the. 
hospital while Dr. Yocum takes his furlough. Mr. Leonard of Rarbin, Man- 
churia pleads for a helper in that vast field. The China Inland Mission is 
opening up new fields of work while Southern Baptists are closing up sta- 
tions already established. One woman in South America said, "You must 
send help soon; I cannot hold out much longer." 

"Stir me, oh! stir me. Lord. I care not how. 

But stir my heart in passicn for the world I 

Stir me to give, to go — ^but m'ost to pray; 

Stir, till the blood-red banner be unfurled 

O'er lands that still in heathen darkness lie; 

O'er deserts where no Cross is lifted high." 

MRS. ABBIE BENTON BONSTEEL. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS. 



Our Sunday School or Church School has develoi ed, in a short period of 
time, into an outstanding organization throughout the Chlristian countries 
of the world. In making a study cf this organization, relative to its func- 
tion, how it came about, its influence and present status, it would be inter- 
esting to know some hingi about the history of such an lorganiza^tion. Spec- 
ially should this he true at our As-sociaticn (this year when we are making 
an historical study of our churches and are celebrating our hundredth anni- 
versary rs an organized denomination. 

The Sunday School is not unlike a larg? segmen' of our secular history 
for we trace the origin of this organization back to England. Robert Raikes 
has been called the "Father of our Sunday School Movement." However 
he is not altogether entitled to this distinotiion. About 1775 he stajr'ted his 



Little River Association. 19 

organized work, but this was very much unlike our Sunday School work of 
today. His schools would open early in the morning and last until twelve 
o'clock. They would close for an ho'ur's recess then the children would re- 
turn for an afternoon sessicn. Some of his schooLsi that were organized in 
this country would open at six o'clock and close at twelve for the morning 
session. For the afternoon session they would open at two o'clock and close 
at six. This was all the school advantagei the poor people had. Before 
Raikes organized his work, Erasmus Luther, Xavier, Carlo Borromeo, Count 
Zinzendorf and others emphasized religious education in the churches and 
their work was carried out very much like that of Raikes. To Miss Hannah 
Ball, of England, we would probably give the title "Mother of our Modern 
Sunday School." About 1765, several years prior to Raikes announcement 
she establishsd her organized classes and held the school session just before 
the church hour, very much like we do today. 

To select this date as beginning, our Sunday School is only 165 yc'ars of 
age, from the time of its inoaption in England. It was through the influence 
of Robert Raikes that the Sunday School work was brought to the United 
States. At first the Sunday Schools were thought of largely for the poor. 
It was through thsise church schools that the American poor people gained 
freedom to the pathway of an education. Just as a m::;tter of record some* 
of the early dates of Sunday School organization are heregiven: Organiza- 
tion by Bishop Asbury, of Virginia, 1786; by th: Me hodist Conference, 
Charleston, S. C, 1790; in Philc^elphia, 1791; The First Day or Sunday 
School Society, New York. 1793; in New Jersey 1794; in Pawtucket, R. I., 
1797. ' In 1803 a number of schools were^ organized in New York City by Mr. 
and Mrs. Divi^ Be'hune. The American Sunday School Union was not or- 
ganized until 1824. According to historical records of organized Sunday 
Schools in America we only cover a teriod cf 144 years. The Methodist de- 
nomination wrs the first to give impietus to hB Sunday School work in the 
church. The Baptist early recognized the importance of Sunday School work 
and became pioneers in the fie Id of eacher training. All the greater denom- 
inations today recognize tbe importgnce cf Sunday School work. 

The perennial battle ground of Christi.in religion today is ths- Sunday 
School. It is here that the foundation stones of the Christian life are laid. 
It is here that attitudes, aptitides, and habits are formed that will determine 
destiny. Here influencss are set in motion that will only break upon the 
shore of eternity. 

The work of the Sunday School, should be^ and is the electric dynamO' of 
the church's power ?nd the vernal fi;ilds of the pastor's hopes and aspira- 
tions. There is no organization in the land ^oday in which its Christian 
leaders touch a si many lives as in our Sunday Schools. In ths Baptist Sun- 
ciay Schools of the South there are three million pupils. In North Carolina, 
last year there were 2,195 school® with a membership of 346,639. The Lit- 
tle River Association reported 22 schools with a membership of 4470. A 
marvelous opportunity is hqre placed in the hands of teachers and admin- 
istrators to indoctrinate and enlist the people of our churches in the educa- 
tional, mdssionary, and benevolent ministry of the churches. Our Church 



20 ElFTY-FIFTH AnNUAL SeSSION 

membership in Little River Association is 4,859. The Sunday School emroU- 
ment is 4,470 or 389 less than the church membership. It is interesting to 
note that there are seven Sunday Schools in the county with a totaL member- 
ship larger than that of the church, Dunn, Erwin. Kennebec, LiLlington, 
Finey Grove, Rawls and Swann Station. 

There are 5,000,000 white people in our towns and cities not enrolled in 
the Sunday Schools. Thqre are 15,773,707 white rural people in our terri- 
tory not enrolled in any Sunday School. How many of these are Baptist? 
Its problematical. Literally millions of them are not members of any church. 
A portion of these unreached millions is in our own Association, and within 
reach of our churches. Is God counting us responsible. 

The Sunday School in the church is a manifesta;tion of church life, an out- 
go of energy, a method of activity with a definite purpose and aim. No 
orator's word or painter's brush can portray the dynamic power of the Sun- 
day School in its present commanding character or measure its power as an 
instrument in the hands of God to save thq nation from moral bankruptcy. 
It is a fathomless educational power fusing its ever enlightening spirit into 
the hearts of men and womein, boys and girls. 

There is no doubt about our duty to build great churches enlarge our 
schools and colleges, build and place throughout th© land our hospitals and 
homes of healing, advance our missionary movement extend the reach and 
ministry of eleemosynary institutions. These we should not neglect. Where 
possible, we should give of our wealth and endow them with our millions. 
But. we should by all means teach God'iS' personal letter to his pupils. "For 
God so loved the world that He gave his only begotten Son that whosoever 
believeth on him should not perish but have everlasting life." 

The objectives of cur Sunday School Department are: 

1. To increase Sunday School Fnrollment. 

2. To departmentalize and grade the Sunday School. 

3. To secure better equipment. 

4. To train teachers and officers. 

.'). To interest and enlist the church members. 

6. To develop better teachers mnd teaching. 

7. To win the lost. 

8. To utilize the members in service. 

9. To stress church and d&nominaticnal loyalty. 

10. To honor Jesus in our life's program and promote his Kingdom work. 

We further recommend to our teaching staff, supervisors and superin- 
tendents that they work up a profe=sionql library in every Sunday SchooL 
A few outstanding books for teachers and superintendents may be mentionecl 
here: 

Tarbell's Teachers Guide, $1.90. 
Peloubet's Xote^s, .$1.90. 
The Lesson Round Table, $L25. 
Moore's Points cf Emphasis, 35 rents. 
Arnold's Practical Commentary. 90 cents. 



Little Eivek Association. 21 

Catalog-ue of supplies for all departments of the, church, free. 
Holiday Catalogue and Gift Suggestionsi, free. 
The Blue Gold Dollar Library (10' books) $1.00 (each). 

All the above can be obtained from Secretary Perry Morgan. Baptist Book 
Shop, Raleigh N. 0. 
Again we recommend: 

1. That every Sunday School in Little River Association hold Workers' 
Council meetings, whether the Sundaiy School! has been departmentalized, 
standardized or not and devel'op plans for a greater Sunday School. 

2. That every Sunday School send delegates to our Convemtion in Raleigh 
next June. 

3. That we iset as our goal, every church member enlisted in our Sunday 
School and every member of our Sunday School a church member. 

4. That we keep ever before us the aim of employing a full time Sunday 
School and B.Y.P.U. worker in the Little River Association 

5. That we organize our Sunday Schocl- forces to assist the pastor in en- 
listing miambers at all times specially during evangelistic campaigns. 

6. That our Sunday School work as its aim to hold the Sunday School 
membership through the church service. 

''It your heart is hungry for happy haunts, and yooi^ are hunting for fellow- 
ship and good will 
If you thirst for service a thousand things that will thrust you through 
with thrills 
If your spirits are sad and sinking and you are sighing for spiritual sunlit 
scenes 
Then join the band of Sunday School workers where religious leaders con- 
vene. 
You can roam in these realms of rapturfe' or pose in this rare retreat. 
Where spiritual atmosphere develops the soul and religious leaders meet. 
"^Viiere you find fellowship in Christian readeriship glorifying the Giver of 

the good. 
In tho field of Christian service where God's will is understood." 

(V. M. Hartfield.) 
Riespectfully submitted, 

B. D. BUNN. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS. 

North Carolina Baptists are this year completing one hundred years of 
organized effcrt. At the veiry beginning our fathers mads plans for evange- 
lizing North Carolina. If the record of these one hundred years were ex- 
amined, it would be found that many of our strong 8,nd generous churches 
in the leading towns and centers of the state, were organized and planted 
tTjrough the sacrificial labors of faithful state missionarifs. 

Sometimes we hear the idea advanced that foon we wilil have finished the 
job of Stato Missions and that all the needy and promising fields will be 
occupied. But with the ever changing conditions and the rapid growth of 
the state in industrialiism, in good roads, in public education, in the rapid 



22 Fifty-fifth Annual Session 

shift of the population from the country to the town and city, there comes 
with every new genera.tion new opportunities and new responsibilities for 
evangelizing and saving our own people. 

In thei per centage division of our 'Co- operative funds, State Missions reu 
ceive twenty cents out of the dollar. In addition to this 'all funds given 
through the Sunday Schools en State Mission Day, the Last Sunday in Octo- 
ber, goes to State Missions as an extra amount. 

This year there are eighty-four missionaries in the employ of the Board, 
serving about one hundred and fifty churches. The Board is caring for the 
Sunday School, W.M.U.., BLY.P.U. and Student Work. This year we took 
the Indian Work among the Indians in Robeson County and the Cherokee in 
Swain County. 

The task is greater and the need is more imperative today than whqn our 
fathers began the work one hundred yeiar® ago. We hope every pastor will 
preach on State Missions during October, which is Staf^e Mission month 
'throughout the South, and that every Sunday School will put en the State 
Mission program th? last Sunday in October. Our Board is heavily handi- 
capped with a debt, and every church and Sunday School; is urged to halve a 
worthy part in this great statewdo effort to lift the burden from our State 
Tvlission work. C. W. FLOWERS, 

Committee. 

REPORT ON HOSPITAL. 

John sent his disciples to Jesus to ask him "Ar. thou the Christ, or shall 
we look for* another?" Jesus -said to them, "Go teLl John, the blind see, the 
lame walk, the d:af hear, a.nd the poor have the gospel preached to them." 

Dur Baptist Hospital in VVinston-Salem is trying to follow the Master by 
relieving suffering humanity. In the year 1929 the report ishows that 2 725 
patients were entered. 395 of th:se were lull charity, and 1,009 pafrt pay. 
Many of this number would have died, b.i:l it liot "een for the helping hand 
(f the Baptist Hospital. 

Does it pay to save suffering humanity? Jesus thcught so. The call 
comes to every Baptist of the State to invest in saving suffering humanity. 

There are in this bos])it:il 37 student nurses, and 6 graduate nurses. The 
hospital has cared fcr 15,322 ialien^s. riicr: than 6,GC0 of these have been full 
charity. In the year 1930, 50% of the days spent in the hospital by patients 
have been charity da.ys, except $1.00 per day from the Duke Foundation 
Fund. The hospital finances are nearly $10,000 behind last year. Shall we 
not come to the rad of the insti ution th'^t is doing so much to re'ieve suffer- 
ing, and making homes happy? Respectfully submitted, 

JAMFS A. BUCHANAN, Committee. 

REPORT ON B.Y.P.U. 

Physical fitne s is a magic token which helps to open for one the doors 
to happiness, success, and joyful service. It adds to all the pleiasures of life 
and enables one to enter into his work and play with confidence and vigor. 



Little Rivek Association^. 23: 

But physica|l fitness alone doejSi not suffice. A life that is not equipped with 
the spiritual weapons is unbalajnced. Spiritual fitness is essentiol if one is 
able to overcome the problems of this life and to look forward to the beau- 
tiful life beyond. 

If the athlete needs to go "in training" for his game, and the scIcUot must 
undergo constant "drilling" for his service how much more important i is 
for your boy apd girl to go into training for the build ng of a beautiful 
Christian character. The B.Y.P.U is the Lest place to secura the training. 

Realizing the need for training and growth in our churches, the B.Y.P. 
U. workers of the South, mapped out the following calendar which if fol-. 
lowed carefully with provide Growth Material for our spiritual need: 

OBJECTIVE-^aiROWTH IN GRACE. 

January — A Goal of Excellence for 1930. 

February — ^Growing Through Daily Bible Reading and Prayer. 

March — Growing Through Study. 

April — ^Growing Through Giving. 

Miaiy — ^Growing Through Decision. 

June' — ^Growing Through Christian Peillowship. 

July — Growing Through Expansion. 

August— Growing Through Soul-Winning. 

September — iGrowing Through Enlargam.ent. 

October — ^Growing Through Increased Efficiency. 

November^ — ^Growing Through Church and Denominational Loyalty. 

Decembsir — ^Growing Through World-wide Service. 

This ca^lendar was adopted by our State Associational and local B.Y.P.U. 
The monthly B.Y.P.U. Magazine and Quarterly provides adequate material 
for all the B.Y.P.U. prbgrams. 

The keynote of our twenty-first annual State Convention which met at 
Mars Hill College, June 24-26, was Growth in Grace. The music, addresses, 
de,m'on2itrations, conferences, and special features of this program were 
gieat. The Convention set its goal for this year as folLows: 

New Unions 500, Standard Unions 760, increase in enrollment 12,250, new 
General Organizs^tions 75. new Associational; Organizations 5. standard Asso- 
ciations 13, circulation B.Y.P.U. magazinei 3,650, Study Course Awards 
23 530. Tithers 5,000. . 

Our Associaitional B.Y.P.U., under the leadership of Carl Ousley, has 
perhaps made more progress than in a(ny previous year. The officers have 
been ever ready when he called. Among some of the things that should be 
noted are: 

■ Number of churches in the Association 22. ( 

Number of churches with B.Y.P.U.'s 13. 

Number of 'General Organizations 6. 

Number of B.Y.P.U.'s — Adult 1, Seniors 20, Intermediates 8, Juniors 7, 
total 36. 

Number of new Unions 18. 



24 Fifty-fifth Annual Session 

Number of A-1 Unions at least one-quartex during the year 12. 

N'umber of Study Courses held 28. 

Number of Associational Conventions 1. 

Number of District Rallies 10. 

Number of letters and postals written by officers 196. 

Number of miles traveled 2,104.. 

Number of phons calls 25. 

Visits made to churches 39, 

Representatives at the State Convention 1. 

Representatives at the Regional Convemtion 5. 

Representatives at Reigional Banquet 16. 

Let every Church who desires consecrated, dependable, 'Ohristian leader- 
ship in carrying out the Great Commission, set about fostering the B.Y. 
P.U. Organization. 

ZULA ROGERS. 

Committee. 

REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK. 

Another year gone by and the fields of our As&ociaition are still "white unto 
harveist." 

It is possible to become so satisfying with our past achievenientis that we 
fail to see our obligation to ever press upward and onward. As we look to 
the future we hope thait aLl are making plans for greater and bigger things. 

On this new year let each strive toward the perfection of the Standard of 
Excellence. May the year 1931 find many A-1 Uuions in our churcheis. 
"Therefore, be ye steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the work of" — 
the text points of the Standard of Excellence. 

We believe that more work a^nd m;ore thorough work can be done through 
organization. The women of Little River Association are organized but not 
100 per cent. One of the ideals toward which weu are working is a wide 
awake W.M.U. and its auxiliaries in every church. May we count on all 
the Societies aind pastors for their loyal support in reaching this aim. 

We wish that we may have a wave of consecration throughout our Asso- 
ciation and an awakening in the hearts of our women to the realization of 
the possihilities and privileges in Christ's service. Let's continue steajdfast 
in the tasks that are before us. So with thanksgiving and praise for His 
l)iessings may we "press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling 
cf God in Christ Jesus.'* 

MRS. PAUL B'RADILBY. 



Little River Association^ 25 



Woman's Missionary Union. 



Holly Springs Baptist Church. 

Thursday, August 7, 1930. 

The meeting was called to order by Mrs. Paul Bradley, the Superintendent. 

The devotional was ledj by Mrs. H. Y. Smith; Mrs. J. G. Lay ton leading 
in prayer. 

Roll call of Societies — 'Antioch, Buie's Cresk, Chalybeate, Coats, Dunn, 
Holly Springs, Lillington asd Broadway responding. 

Superintendent's/ Report — (See report). 

The plan of the prescribed Mission Study Courses was given us by Mrs. 
J. G., Laytoh who urged us to read more in order toi become better acquaint- 
ed with Missions. 

Mrs. Duncan urged each Society to keep "Fellowship Week," N|ovember 
7th and 8th. 

Mrs. C. E. Sorrell showed us by pester and pLaylet as to "Where Our 
Dollars Go." 

Misisi Alva iLawrence's address on "Missionary Training for Our Young 
People" was inspirational and thought provoking. 

Committees appointed by Superintendent: 

Nominating Committe — Mesdames J. B. Tugwell, J. P. Blackmon W. 
E. Nichols. 

Time and Plr^ce Committee—HMesdames C. E. Sorrell, G. W. O'Quinn, H. 
G. Smith. 

Pastors Hall and Ayscue were recognized and then we were dismissed for 
dinner by Mr. Hall. 



EVENING SERVICE. 

Hymn— *'A11 Hail the Power of Jesus' Name." 

Mrs. W. E. Nichols led the devotional using the 23rd Psalm as basis for 
her remarks. 

Prayer by Miss Mattie Bain. 

Playlet "To The Radiant Life," by the Girls Auxiliary of the Mamers 
Church wajs enjoyed. 

Rev. R. F. Hall addressed the meetisg on "Go ye into all the world an^d 
preach the Gospel." A real missionary message. 

'T^ore of Self, Less of Thee," by Mrs. I. B. Andrews revealed toi us the 
great falling off in our gifts to missions — America spending so muchi for self. 

After expressing thanks to the speakers for their co-operation the Super- 
intendent called for the re4);orts of the committees: 

Nominating Committee reported for Superintendent, Mrs. Paul Bradley 



26 



Fifty-fifth A^xfal Session 



Secretary, Mrs. V. L. Stephens; Leader of Young Feople, Miss Mattie Bain;. 
Mission Study Chairman, Mrs. J. G. Layton; Personal Service Leader, Mrs. 
Duncan. 

Time and PL.jce Committee: Broadway Church, h^st Thursday in August, 

Both reports were adopted. 

Miss Mat;ie Bain calLd attention to Associational expense wliich was. 
pledged by societies. 

Mrs. Paul Bradley asked that each society pledge twenty-five cents for a 
loving-cup. 

Motion was madc> and adopted. 

Special music was furnished by :Miss Marshbank and Miss Duncan, to 
the pleasure of all. 

A rising- vote cf thanks for their geneious hospi ality was extended to the 
IJolly Springs Society. 

•'Bl:st be the Tie that Binds." followed ly prayer "cy Rev. Ayscue sent us 
ba(k to . ur homes lioping to do greater things for the Master. 

MRS. PAUL BRADLEY, Supt. 
MRS. V. L. STEPHENS. Sec. 



WOMAN'S WORK OF 


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B. y. p. U.'s OF LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 



CHURCHES 



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Antioch 

Baptist Chapel 

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Bethel 

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Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs. 

Coats 

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Erwin 

Friendship 

Holly Springs 

K^eunebec 

LiiHington 

Macedonia 

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MINUTES 

OF THE 

LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

Fifty-Sixth and Fifty-Seveiith 
Annual Sessions 

HELD WITH 

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH, NOV. 3 AND 4, 1931 
AND "^ 

PINEY GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH, NOV. 1 AND 2, 1932 



J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator, 19 31 Dunn, N. C. 

J. E. AYSCUE, Moderator, 1932 Buie's Creek, N. C. 

E. NORFLEET GARDNER, Vice-Moderator Dunn, N. C. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk-Treasurer Buie's Creek, N. C. 



The next session meets with Holly Springs Baptist Church, near | 
Broadway, N. C, November 1 and 2, 1933. 



To preach the Associational Sermon, Rev. S. L. Morgan or his 
alternate, Rev. L. L. Johnson. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

Fifty-Sixth and Fifty-Seventh 
Annual Sessions 

HELD WITH 

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH, NOV. 3 AND 4, 1931 
AND 
PINEY GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH, NOV. 1 AND 2, 1932 



J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator, 19 31 Dunn, N. C. 

J. E. AYSCUE, Moderator, 19 32 Buie's Creek, N. C. 

E. NORFLEET GARDNER, Vice-Moderator Dunn, N. C. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk-Treasurer Buie's Creek, N. C. 



The next session meets with Holly Springs Baptist Church, neai 
Broadway, N. C, November 1 and 2, 1933. 



To preach the Associational Sermon, Rev. S. L. Morgan or his 
alternate, Rev. L. L. Johnson. 



The 1931 Session 



The Little River Association met in its 5 6th Session with Friend- 
ship Baptist Church, November 3 and 4, 19 31. 

Sufficient funds were not sent up by the churches to have minutes 
printed. For this reason the Clerk is having the proceedings printed 
in the 19 32 Minutes, omitting reports and all tables except one, a 
summary of the same as published in the convention minutes. 

J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk. 



DEIiEGATES AND VISITORS ENROLL.ED AT 1931 SESSION 

ANGIER — W. H. Ford, C. W. Flowers, Mrs. C. TV. Flowers, Mrs. Ray 

Matthews, Mrs. W. H. Stephenson, Mrs. Perry Surles, Mrs. Alex 

Lee, Mrs. Dennis Overby, Miss Ila Floyd Owen. 
ANTIOCH — W. W. McLean, Osee Rogers, H. G. Patterson, J. R. 

Patterson, J. C. Bullock, Mrs. J. C, Bullock. 
BAPTIST CHAPEL — A. L. Smith. 

BAPTIST GROVE — R. W. Wester, C. L. Mitchell, J. T. Thomas. 
BETHEL — J. A. West, C. M. Elmore. 
BROADWAY — H. M. Thomas, Mrs. H. M. Thomas, Mrs. D. J. Thomas, 

Mrs. Wm. Thomas, H. S. Cox, Mrs. H. S. Cox, Miss Sadie Lee, 

Miss Virginia Lee, A. A. Collins. 
BUIE'S CREEK^C. E. Edwards, Mrs. C. E. Edwards, J. L. Turling- 
ton, Mrs. L. J. Turlington, Mrs. F. F. Gregory, J. A. Campbell, 

Mrs. J. A. Campbell, Mrs. J. F. Blackman, Mrs. I. M. Jerkins, 

Mrs. J. N. Gregory. 
CHALYBEATE SPRINGS — D. B. Andrews, Mrs. D. B. Andrews, R. F. 

Hall, C. K. Smith, Mrs. C. K. Smith, L. B. Smith, Mrs. L. B. 

Smith, Mrs. D. H. Senter, E. W. Smith, Mrs. E. W. Smith, R. W. 

McDonald, Mrs. R. W. McDonald, Miss Cora Smith, W. C. 

Marshburn. 
COATS — Owen Odum, Mrs. Owen Odum, A. D. Willams, Mrs. W. E. 

Nichols, Miss Mattie Bain. 
CUMBERLAND UNION — Carl Ousley. 
DUNN — E. N. Gardner, H. B. Taylor, J. C. Clifford, L. F. Bailey, 

Mrs. G. T. Noel, Mrs. E. C. Kellar, Mrs. Sam Broughton, Mr^. 

R. L. Deensing, Mrs. C. D. Bain, Mrs. C. R. Vinson, Mrs. J. B. Lee, 

Mrs. C. L. Guy, Miss Minnie Guy, Mrs. J. M. Morgan, Mrs. R. A. 

Dunson. 
ERWIN — S. A. Rhyne, A. R. Hall, Mrs. A. R. Hall, A. H. Perry, 

J. H. McKee, J. y^. Darroch, J. B. Sessones, C. C. Hall, Mrs. 

C. C. Hall, R. M. N. Byrd, Mrs. Archie Woodworth, Mrs. L. 

Jackson. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



FRIENDSHIP — C. M. Allen, Mrs. C. M. Allen, A. F. Jones, H. S. Byrd, 

Mrs^ H. S. Byrd,, L.: L. Johnson 
HOLLY SPRINGS — H. Y. Smith, Mrs. H. Y. Smith, R. T. Smith, Mrs. 
Minnie Thomas, M. C. Thomas, Alton Olive, W. J. "Wilson, Mrs. 

W. J. Wilson, J. A. Buchanan, Mrs. J. A. Buchanan. 
KENNEBECK — W. E. Bond, W. O. McLean, Noland McLean, Miss 

Avis Smith, Miss Irene Smith, W. T. Olive, C. V^. Brown. 
LILLINGTON — B. P. Gentry, Mrs. B. P. Gentry, Mrs. J. B. Tugwell,. 
MACEDONIA — J. E. Holt, Mrs. J. E. Holt, J C. Smith. 
NEILL'S CREEK — A. W. Faircloth, J. O. McLeod. 
OAK GROVE — J. D. Betts, M. L. Deening, R. S. Matthews, Mrs. 

R. S. Matthews. 
PINEY PROVE — R. E. Atkins, Mrs. R. E. Atkins, W. B. Jones, A. S. 

Austin, Mrs. W. B. Jones, Mrs. O. D. Lyon, Miss Nannie Austin, 

Mrs. J. D. Betts, Miss Georgia Betts, Y. A. Betts, Mrs. Y. A. 

Betts. 
RAWLES — G. N. Ashley. 
SWANN'S STATION — D. A. Graham, E. C. Womack, L. G. Holt, 

J. G. Spivey, Miss Pauline Clark. 
VISITORS — J. A. McMillan, W. R. Beach, C. A. Upchurch, L. B. 

Olive, Mrs. D. W. Herring. 



FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



PROCEEDINGS 



BUNNLEVEL, N. C, 
Tuesday, November 3, 19 31. 

The Little River Association met in its Fifty-sixth Annual sesssion, 
day and place named above. 

S. A. Rhyne conducted the devotional services founded on prayer 
as recorded in fourth chapter of Acts. Prayer by W. H. Ford. 
Former Moderator J. C. Clifford called the body to order and Clerk, 
J. A. Campbell, recorded the proceedings. Roll of churches called 
and all were represented, except Bethel and Swann's Station, repre- 
sented later in the session. 

Delegates and Messengers enrolled. Visitors welcomed, among 
them Rev. W. R. Beach, representing the Biblical Recorder, and Mrs. 
D. W. Herring, former missionary to China. B. P. Gentry read the 
report on Sunday Schools and the report is adopted. Mrs. C. E. 
Edwards read for Mrs. Abbie Binsteel the report on Baptist Literature. 
After discussion by W. R. Beach, the report is adopted. 

Additional visitors recognized — Perry Morgan representing the 
Co-operative Program; Mrs. Perry Morgan, J. A. McMillan, represent- 
ing the Mills Home; L. B. Olive, returned missionary; C. A. Upchurch, 
representing the Anti-Saloon League. 

By request of J. A. Campbell, appointee, E. N. Gardner, alternate, 
preached the introductory sermon. 

Carl Ousley read the Scriptures and J. A. Campbell led the prayer. 
Subject of sermon — "Christ the Light of the World." Benediction by 
J. E. Ayscue. 

On motion, they adjourned one hour for lunch. 



AFTERNOON SESSION 



The devotional services are conducted by W. H. Ford. 

On motion, the next Association meets with Piney Grove Church. 

Moderators names the following Committee on Appointments: 
W. E. Bond, L. F. Bailey, Miss Mattie Bain. 

Reports on State Missions is read by Mrs. C. D. Bain, on Foreign 
Missions by R. F. Hall and J. E. Ayscue is requested to write report 
on Home Missions. 

L. Benne Olive, returned missionary from China, delivers an 
address of great power on Foreign Missions, and reports are adopted. 

E. N. Gardner has charge of the Every Member Canvass, calling 
on several to speak as follows: 

1. Benefits to Local Church Contributions — Owen Odum. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



2. Benefits to Local Church Enlistment — R. E. Atkins. 

3. The Part of the Women in the Canvass — Mrs. W. E. Nichols. 

4. Benefits to World-Wide Missions — Mrs. C. D. Bain. 

5. Practical Plans for Putting on Canvass — H. B. Taylor. 

6. Planning for the Canvass — E. N. Gardner. 

7. The General Program — Perry Morgan. 
Adjourned for the evening session. Benediction. 



EVENING SESSION 



The Associational B. Y. P. U. directed the session. Song, "Stepping 
in the light." Prayer by Miss Ruth Snipes. Devotional services 
conducted by Miss Flora Lee Holloway, Intermediate B. Y. P. U. 
Leader. Subject, "Walking With Jesus." Prayer, E. N. Gardner. 

B. Y. P. U. report, Carl Ousley writer, was read by C. L. Mitchell. 
Report was discussed by Miss Zula Rogers, president of the B. Y. 
P. U. for the Association — 2 54 representatives were present — from 
Antioch 29, Broadway 25, Buie's Creek 38, Chalybeate Springs 4, 
Dunn 34, Erwin 5, Friendship 68, Holly Springs 5, Lillington 18, 
Baptist Grove 1, Neill's Creek 1, visitors 2 6. 

Fuquay Springs rendered quartet. Miss Winnie Rickett, State 
Intermediate B. Y. P. U., told in dramatic way the account of her 
trip to Europe the past summer. Trumpet solo was rendered by 
B. I. Tart, Jr., Campbell College. 

Playlet: "The Conversion of Farmer Brown to the Doctrine of 
Stewardship," was rendered by the Fuquay Springs B. Y. P. U. 

Benediction by Winston Pearce. 



WEDNESDAY'S SESSION 

Devotional exercises conducted by J. A. McMillan, Mill's Home. 
Subject: "The Importance of Obedience." In the absence of J. A. 
Campbell, Clerk R. F. Hall acted as Clerk pro. tem. 

Report on our Hospitals is read by F. D. Byrd, and is adopted. 

The Orphanage was discussed by J. A. McMillan. He also dis- 
cussed the subjects of Hospitals and Aged Ministers' Relief. Report 
on Orphanage was read by W. E. Bond and report adopted. 

Report on Christian Education, prepared by Owen Odum was 
read by E. N. Gardner. On motion to adopt, the report is dis-" 
cussed by L, E. M. Freeman, Meredith College, and report is adopted. 

C. E. Edwards reads the report on Aged Ministers. Report adopted. 

E. N. Gardner reports for Committee appointed at the last session 
to make special investigation as to work of the Relief and Annuity 
Board. 



6 FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

C. A, Upchurch spoke to the report on Law Enforcement, report 
to be furnished by M. M. Jernigan to the Clerk later. Offering 
amounting to $9.10 was made to help along the expenses of the 
Anti-Saloon League. 

Reports on Appointments was read by W. E. Bond and adopted. 
Resolution of Thanks was passed in appreciation of the splendid 
hospitality of the Friendship Church and community. 

The Association adjourned with benediction by G. M. Ashley. 

J. C. CLIFFORD, Moderator. 
J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk. 
R. F. HALL, Assistant Clerk. 



ORDAINED MINISTERS AND PASTORS (1932) 

J. E. AYSCUE Buie's Creek, N. C. 

J. D. BETTS : Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

W. E. BOND _:_ Willow Springs, N.C. 

E. C. CHAMBLEE Buie's Creek, N.C. 

J. A. CAMPBELL Buie's Creek, N.C. 

C. E. EDAVARDS Buie's Creek, N. C. 

L. E. M. FREEMAN Raleigh.N.. C. 

E. N. GARDNER Dunn, N. C. 

L. L. JOHNSON Bunnlevel, N. C. 

B. F. MAULDWIN Gary, N. C. 

S. L. MORGAN Raleigh, N. C. 

S. C. PAGE Rt. 4, Dunn, N. C. 

S. A. RHYNE Erwin, N. C. 

R. E. TRIPP Buie's Creek. N. C. 

R. E. ATKINS - Raleigh, N. C. 

R. F. HALL - Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

G. E. MOTLEY - . Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

CARL OUSLEY Rt. 1, Lillington, N. C. 

J. WINSTON PEARCE Wake Forest, N. C. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL BOARD 

G. G. Page, Buie's Creek; W. M. Morgan, Angier; Mrs. C. D. Bain, 
Dunn. 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

J. A. Campbell, E. N. Gardner, J. F. Blackman, Mrs. Paul Bradley, 
Miss Zula Rogers. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



The 1932 Session 



Piney Grove Baptist Church, 
near Puquay Springs, N. C, 
Tuesday, November 1, 19 32. 

The Little River Baptist Association meets with the above church 
in its Fifty-seventh Annual Session, day and date above mentioned. 
In the absence of former Moderator J. C. Clifford, kept away on 
account of sickness, Vice-Moderator E. Norfleet Gardner called the 
Association to order, who called upon Rev. J. Winston Pearce to 
conduct the devotional exercises. Bro. Pearce chose as his subject 
"Forward With Christ." He went a little further his Scriptural 
foundation. 

On motion, the election of officers is deferred until the afternoon 
session. Visiting brethren are introduced and welcomed as follows: 

Rev. J. S. Farmer, Editor of the Biblical Recorder; Mr. Hugh 
Lattimer, representing the Relief and Annuity Board; Rev. C. H. 
Norris, Raleigh Association; Prof. I. G. Greer, the new manager of 
the Mills Home; Rev. and Mrs. Scott Turner, new residents of our 
Association; Rev. E. B. Booker, Clerk of the New South River Asso- 
ciation; Rev. S. L. Morgan, new pastor at Lillington; Rev. Gerald 
Motley, new pastor at Macedonia; Rev. D. W. Herring, Raleigh Asso- 
ciation. 



The following delegates and visitors are enrolled: 

ANGIER — Mrs. D. W. Denning, Mrs. Perry Surles, Mrs. D. D. Overby, 

Mrs. J. J. Barnes, Mrs. Pearl Parker, Mrs. R. P. Barband, Mrs. 

Wm. Morgan, C. W. Flowers, Mrs. C. W. Flowers. 
ANTIOCH — A. C. Brown, J. R. Brown, W. B. Lynch, Mildred Brown, 

Mrs. A. C. Brown, H. G. Patterson. 
BAPTIST GROVE — C. L. Mitchell, Leo Bridgers, J. A. Gilbert. 
BETHEL — W. G. Elmore. 
BUIE'S CREEK — R. E. Tripp, A. Lincoln Fulk, Mrs. A. B. Bonsteel, 

Mrs. C. E. Edwards, B. F. McLeod, Mrs. J. F. Blackman, Mrs. 

D. A. Honeycutt, Mrs. F. B. Harmon, C. E. Edwards. 
CHALYBEATE SPRINGS — R. F. Hall, C. K. Smith, R. W. McDonald, 

S. L. Veazey, Mrs. D. H. Senter. Mrs. Kemp Smith, Mrs. R. I. 

Latta, R. E. Sm.ith, Mrs. J. F. Andrews, Miss Cora Smith, Geo. 

R. Wells. 
COATS — Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Mrs. T. D. Stewart, Mrs. C. G. Fuquoy, 

J. M. Byrd. 
CUMBERLAND UNION — J. S. Brown. 



FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



DUNN — Mrs. C. D. Bain, Mrs. R. Durham Taylor, Mrs. J. M. Morgan, 
Mrs. J. T. Guy, Mrs. C. L. Guy, E. Norfleet Gardner, Mrs. E. C. 
West, Mrs. Sam Broughton, Mrs. J. A. McLeod. 

ERWIN — J. H. McKee, Mrs. Lottie McKee, Mrs. W. R. Hair, Mrs. 
Bernie Honeycutt, S. A. Rhyne, Mrs. S. A. Rhyne, Mrs. C. R. 
Parker, J. B. Sessones, A. H. Perry, Rhora McN. Byrd, Mrs. 
Walter Byers. 

FRIENDSHIP — Several representatives present, but did not enroll. 

HOLLY SPRINGS — Mrs. W. J. Wilson, Mrs. M. C. Thomas, W. J. 
Wilson, M. C. Thomas, R. T. Smith, Irela Smith, H. Y. Smith, 
Mrs. H. Y. Smith. 

KENNEBEC — Avis Smith, Luther Walker, Ruby Smith, R. Mayton 
Smith. 

LILLINGTON — S. L. Morgan, Mrs. Joel G. Layton, Mrs. Delia Mc- 
Neill, Mrs. J. D. Johnson. 

MACEDONIA — Lena Weathers, J. C. Smith, J. E. Holt. 

OAK GROVE — Emma Earle Upchurch, M. S. Denning, C. H. Up- 
church. 

PINY GROVE — M. D. Honeycutt, R. L. Wilkins, H. O. Austin. 

RAWLES — Beatrice Rawles, J. , S. Barker. 

SWANN'S STATION — E. C. Womack, D. A. Graham, L. Y. Holt, 
I. G. Spivey. 

VISITORS — Rev. J. S. Farmer, Editor Biblical Recorder; Rev. C. H. 
Norris, Wake Forest; Rev. E. B. Booker, Dunn; G. G. Page, 
representing Campbell College; Mrs. J. S. Farmer; Rev. Jesse 
McCarter, Raleigh Association; Rev. L. E. M. Freeman, Meredith 
College; I. G. Greer, representative Mills Home. 
Program Committee offered the following tentative order of busi- 
ness, which was adopted: 



TUESDAY 

100:00 A.M. — Worship: "Forward With Christ in Love for the World," 

J. Winston Pearce, Coats, N. C. 
10:20 A.M. — Organization; Recognition of Visitors; Appointment of 

Committees. 
10:30 A.M. — Religious Literature, Mrs. J. G. Layton. 
11:00 A.M. — Social Service: 

(1) "Mills PTome," R. F. Hall, Chalybeate Springs; 

Supt. I, G. Greer, Thomasville. 
11:45 A.M. — Sermon: J. E. Ayscue, Buie's Creek, N. C; Alternate: 

S. A. Rhyne, Erwin, N. C. 
12:30 P.M. — Dinner. 
1:30 P.M. — Worship: "Forward With Christ in Prayer for the 

World," J. Winston Pearce.' 
1:45 P.M. — Missions: 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



(1) State — S. A. Rhyne, Erwin. 

(2) Home — Mrs. Abbie Bonsteel, Buie's Creek. 

(3) Foreign — B. P. Marshbanks, Buie's Creek. 

(4) Promotion Committee — E. Norfleet Gardner, 
Dunn, N. C. 

3:45 P.M. — Miscellaneous Business. 
4:00 P.M. — Adjournment. 

7:30 P.M. — ^Worship: "Forward With Christ in a Vision of the 
World," J. Winston Pearce. 

45 P.M. — B. Y. P. U.: Miss Zula Rogers, Antioch. 

15 P.M. — Sunday Schools: Herbert B. Taylor. Dunn, N. C. 

45 P.M. — Adjournment. 



WEDNESDAY 



10:00 A.M. — Worship: "Forward With Christ in Serving the World," 

J. Winston Pearce. 
10:20 A.M. — Woman's Work: Mrs. Paul Bradley, Chalybeate Springs; 

S. L. Morgan, Lillington, N. C. 
10:50 A.M. — Social Service: 

(1) Hospital: W^illiam Morgan, Angier. 

(2) Aged Ministers: R. E. Atkins, Piney Grove. 

(3) Temperance and Law Enforcement: B. F. McLeod, 

Buie's Creek. 
11:30 A.M. — Address on Temperance: L. E. M. Freeman, Angier. 
12:15 P.M. — Dinner. 

1:15 P.M. — Worship: "Forward With Christ in Planning for the 
World," J. Winston Pearce. 

1:30 P.M. — Christian Education: Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn. 

2:15 P.M. — State of the Churches: E. Norfleet Gardner, Dunn. 

2:45 P.M. — Obituaries: L. L. Johnson, Friendship. 

2:55 P.M. — Miscellaneous. 

3:00 P.M. — Adjournment. 

The Moderator calls for report on Religious Literature. The report 
not being in hand, on motion, Rev. J. S. Farmer is invited to speak 
on the subject, which he did, followed by C. W. Flowers and others. 

Rev. R. F. Hall reads the report on Mills Home. On motion to 
adopt, the report is discussed by Bro. Hall and the General Manager, 
Bro. I. G. Greer, and the report is adopted. 

The Associational sermon is preached by Rev. S. A. Rhyne, Rev. 
R. F. Hall reading the Scriptures, Rev. 2:1-7, Rev. S. L. Morgan 
leading the prayer. Bro. Rhyne took as his text Rev. 2:4 and 5. 

After the benediction by Editor Farmer, on motion, the Associa- 
tion adjourned for lunch. 



10 FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



AFTERNOON 

Rev. J. W. Pearce conducted the devotional services, "Forward 
With Christ in Prayer for the World." 

On motion, the body proceeds to the election of officers for the 
ensuing year, resulting as follows: 

Moderator, Rev. J. E. Ayscue. 
Vice-Moderator, Rev. E. Norfleet Gardner. 

Secretary-Treasurer, J. A. Campbell. 

The Moderator calls for the reports on: State Missions, S. A. 
Rhyne; Home Missions, Mrs. Abbie Bonsteel; Promotion, E. N. Gard- 
ner; Foreign Missions, B. P. Morshbanks. This report not read. 

These reports were spoken to by Bro. Rhyne on State Missions, 
Mrs. Bonsteel on Home Missions, S, L. Morgan on Foreign Missions, 
E. N. Gardner on Every Member Canvass, after which the reports are 
adopted. 

The Moderator appoints C. W. Flowers, J. M. Byrd, Mrs. C. D. 
Bain, J. Winston Pearce and H. Y. Smith Committee on Nominations. 
S. A. Rhyne, R. F. Hall and H. G. Patterson are appointed Committee 
on Time, Place and Preachers for the next Association. 

On motion, Bro. Hugh Lattimer is invited to speak on the Relief 
and Annuity Board which he does. 

The Association adjourns until the evening session, with benedic- 
tion by Rev. W. E. Bond. 



EVENING SESSION 

The devotional exercises were conducted by Rev. J. Winston 
Pearce, "Forward With Christ in a Vision of the World." 

Miss Zula Rogers, President of the B. Y. P. U. for the Association, 
made report of the condition of the work and the subject was further 
discussed by: Mrs. George Noel, The Intermediates; Perry Thomas, 
the Eastern District; L. W. Mitchell, the Central District; with re- 
marks by Revs. R. E. Atkins, W. E. Bond and E. N. Gardner. Report 
adopted. 

Herbert B. Taylor read the report on Sunday Schools and ably 
discussed the subject. The report was adopted. Rev. R. E. Atkins 
made a motion that our churches undertake to build up their Sunday 
School membership to equal at least their church membership. 

Benediction by G. E. Motley. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING 

Moderator Ayscue in the chair. Prayer by E. N. Gardner. Bro, 
Pearce continues the devotional exercises by discussing "Forward 
With Christ in Serving the World." 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 11 



Visitors invited and invitation was accepted by Perry Morgan, 
Assistant to State Secretary; Rev. C. H. Cashwell, representing the 
Anti-Saloon League; Rev. C. A. Upchurch, representing the Biblical 
Recorder; Rev. H. W. Norris, Raleigh Aossciation; Rev. Jesse Mc- 
Carter, Raleigh Association; Dr. L. E. Freeman, Meredith College. 

Mrs. Paul Bradley's report on Woman's Work is read and after 
discussion by Rev. S. L. Morgan, on motion the report is adopted. 
The report on Hospitals is read by Mrs. W. M. Morgan, the report 
on Aged Members is read by Rev. R. E. Atkins, and report on Temp 
erance is read by B. F. McLeod. Dr. L. E. M. Freeman and Rev. 
C. H. Cashwell discussed the report on Temperance. 

An offering for the work of the Anti-Saloon League is taken, 
amounting to $11.27, which amount was turned over to Bro. Cashwell. 

After the benediction by Bro. Perry Morgan, the Association 
adjourns for dinner. 



AFTERNOON SESSION 



Bro. Pearce continues the devotional exercises by discussing, "For- 
ward With Christ in Planning for the World." 

Mrs. C. D. Bain reads the report on Christian Education. On 
motion to adopt, the report is discussed by Mrs. Bain, Dr. L. E. M. 
Freeman and J. A. Campbell. Report is adopted. 

Rev. E. N. Gardner reads the report on State of the Churches. The 
report was appreciated greatly by the body and they voted unani- 
mously to have the report put on file in the Minutes and one thou- 
sand copies of the report printed for distribution in the churches. 

The Association hears Bro. Perry Morgan with delight as he talks 
about the condition of the Kingdom Work. 

Mrs. J. G. Layton reads the report on Religious Literature and 
discusses the subject. 

Report on Obituaries not in hand. 

Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for next Association 
reports: 

Place — Holly Springs, near Broadway. 

Preacher — S. L. Morgan; alternate, L, L. Johnson. 

Time — November 1 and 2, 19 33. 

By rising vote hearty and sincere thanks are extended the Piney 
Grove Church and Community for the fine way in which they have 
entertained the delegates and visitors to this session. 

On motion, the Clerk is requested to extend to Bro. J. C. Clifford, 
our beloved former Moderator, our deep sense of loss in his being 
prevented from attendance upon this session of our Association on 
account of sickness. 



12 FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



The Committee on Appointments makes its report, which is ad- 
opted as follows for next year: 

State Missions — Paul Strickland. 
Home Missions — Mrs. W. E. Nichols. 

Foreign Missions — Mrs. E. N. Gardner. 

Orphanage — D. H. Senter. 
Christian Education — B. F. McLeod. 

Sunday Schools — Joe Currin. 

Aged Ministers — J. M. Byrd. 

B. Y. P. U. — A Lincoln Fulk. 

Religious Literature — Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks. 

Hospitals — Mrs. C. K. Smith. 

Law Enforcement — J. A. McLeod. 

Obituaries — F. D. Byrd. 

State of the Churches — E. N. Gardner. 
Sunday School Board — G. G. Page, W. M. Morgan, Mrs. C. D. Bain. 

Executive Board — J. A. Campbell, E. N. Gardner, J. F. Blackman, 
Mrs. Paul Bradley, Miss Zula Rogers. 

Chairman Promotion Committee — E. N. Gardner. 

On motion, the Association, after full and free discucssion, decides 
to hold its next Union meeting at Coats on Saturday before the fifth 
Sunday in January, 19 33. Pastor J. Winston Pearce and Prof. Owen 
Odum to prepare the program. 

There being no further business, on motion, the Association ad- 
journs to meet in 19 33 with Holly Springs. After singing "Blest Be 
the Tie That Binds," the benediction is pronounced and the body 
adjourns. 

JOHN E. AYSCUE, Moderator. 
J. A. CAMPBELL, Clerk. 



REPORT ON TIME, PLACE AND PREACHER 

Your Committee make the following recommendations: Associa- 
tion to meet at Holly Springs, near Broadway, November 1 and 2, 
19 33, and that Rev. S. L. Morgan preach the Associational Sermon; 
alternate, Rev. L. L. Johnson. 

R. F. HALL 
S. A. RHYNE, 

HENRY PATTERSON, Committee. 

Reports on Foreign Missions, Religious Literature and Temperance 

did not reach the Clerk in time to be inserted in the Minutes. — Clerk. 



REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 

"Home Missions, strictly speaking, is the effort of all the churches 
combined through a denominational agency to do the missionary work 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



that could not be done by any church alone, or by independent state 
agencies. It is that group of missionary and evangelistic tasks which, 
either because of their nature or their size and difficulty, can best 
be handled by a south-wide denominational agency." 

Geographically, our Home Mission work is confined to these states 
comprising our Southern Baptist Convention, Cuba and the Canal 
Zone. 

Economically, our Southland is one of the richest countries in 
the world. In fertility of soil and in climatic conditions, it is un- 
surpassed by any country in the world. The South produces 34 per 
cent of the nation's coal, 5 4 per cent of its zinc, 44 per cent of its 
lead, 98 per cent of its aluminum, and 100 per cent of its sulpher, 
besides other mineral products too numerous to mention. From 
Southern wells flows over half of the country's oil; from the forests 
is cut over half of the nation's lumber; in the fields grows almost 
all its cotton and from its trees flows all its turpentine. 

Racially, all this vast wealth is attracting capital and labor which 
bring racial, social, and industrial problems which can be handled 
only by our Home Mission Board if we would maintain our stand- 
ing as a Christian nation and retain the faith of our forebearers who 
have kept our own Southland free from non-Christian domination. 
Within our bounds there are 45,000,000 people, 20,000,000 of whom 
are unchurched. 5,000,000 foreigners, 2,000,000 Indians, 7,200,000 
mountaineers, 10,000,000 negroes, 500,000Jews, 40.000 deaf mutes, 
2,500,000 in Cuba and Panama that challenge us to show them Jesus. 

Religiously, Home Missions means the bringing of Christian in- 
fluences to bear on foreigners in our industrial centers; helping racial 
groups to realize the life in Christ; building up virile, vigorous 
churches in rural areas; developing a Christian community life in 
every town and city; creating a denominational consciousness and 
morale; strengthening denominational co-operation; fencing against 
the inroads of spiritual disintegration, and a Christian social order 
in the homeland. 

The methods used in Home Mission work are the same as those 
used on the foreign fields — teaching, preaching, healing. 

The departments of work include — work with foreigners, Indians, 
Negroes, deaf mutes, seamen at the ports, Jews, church extension, 
hospitals, schools of missions and general field work. 

Financially, the wealth of the Southland has been used for per- 
sonal gain and pleasure to the extent that Southern Baptists are 
greatly in debt to the Lord for the work He has commandded us 



14 FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



to do. "Go teach all nations" is His command. In these lean years 
spiritually, God has brought the world to our very doors. 
"He who saves his Homeland saves all 
And all things saved bless him. 
He whose Homeland is lost loses all 
And all things lost curse him." 

MRS. ABBIE B. BONSTEEU 



REPORT ON AGED MINISTERS 

This refers, of course, to those who are disabled and have no 
means of income and no means of support. They have nothing to 
hope or look forward to save the small amount that is given them 
by the Ministers' Relief Board, which is about ten dollars per month. 
Many of these have wives who have to share with them this small 
amount. There are more widows of ministers than men who are 
also dependent upon this agency for support. 

There were in our state last year, receiving aid from the Board, 
57 men and 6 widows. There were added 3; there were 12 who 
died, 13 were on waiting list. There was allocated to men $6,745.44; 
to widows $7,124.64. Received from North Carolina, $6,511.88, total 
amount of beneficiaries was $14,351.80. So we received considerably 
more than we gave. 

I wish to attach the following statement of the Relief and An- 
nuity Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, as a part of this 
report: 

The receipts of the Relief and Annuity Board from the churches 
have been insufficient for several years to pay the very moderate 
stipends promised to the aged ministers on the Relief Roll, and in 
order to avoid a material reduction in benefits the Board has drawn 
each year heavily upon its Relief Reserve. That Reserve which was 
a few years ago the formidable sum of $250,000.00 has been entirely 
exhausted; now the three sources of income that make possible the 
continuation of these payments are the gifts from the churches 
through the co-operative Program, designated gifts and earnings on 
the Relief Endowment. These three sourcs are not furnishing the 
necessary money to pay the benfits alrady promised for 1932. Shall 
our aged preachers be allowed to suffer more than they have suf- 
mered? Shall we reject new applicaitons and reduce the benefits 
that we are already paying? North Carolina Baptists can help to 
meet this situation. Will they concern themselves about it? 
Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT E. ATKINS, Committee. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 15 



REPORT ON B. Y. P. U. 

One of the greatest needs of our churches today is a transformed 
membership. Realizing this need among our young people, our B. Y. 
P. U. leaders adopted "Be Ye Transformed" for the South-wide key- 
note. Our State, Regional, Associational and local programs of the 
year centered around this topic. 

In April our beloved State Secretary, James A. Ivey, left us to 
become pastor of one of the Asheville churches. Since that time the 
responsibility of State leadership has fallen on Misses Mable Starnes 
and Winnie Rickett. Notwithstanding the decrease in the number of 
leaders, the work has moved on in a great way. 

In our local Association one could not wish for better co-operation 
and a finer spirit. The meetings have been well attended. When 
we look back upon the work of the year we see many things that 
could have been done that were left undone, yet we are grateful for 
the achievemnts that were made. Among a few things we might 
note are four Unions organized; 8 Unions reached the standard at 
least one quarter; 28 Study Courses held; 1 Associational-wide Train- 
ing Class; 1 Associational Convention; 9 District Rallies held with 
average attendance of 90: 5 Representatives at State Assembly at 
Rridgecrest and 20 at State Regional Convention. 

The Committee recommends the following goal for the year: 

New General Organizations, 3. 

New Senior Organizations, 7. 

New Intermediate Organizations, 4. 

New Junior Organizations, 4. 

Standard General Organizations, 1. 

Senior Organizations, 11. 

Intermediate Organizations, 4. 

Junior Organizations, 4. 

That every B. Y. P. U. co-operate in Every Member Canvass. 

That a Study course be held in every church where there is a 
B. Y. P. U. (Feb. 27th to March 3rd). 

All churches represented at State Regional Convention to be 
held in Dunn, March 17-18. 

Ten representatives at State Assembly at Ridgecrest. 

All B. Y. P. U.'s to make quarterly reports to Associational and 
State officers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ZULA ROGERS, Committee. 



REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

The Divine Orders: 

The authority of Heaven should be heeded by all the saved. A 
mandate from the King of all should be obeyed. God's mighty will 



16 FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



is expected to be executed. That last commandment of Christ obli- 
gates every church member. In the work of preaching, living and 
giving the Gospel of Christ for the unsaved in North Carolina. 
The Divine Organization: 

Is constituted of twice born souls who have been saved, united on 
God's word. The "State Mission Board" is Scriptural. It enables the 
strong to aid the weak and show the unselfish work of Christ. In 
this we have the coming together of all the churches of Christ for 
the whole state work. 
The Divine Effectiveness: 

The records of the past show how effective this work has been. 
In the souls that have been saved, the churches that have been estab- 
lished, the schools founded and kept and our great work of charity. 
In the present we see the struggling and marshalling of God's people 
against the apparition. The future calls for the enlightenment and 
enlistment of all the churches in the state of North Carolina. 

S. A. RHYNE, Committee. 



HOSPITAL REPORT 



The North Carolina Baptist Hospital is no longer an experiment. 
For nine years it has brought us the story of healing service in the field 
of social service, answering the call of North Carolina's sick and needy 
Baptist. And for these years it has never turned down a case whose 
application was properly endorsed by the Church and physician. 
Surely it bears the mark of Divine approval. 

The Hospital is doing as much free work now as it did the entire 
first year of its existence. The Baptist people should indeed be 
happy that they have been al)le to meet all these deinands thus far, 
and for the most part the patients have gone home happy and well. 

Approximaely 18,500 patients have been admitted since the hos- 
pital has been open. These sufferers came from every part of the 
state, afflicted with almost every sort of disease. Our missionaries, 
college students, ministers, their families, widows and orphans have 
gone and the hospital responded to their cry. By our co-operation 
and contributions we have made the Baptist Hospital a veritable life 
saving station for the suffering and dying of our state. 

The hospital needs more than ever before the support of Baptsit 
people who can pay for their care. The hospital offers advantages 
over smaller institutions, very low death rate, modern equipemnt, 
the fine medical staff and nursing force. Besides these advantages 
the wonderful spiritual atmosphere has a splendid effect in the 
healing and restoration to health. 

In 1931 the hospital cared for approximately 3,000 patients, more 
than half of these were charity or part pay patients. Even though 
the hospital is receiving less money it is doing thirty per cent more 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 17 



charity work. The work of caring for those who can not pay has 
grown from $5,000 to $60,000, and this year it will cost approximately 
$65,000. 

The hospital is now caring for about $5,000 worth of charity a 
month and they receive about $3,000 to carry this on. To meet this 
demand they are asking that the patient or the church pay one- 
third of the cost. If the people do not do this the hospital will be 
compelled to turn many away or go out of business. 

Let us plead with our Sunday Schools for a greater Mother's Day 
Offering. Fifteen hundred of our Sunday Schools have never given 
a cent for this great work. What a mighty source of revenue they 
would provide if they would join hands in this great business of 
healing. 

Let us go home and emphasize the importance of our churches' 
co-operating in this great work. Let us make larger contributions 
on Mother's Day. May we never fail to carry on the "Healing Sev- 
vice" that our Master gave His disciples nearly two thousand years 
ago. 

Respectively submitted, 

Wm. MORGAN. 



REPORT OF THE >nLLS HOME 

"Pure religion and undefiled before God and the Father is this, 
To visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and to keep 
himself unspotted from the world." James 1:27. 

The work of our Baptist Orphanage is a part of the great program 
of Jesus. "Jesus went about doing good," and He has promised to 
those "who shall give to drink unto one of these little ones a cup 
of cold water only — he shall in no wise lose his reward." Matt. 10:42. 
The best way we can honor God with our gifts is in the giving of 
money and personal service to human beings. Jesus said: "Inasmuch 
as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye 
have done it unto Me." Matt. 25:40. So we place the little child 
in the midst, the "fatherless and the widow" — with the full assurance 
that Jesus is standing by and looking on with divine approval. 

Under the date of June 4th, 1932, there was reported a total of 
632 children in our Orphanage, 496 in the Mills Home and 136 in 
the Kennedy Home. In addition, 298 children and 74 mothers are 
cared for in their own homes by Mothers Aid. Making a grand total 
of 9 30 children now in the care of our Orphanage. Besides this, the 
Orphanage has had the painful experience of turning down hundreds 
of cases during the year, cases that demand immediate attention, but 
the Orphanage was helpless to help for lack of sufficient funds. The 
painful experience has caused more anxious thought on the part of 
the management than the falling off of funds. 



18 FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

No serious camplaint can be brought against our faithful and 
loyal people for lack of sympathy and support. 'Tis true that con- 
tributions have fallen off, but not in proportion to the losses our 
people have sustained. Still it ought to be said that there are 
hundreds of Baptist Churches and Sunday Schools in North Carolina 
that have not given one penny for the support of our Orphanage 
during the entire year. This fact is almost unbelievable, and cer- 
tainly hard to understand. 

There is only one way to take care of our Orphanage work, and 
that is for every Baptist Sunday School in North Carolina to take an 
offering once per month during the entire year, and in addition a 
great Thanksgiving offering in November equivalent to one day's 
work or income. No politician has a better organization than we 
have for reaching every Baptist in North Carolina and getting a 
response for the Orphanage. There are two key men in every Bap- 
tist Church, the pastor and the Sunday School superintendent. An 
earnest appeal from each of these is about all that is necessary. Our 
people as a whole will respond if given an opportunity. 

Brethren, let us see to it that in all of our churches the needs 
of the Orphanage are cheerfully presented to our people once per 
month, and that a great Thanksgiving offering is taken in all of our 
churches in acknowledgement to Almighty God for His goodness and 
mercy and loving kindness which has followed us all the days of our 
lives. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. F. HALL. 



REPORT ON WOMAN'S WORK 

In the Little River Association the W. M. U. organizations number 
33, and the contributions amounted to $2,590.55 last year. There are 
probably more than 77 5 women and children taking an active part 
in the organized missionary work in our churches. 

Much work has been done; many souls have been saved, but the 
fields in our Association are still "white unto harvest." The un- 
enlisted women of the ten of our churches become a challenge. We 
must respond in a glorious way and see to it that the task of a 
society in every church is successfully accomplished. May we beg 
that every pastor join heart and hand with us in reaching our aim — 
a W. M. U. and its auxiliaries in every church and each of them 
working to glorify the Master. 

Plan big things for the coming year. Let all plans be built on 
these corner stones — Prayer, Service. Information and Stewardship. 

MRS. PAUL BRADLEY. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 19 

OUR SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

Our Sunday Schools have come a long way since that approximate 
beginning in England in 17 75, one hundred fifty-seven years ago. 

From that little gathering there has sprung what we today rec- 
ognize as a mighty school, modern in its appearance, graded in its 
ages, and teaching the one Book, the Holy Bible, throughout its 
entire organization. 

This mighty school is our Sunday School, and is the greatest 
institution of learning in the entire world. It rightly takes its place 
as the "feeder for the Church." It holds a large place of influence 
in the incoming tides of child life. It takes the children, not far 
from infancy, and begins the laying of the foundation of a life, en- 
abling it to have a fair chance in knowing how to serve God. This 
foundation is in the teaching of the Holy Bible. 

Should we not be proud that there is in existence such an organ- 
ization that shows to our children the teachings of Jesus Christ? 

For various reasons, this wonderful Book is not taught in the 
public schools, and it is in the Sunday School that every child has 
the equal rights of being taught the works and meanings of the life 
and teachings of Christ. 

Knowledge is a decided asset to every child. "Train up a child 
in the way he should go, and when he is old, he will not depart 
from it." Timothy had a Godly mother who taught him the Bible 
from childhood and when Paul found him at Lystra, he found in 
him a wealth of spiritual culture, and it was this study of the Bible 
that placed Timothy in such high standing among immortals. 

A church without care for the child is a monstrosity in the 
Kingdom of God. 

The Bible reveals the heart's needs of Christ and reveals Christ 
on its every page. Why shouldn't we of modern time praise God 
that we have Sunday Schools that enable one to read and learn of 
such wonderful teachings as are found only in the Bible? 

Tending towards raising the standards of our Sunday Schools, the 
Committee recommends the following: 

Better Sunday School Organizations. 

Better Sunday School records. 

Use of the best literature. 

An aggressive fight, not only to enlarge, but to get back to 
active attendance, those that have strayed away. 

^he use of more "Spiz-er-rink-tum." (Pep and liveliness). 

Consecrated teachers over our children. 

The committee fully believes that the above recommendations 
will enliven our Sunday Schools, will place them on a more secure 
foundation, and will give to our children a better opportunity in 
studying and learning the word of God. 

HERBERT B. TAYLOR. 



2 FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

REPORT OF PROMOTION COMMITTEE TO THE IjITTIjE RIVER 

ASSOCIATION MEETING AT PINY GROVE CHURCH, 

NOVEMBER 1 AND 2^ 1932. 

A year ago a South-wide movement was inaugurated among 
Southern Baptists to enlist through an Every Member Canvass the 
interest, prayers, gifts and service of the entire membership of the 
churches of the Southern Baptist Convention. This plan was not 
new to many hundreds of our churches. In this Association Angier, 
Buie's Creek, Chalybeate Springs and Dunn were following it as 
the most effective method discovered to enlist the support of their 
members. To the majority of our churches, however, it was a de- 
parture from old customs. 

Last year in the Little River Association fourteen churches put 
on the canvass. They were Angier, Antioch, Baptist Chapel, Broad- 
way, Buie's Creek, Chalybeate Springs, Coats, Cumberland Union, 
Dunn, Friendship, Holly Springs, Lillington, Neill's Creek and Swann's 
Station. The reports from these churches indicated the enlistment 
of a larger number of pledgers than usual. Throughout the year 
there has been fairly generally shown a rise in the spirit of giving, 
despite the crushing financial burdens under which many of our 
people have labored. In some cases the work of following up the 
canvass has been neglected, so that the movement has not won the 
enthusiastic place it holds in the hearts of many. This is not the 
fault of the canvass — it has been tested too long — but of the church 
leaders who have expected the canvass to run of its own accord, and 
have not done the important work of following up the pledging done 
last autumn. 

The prospects for the canvass in the Little River this month are 
bright. The Associational Training School at Buie's Creek, October 
17-21, was attended by an average of sixty people representing four- 
teen churches. The results seem to be as follows: First — a unity of 
spirit was developed among the representatives who came from the 
different churches. Then the recognition of a compelling, common 
task for Baptist people grew upon those in attendance night after 
night. Finally, there was generated an enthusiasm concerning this 
work, which sent out our people with the consciousness that they 
could and would do greater work for the Lord. 

Already fifteen promotion committees have been handed in for 
the local churches. It is expected that others will follow. We urge 
upon every church the desirability of holding local training school 
prior to the canvass, and upon the few churches that hesitate to 
attempt this a more careful study of the objectives of the canvass and 
a courageous attempt through it to advance the interests of the 
Kingdom. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. N. GARDNER. 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 21 

REPORT ON STATE OF THE CHURCHES OF THE LITTLE RIVER 

ASSOCIATION MEETING AT PINEY GROVE CHURCH, 

NOVEMBER 1 AND 2, 1932. 

The object of a report on state of the churches we take it is to 
set forth as definitely as possible the work of the churches during 
the year and the conditions existing in them. The method followed 
in securing- this report was a questionnaire sent out to the pastors, 
attendance of delegates upon the meetings fostered by the Association 
during the year, the Associational letter, and observations for which 
the writer alone must plead guilty. In this report no attempt at 
flattery is made, but an honest setting forth of a narrative which 
we pray may be used of the Lord in stirring our people to a more 
holy zeal for His Kingdom enterprises. 

We begin in the eastern district. Angier has had a change of 
pastors. W. H. Ford has been succeeded by L. E. M. Freeman, 
teacher of Bible at Meredith College. In both these pastors the 
church rightly considers it has been highly favored. It participates 
actively in the various enterprises of the denomination, and can be 
counted on almost always. 

Kennebec and Oak Grove are small churches numerically; but 
their earnest, progressive pastor, W. E. Bond, is leading them in a 
fine way. Oak Grove has been dormant, but gives promise of 
coming to life. Kennebec year after year shows a growing knowledge 
and efficiency. 

Coats reports large attendance upon its church services. Fifteen 
additions came as a result of the meeting conducted during the 
year. It has active Sunday School, B. Y. P. U. and missionary organi- 
zations; but notes little improvement in the spirit of missions during 
the year. The people are interested in the denominational causes. 
The pastor is J. Winston Pearce. 

The Erwin Church shows a remarkable growth undef the un- 
tiring efforts of its consecrated pastor, S. A. Rhyne. The problems 
of the cotton mills have been handled skillfully as they arose, and 
the church has grown in numbers and grace. It is one of two 
churches in the Association with a Sunday School enrollment larger 
than the church membership. The other is Kennebec. Erwin's gifts 
to missions, however, are out of proportion to the local contributions, 
about $1 for missions to $2 for the Erwin Church. 

The Dunn Church has continued its usual program during the 
year. The membership is larger than ever before, now reaching 
nearly six hundred. Many of these, although resident, are sadly 
indifferent; but scores are as patient and active in Christian work 
as can be found anywhere. Gifts to missions have declined disap- 
pointingly during the year; but the repair work on roof and interior 
decorating of the auditorium raised the total contributions to a 



2 2 FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



little more than they were a year ago. The various organizations 
aid in producing a unity of spirit and effort in the congregation. The 
happy pastor is E. Norfleet Gardner. 

J. A. Campbell, our beloved leader, reports a good year at Buie's 
Creek. Confessions are made frequently among the student body 
of Campbell College, an several additions have resulted to the 
church. More people are contributing to missions and local expenses 
than before. There is manifest a growing spirit of co-operation be_ 
tween the college group and the community at Buie's Creek. The 
community people frequently show fine evidence of their apprecia- 
tion of the young people attending the school. 

Chalybeate Springs under its progressive pastor, R. F. Hall, is 
constantly moving forward. Its organizations are helpful in the 
development of the church life. The people are responsive to appeals 
for service. A revival meeting resulted in a quickening of the life 
of the church. We point to a discrepancy in the proportion of gifts 
to missions and home expenses. More than $6 is spent at home for 
every $1 that goes outside. 

Piney Grove is our entertaining church. What fine entertain- 
ment they are showing us, tool No wonder among such people 
Pastor R. E. Atkins smiles. There have been twenty-two baptisms 
during the year. The chruch has several organizations, fairly active. 
The spirit of missions has hardly grown during the year. 

Baptist Grove and Rawles have had a pretty good year. There 
were two good meetings in these churches. No missionary organiza- 
tions are reported for either of the churches; but they do have Sun- 
day Schools and B. Y. P. U.'s G. N. Ashley is the pastor. 

Macedonia, formerly in the field with Baptist Grove and Rawles, 
now has as its pastor Gerald Motley, a zealous, consecrated student 
of Campbell College. The church had a fine revivar during the sum_ 
mer, and is looking forward to growth in many ways. 

Cumberland Union is a small church in the central district. Its 
pastor is Carl Ousley. It had a fine meeting during the summer, but 
has not reported how it is going to develop those brought into the 
church. 

Lillington has a new pastor, S. L. Morgan. It has in its member- 
ship many choice souls. They have Sunday School, B. Y. P. U. and 
W. M. S., which are actively functioning in the church. A revial 
meeting resulted in twenty-seven additions. The feeling prevails 
that the interest in missions is languid. 

It has seemed next to impossible to receive word from pastor or 
people of Bethel. There has been no attendance of the church at 
the various meetings during the year. No contributions for missions 
are indicated. 

L. L. Johnson reports a warmer fellowship among the churches 
of Antioch, Friendship and Neill's Creek. All of these have Sunday 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 23 

Schools, and Antioch and Friendship have B. Y. P. U.'s and W. M. S. 
The spirit of Missions is at a low ebb at Neill's Creek, while Friend- 
ship reported but |1 for missions to $11 for local expenses. A few 
of Antioch's representatives attend associational gatherings during 
the year; but the other two churches are rarely represented. 

Baptist Chapel, Broadway, Holly Springs and Swann's Station con- 
stitute a fine field in the western part of the Association. The people 
are happy in the pastor, J. E. Ayscue. There has been some growth 
during the year, notably at Holly Springs, which has organized a 
W. M. S. Broadway is making progress with its organizations. Baptist 
Chapel and Swann's Station have only a Sunday School. All four 
churches have great possibilities among the young people. 

Coiiclvisions : It is the opinion of the writer of this report that the 
following conditions exist in this Association: 

Good: First; There is usually a spirit of love and fellowship ex- 
isting between pastors and people in the Little River. 

Secondly; Proper emphasis is laid upon the importance of evangel- 
ism and the new birth. Almost every church has had a meeting, 
and many additions are reported, so that now our associational mem- 
bership is around 6,000. 

Thirdly; The organized work of the denomination, represented by 
Sunday Schools, missionary societies and B. Y. P. U.'s with the 
Every Member Canvass more recently enlisting our people, is gaining 
ground in our midst. 

Unsatisfactory: First; Practically one-third of our churches are 
not being represented in the various meetings for fellowship and 
instruction that occur in the Association between annual sessions of 
the body. These churches need to be enlisted in fellowship. 

Secondly; From all over the Association reports indicate that the 
missionary zeal of our people falls far short of what it ought to be. 
Pastors and leaders need to bestir themselves with unswerving deter- 
mination to acquaint their people with the full program of Jesus. 

Thirdly; There remain seven churches in our Association not yet 
committed to the work of the Every Member Canvass. We trust 
the wise leadership of these congregations may guide the people in 
accepting a greater responsibility in the work of the local church 
and the denomination at large. 

Calling upon our people everywhere to walk unitedly and steadily 
in the performance of our common task, we are, 
Yours respectfully, 

E. NORPLEET GARDNER, 
Chairman Executive Committee 



OBITUARIES 


ANGIER — 


ERWIN — 


Dr. E. E. Council 


Mrs. Mattie Averj- 


J. E. Montague 


Miss Alice Johnson 


ANTTOCH — 


FRIENDSHIP — 


Mrs. Essie C. Collins 
X. A. Yarborough 
Mrs. Rebecca Byrd 


W. J. Bethune 
Miss Uucy Johnson 


BAPTIST CHAPEI^ — 


HOLUY SPRINGS— 


John T. Thomas 


J. W. Buchanon 




Mrs. Mary A. Patterson 


BAPTIST GROVE — 


Mrs. Alberta Wicker 


I. C. Cain 




BUIE'S CREEK — 
Mrs. J. F. Gregory 


LILUINGTON — 
Mrs. A. Z. Hayes 


Jack Olive 


MACEDONIA — 


CHALYBEATE SPRINGS — 


Mrs. Margaret Smith 


W. N. Bradley 




Mrs. W. N. Bradley 


NEIUU'S CREEK — 


Mrs. Ruby Peede 


Archie Johnson 


Deacon R. H. Dewar 




CUMBERLAND UNION— 


OAK GROVE — 


J. E. Baker 


Nathan Hockaday 


COATS — 


PINEY GROVE— 


Mrs. A. M. Beasley ^^^^ ^^^^j^ ^ ^^^^^^ ■ 
Mrs. Mildred Pai*rish Turlington ^^ ^ mu^i. 1 


Hoke Stewart 




DUNN — 


SWANN'S STATION— 


Mrs. Moscoe Butler 


Deacon N. B. McNeill 


Mrs. Addle Jones 


Joe Thomas 



LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 25 

ANNUAL MEETING WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE 
LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



Chalybeate Springs Baptist Church, 
Thursday, August 25, 19 32. 

At 10:30 the meeting was opened with singing of hymn, "Jesus 
Shall Reign." The devotional was led by Mrs. J. R. Wells of Chaly- 
beate Springs using Rev. 7:9 as the basis for her remarks. 

Superintendent's report was then given and the keynote "Look 
unto the fields, for they are white already unto the harvest" was 
struck for the day's discussion. 

Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Coats, Young People's Leader, reported the 
organization of a G. A. at Angier and appealed to the organization to 
organize their young people. Coats G. A.'s had been quite active 
this year. 

Mrs. J. A. Buchanan, Mission Study Chairman, read her report 
which showed quite a bit of reading having been done in the Asso- 
ciation. Her suggestions on prayer were helpful. 

The roll call of societies followed, meeting with responses from 
all the Societies, except Friendship, telling of work done — of plans 
for the future and a hopefulness for greater things this year. 

Mrs. Edna R. Harris brought us a timely message, discussing 
"The Five Doors for All W. M. Workers to Keep Open." 

Special music — Miss Effie Pearson. 

Life in the Training School — Miss Elizabeth Draughon. 

Appointment of Committees 

Committee on Nominations — Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks, Mrs. E. N. 
Gardner, Mrs. C. E. Sorrell. 

Committee on Time and Place — Mrs. J. A. Buchanan, Mrs. O. D. 
Lyon, Mrs. D. D. Overby. 

Announcement of magazines on table for free distribution and 
report blanks were distributed. A gracious invitation to dinner was 
extended by Pastor R. F. Hall and Rev. E. N. Gardner was called on 
to dismiss us. 



AFTERNOON SERVICE 

Hymn — "Loyalty to Christ." 

Devotional — Mrs. J. R. Hood — John 17th was used in discussing 
"Prayer." 

Partners with God — at home and abroad was ably discussed by 
Rev. E. N. Gardner and Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks. There remaineth 
much of the land to be possessed and a call comes to each individual 
to give self first in order that we may yet possess the land. 



2 6 FIFTY-SIXTH AND FIFTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Special music — "The End of the Road" was rendered by Miss 
Ef f ie Pearson. 

Miss Mayone Spence, a returned missionary, feelingly gave us 
revealing glimpses into the Christian hearts of the people of Chile. 

Committees reported — The Nominating Committee's report was 
adopted as follows: 

Superintendent — Mrs. Paul Bradley, Kipling, N. C. 

Secretary — Mrs. V. L.. Stephens, Dunn. 

Young People's Leader — Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Coats. 

Assistant Young People's Leader — Mrs. W. E. Byers, Erwin. 

Personal Service Chairman — Miss Mattie Bain, Coats. 

Mission Study Chairman — Mrs. J. A. Buchanan, Broadway. 

Stewardship Chairman — Mrs. Abbie Bonsteel, Buie's Creek. 

Time and Place Committee reported the next meeting to be held 
with the Dunn Church, the last Thursday in August, 1933. Approved; 

Announcement of the Every Member Canvass in every church this 
fall was made and a study course was urged to be held in the- 
interest of a successful campaign. 

A rising vote of thanks was extended to the members of the 
entertaining church for the bountiful dinner served. Associational 
expenses were cared for. Minutes of the meeting were read and 
approved. Adjourned with prayer by Mr. R. F. Hall. 

MRS. PAUL BRADLEY, Superintendent. 
MRS. V. L. STEPHENS, Secretary. 



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HISTORICAL TABLE OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION 



Date and Place ol 
Meeting 



S751Cumberland Unior 

^76|Lilling-ton 

S77 1 Hector's Creek . 

S78 1 Juniper Spring's . 

S79 1 Friendship 

S80i Baptist Grove . . . 

S81|Holly Spring-s . . 

883 1 Hector's Creek . . 

8831Antioch 

884 [Cameron's Grove 

885|Neiirs Creek . . . . 

886] Juniper Springs . 

887|Piney Grove . . . . 

888|Friendship 

889iBaptist Grove . . 

SGOJAntioch 

SQlJBuie's Creek ... 

892 1 Holly Spring-s . . . 

893|Mount Tabor . . . 

894 1 Hector's Creek . . 

895 1 Friendship 

896!Dunn 

897|Junyper Spring's 

89 8 1 Cumberland Unioi 

899|New Hill 

900|Benson 

901|Friendghip 

902IDunn 

903|Piney Grove .... 

904 1 Holly Spring-s . . 

905|Cumberland Unior 

906|Lilling'ton 

907|Dunn 

908 1 Chalybeate Spring-; 

909|Antioch 

910 1 Baptist Grove . . . 

911|Coats 

.912 1 Juniper Spring-s . 

913|Lilling-ton 

.914|Piney Grove 

.915|Dunn, First 

L916|Chalybeate Spring-i 

L917|Antioch 

L918|Neiirs Creek . . . 
L919| Holly Spring-s . . 

L920|Coats 

L921 [Baptist Grove . . 

l923|Friendship 

L923|Swann's Station 

L9241Broadway 

L925|Piney Grove .... 

l926|Dunn 

l927|Chalybeate Spring-; 

1928 1 Angler 

l9291Antioch 

L930|Erwin 

L9311Friendship . . . 
1932|Piney Grove . . 



Moderator 



Elder 

Elder 

Elder 

Elder 

Elder 

Elder 

Elder 

Elder 

E'lder 

Elder 

Elder 

D. S. 

L. C. 

D. S. 

D. S. 

Elder 

Elder 

H. T. 

H. Y. 

H. Y. 

Elder 

J. C. 

J. C. 

Elder 

Elder 

Elder 

Elder 

Elder 

D. H. 
Elder 
Elder 
Elder 
Dr. C. 
L. H. 
L. H 
L. H. 
L. H. 

E. H. 
E. H. 
E. H. 
E. H. 
E. H. 
S. J. 



J. C. 
J. C. 



^J. C. 
J. C. 
J. C. 
J. C. 
J. c. 
J. c. 
J. c. 
J. c. 
J. E. 



Terrell Brooks. 
Terrell Brooks. 
Willi'am Brunt. 
Williiam Brunt. 
Willi'am Brunt. 
William Brunt. 
William Brunt. 
William Brunt. 
O. Churchill . . . 
H. W. Graham 
H. W. Graham 

Williams 

Ballentine .... 

Williams 

Williams 

J. M. Holleman 
J. M. Holleman 
Smith 
Smith 
Smith 
J. M. Holleman 
Clifford 
Clifford 
J. M. Holleman 
J. M. Holleman 
J. M. Holleman 
J. M. Holleman 
J. M. Holleman 
Senter . . . 
J. M. Holleman 
J. M. Holleman 
J. M. Holleman 
H. Norris 
Senter . . 

Senter . 

Senter . 

Senter . 
Ballentine 
Ballentine 
Ballentine 
Ballentine 
Ballentine 
Booker . . 
Cli'fford . 
Cli'fford . 
Cliifford . 
Cli'fford . 
Clifford . 
CMford . 
Cli-fford . 
Clifford . 
Clifford . 
Clifford . 
Cli'fford . 
Clifford . 
Clifford . 
CMford . 
Ayscue . . 



Clerk 



k. J. Kivett. . 
Sli Hilliard . . 
Eli Hilliard . . 
Eli Hilliard . . 
Eli Hilliard . . 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
r. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
I. A. Campbell 
I. A. Campbell 
T. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
7. A. Campbell 
T. A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
A. Campbell 
T. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
r. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell 
Campbell 
Campbell 
Campbell 
Campbell 
Campbell 
Campbell 
Campbell 



Introductory 
Sermon 



Missionary 
Sermon 



O o 



C to 
S to 





^ 


B 


pi 


^2 




0^ 


o g 


Xi S 


^S 



H. D. Judd 

Allen Betts 

A. N. Campbell . 
William Brunt . . 
A. N. Campbell . 
William Brunt . . 
O. Churchill .... 

C. S. Farris 

J. M. Holleman. . . 
H. W. Graham . . 
A. N. Campbell . 
Joseph Salmon . . 
Allen Betts 

A. N. Campbell . 

Allen Betts 

R. J. Bennett . . . 
J. M. Holleman . 
W. G. King . . . . 
J. M. HoF.eman. . 
Not Preached . . . 
J. M. Hollemian . 
R. W. Spi'llman . 
J. F. McDuffie . 
S. F. Conrad . . . . 
S. W. Oldham . . 

N. H. Gibbs 

G. A. Bain 

J. A. Campbell . . 
J. M. Holleman . 
C. V. Brooks . . . 
E. M. Lassiter . . 

B. Townsend .... 
Not Preached . . . 

B. Townsend .... 
J. A. Campbell . . 
G. T. Mills 

C. J. Thompson 
W. H. Edwards . . 
J. A. Campbell . . 
S. W. Oldham . . 
C. H. Norris .... 
J. A. Campbell . . 
J. S. Farmer .... 
C. H. Norris .... 
A. H. Porter .... 
W. Y. Quisenberry 
E. N. Johnson . . 

A. C. McCall 

E. N. Johnson . . . 
W. R. Beach .... 
J. E. Ayscue .... 
E. N. Johnson . . . 
T. Y. Seymour . . 

W. H. Ford 

R. F. Hall 

E. N. Gardner . . 
3. A. Rhyne .... 



). Churchill . . | 
H. D. Judd ... I 
William Brunt | 
A. N. Campbell I 
J. M. Holleman| 
A. N. Campbell 
H. W. Norris . 
J. M. Holleman 
A. N. Campbell 
W. M. Page . . 
C. W. Manly . . 
J. A. Campbell I 
C. Durham . . . 
J. A. Speitght . 
J. M. Holleman 
W. G. King . . . 
J. A. Campbell 
J. A. Campbell. 
W. G. King . . . 

A. N. Campbell I 
J. W. BlanchardI 
jJ. M. Holleman 
J. A. Campbell, 
J. P. Devenny. . 
J. A. Campbell. 
J. W. Suttle. . . i 
L. Johnson . . . j 
S. F. Conrad. . . 1 
H. C. Moore . . | 
W. B. Cullom . I 
L. Johnson. . . . | 
Dr. R. T. Vann. | 
Dr. W.R. Cullom I 
Dr. W.R. CullomI 

B. Townsend . . j 
L.E.M. Freeman I 
Dr. W.L. Pole at I 
James Long . . . | 
Frank Hare . . . | 
Dr. R. T. Vannj 
J. E. Lanier. . . | 
J. M. Holleman I 



|$-. 



10.001 

7.32| 

lO.OOJ 

14.311 

20.031 

17.13| 

13.371 

12.571 

6.46 

14.50 

11.02 

53.54i 

11.821 

9.20| 

11.46| 

9.64| 

25.251 

14.23i 

3.341 

9.64| 

8.64| 



1$ 

7.001 . 

48.13 

21.45] 

68.00 

39.35 

63.29 

57.19 

117.31 

60.98 

130.98 

47.22 

209.80 

264.97 

191.80 

276.92 

285.18 

233.69 

197.40 

228.31 

230.83 

261.90 



4.75| 

8.43| 

4.55| 

16.001 

58.67 

10.80 

9.45 

10.11 

25.53 

61.75 

26.66 

11.371 

36.101 

15.851 

11.801 



742 

815 

850 

895 

90S 

944 

1,183 

1,437 

1,447 

1,697 

1,664 

1,721 

1,837 

1,922 

1,871 

1,988 

2,106 

2,128 

2,189 

2,228 



15.22 
15.45 
25.33 
16.91 



253.65 

296.71 

389.66 

317.65 

438.63 

531.77 

646.04 

685.001 

702.441 

950.981 

987.571 

970.371 

330.151 

1020.201 

1022.871 

1036.141 

646.42 

701.39 

751.12 

914.61 

917.50 

1323.97 

1552.74 

1844.02 

868.91 

1133.23 

156.00 

359.76 

304.81 

345.31 



2,1831 

2,121 

2,226! 

2,310j 

2,440 

3,4921 

2,373 

2,436 

2,641 

2,782 

3,010 

3,893 

3,163 

3,237 

3,381 

3,435 

3,464 

3.756 

4,044 

4,157 

4,165 

4,475 

4,647 

4,955 

5,017 

5,098 

5,312 

5,53C 

5,524 

5,632 

5,60'; 

5,63'; 

5,938 

5,77] 

6.13£ 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Little River 
Baptist Association 

North Carolina 



FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

HELD WITH 

HOLLY SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 

NEAR BROADWAY, N. C. 

NOVEMBER 1 AND 2, 1933 • 



J. E. Ayscue, Moderator, Buie's Creek, N. C. 

E. N. Gardner, Vice-Moderator, - Dunn, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell, Clerk-Treasurer, Buie's Creek, N. C. 

R. F. Hall, Acting Clerk-Treasurer, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 



Next Annual Session Meets With Buie's Creek Baptist 
Church, October 31, November 1, 1934. 



To Preach The Associational Sermon, Rev. L. E. M. Freeman 
or His Alternate, Rev. R, E. Atkins. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

Little River 
Baptist Association 

North Carolina 



FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

HELD WITH 

HOLLY SPRINGS BAPTIST CHURCH 

NEAR BROADWAY, N. C. 

NOVEMBER 1 AND 2, 1933 

J. E. Ayscfue, Moderator, Buie's Creek, N. C. 

E. N. Gardner, Vice-Moderator, Dunn, N. C. 

J. A. Campbell, Clerk-Treasurer, Buie's Creek, N. C. 

R. F. Hall, Acting Clerk-Treastirer, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 



Next Annual Session Meets With Buie's Creek Baptist 
Church, October 31, November 1, 1934. 



To Preach The Associational Sermon, Rev, L. E. M. Freeman 
or His Alternate, Rev. R. E. Atkins. 



INDEX 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY— PAGE 

Officers - - 3 

Ordained Ministers - — 3 

Chairmen of Committees, 1934 — - - - - 4 

Executive Promotion Committee - - - 4 

Preceedings - ^ 

Delegates and Visitors - - 5 

Program Adopted 6 

REPORTS— 

Aged Ministers ...10 

B. Y. P. U - 18 

Christian Education — 16 

Foreign Missions -- .^ 8 

Hospitals — .- - . 10 

Mills Home -..11 

Obituaries .^ .- - 23 

Promotion Committee 16 

Religious Literature . ...... 9 

Resolutions 10, 22 

State Missions — ^- .13 

State of Churches ...- 19 

Sunday Schools ~.. 1 5 

Temperance „...12 

W. M. U 7 

Woman's Missionary Union, Proceedings 24 

Statistical Tables begin on „„ %1 

THE RECORD PU»LI«HIN« COMPANY. ZIBULON, NORTH CAROLINA 



MINUTES ■" ■■; ^' "~^" 

Of Th<s 

LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION f 

FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION 

Held With 

Holly Springs Baptist Church, nfcar Broadway, N. C, Not. 1-2» 1938 



J. E. Ayscue, Moderator, — _— -„. Buie's Creek 

E. N. Gardner, Vice- Moderator, ....- Dunn 

J. A. Campbell, Clerk-Treasurer, -.- „ Buie's Creek 

R. F. Hall, Acting Clerk-Treasurer, Fuquay Sprinff* 



Next Annual Session Meets With Buie's Creek Baptist Church 
Oct, 31, Nov. 1, 1934 



To preach the Associational Sermon, Rev. L. E. M. Freeman or hia 
alternate. Rev. R. E. Atkins 



ORDAINED MINISTERS AND PASTORS (1933) 

J. E. Ayscue ....- - - Buie's Creek 

J. D. Betts -- -- - .— Fuquay Springri 

W. E. Bond - - - Willow Spring* 

J. A. Campbell _ Buie's Creek 

C. E. Edwards ....„ _.. Buie's Creek 

L. E. M. Freeman Raleigh 

E. N. Gardner Dunn 

B. F. Mauldwin .- Raleigh 

S. L. Morgan . Raleigh 

S. A. Rhyne . -. ...... Erwin 

R, E. Tripp Buie's Creek 

R. E. Atkins — Raleigh 

R. F. Hall - _^ - - Fuquay Springs 

G. E. Motley _ — Fuquay Springs 

Carl Ousley Fuquay Springs 

J. Winston Pearce Wake Forest 

G. Scott Turner ..... , _.. Buie's Creek 

Otha Hilliard - Fuquay Spring* 

J. I. Memory _ _..^ Buie's Cr«ek 

3 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES FOR NEXT SESSION 

State Missions — - G. G. Page 

Home Missions -— - — — Mrs. J. A. Buchanan 

Foreign Missions Mrs. C. D. Bain 

Orphanage —. -— Rev. W. E. Bond 

Christian Education — - - Rev. R. E. Tripp 

Sunday Schools Rev. Otha Hilliard 

Aged Ministers — — . D. H. Senter 

B. Y. P. U. . Miss Annie Noel 

Religious Literature Mrs. E. N. Gardner 

Hospitals — - Mrs. J. G. Layton 

Law Erjforcement Paul Strickland 

Obituaries ._ _ W. E. Medlin 

State of Churches - Rev. S. A. Rhyne 



EXECUTIVE PROMOTION COMMITTEE APPOINTED AT 

MEETING OF LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION AT HOLLY 

SPRINGS NOVEMBER 2, 1933 

Moderator — Rev. J. E. Ayscue, Buie's Creek 

Vice-Moderator and Christian Promotion Committee.... 

Rev. E. Norfleet Gardner, Dunn 

Clerk — Rev. R. F. Hall, Fuquay Springs 

Angier — _ William Morgan, Angier 

Antioch — ,• ._. _ J. C. Bullock, Lillington, Route 3 

Baptist Chapel J. R. Howard, Jonesboro, RFD 

Baptist Grove — C. L. Mitchell, Fuquay Springs 

Bethel ....• J. A. West, Manchester 

Broadway W. M. Thomas, Broadway 

Buie's Creek • ._ J. F. Blackmon, Buie's Creek 

Chalybeate Springs — .— Early V/. Smith, Chalybeate Springs 

Coats .— Owen Odum, Coats 

Dunn J. A. McLeod, Dunn 

Erwin _ _.. L. Jackson, Er'win 

Friendship •.. Ernest Jones, Bunnlevel 

Holly Springs _... B. B. Wilson, Broadway, RFD 

Kennebec ^ Miss Avis Smith, Willow Springs 

Lillington ._.. Mrs. B. P. Gentry, Lillington 

Macedonia • _ ._. Ed. Holt, Holly Springs 

Neill's Creek Nathan Matthews, Angier 

Oak Grove -.... J. F. McLeod, Lillington, RFD 

Piney Grove _.- W. E. Medlin, Casma 

Pleasant Memory Melvin S. Denning, Coats 

Rawls . D. H. Senter , Chalybeate Springs 

Swann's Station • . D. A. Graham, Jonesboro, RFD 

To this list all pastors of the association. 

Members of Sunday School Board; G. G. Page, Mrs. C. D. Bain, 
Owen Odum. 



MINUTES OF THE IJ TTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



PROCEEDINGS 

The fifty-eighth annual session of the Little River Association met 
with the Holly Springs Baptist Church near Broadway, N. C, Nov. 
1, 1933. 

The meeting was called to order by the moderator, Rev. J. E. Ayscue. 
The congregation sang "All Hail The Power Of Jesus' Name," after 
which Rev. R. F. Hall of Fuquay Springs, conducted the devotional 
using as a theme, "The Supreme Mission of a Christian." 

The first order of business v/as the Roll Call of Churches, to 
which 18 of the 23 churches responded. The other 5 churches were 
enrolled later in the session. Visitors v/ere recognized; among them 
were Rev. T. H. King, Rev. W. R. Beach, Rev. J. A. McMillan, Rev. 
Frank Hare. 

Organization follovfed with the election of Rev. J. E. Ayscue, moder- 
ator, Rev. E. N. Gardner, Vice-Moderator, Rev. J, A. Campbell, Clerk- 
Treasurer, Rev. R. P. Hall, acting Clerk-Treasurer. 



DELEGATES AND VISITORS ENROLLED AS FOLLOWS: 

Angier — L. E. M. Freeman, Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Morgan, C. R. 
Carroll, J. L. Johnson, Mrs. A. L. Overby, Mrs. L. E. Johnson. 

Antioch — L. L. Johnson, Mrs. Beulah Gaddy, Lonnie McLean, Bessie 
Nordon, Mrs. Frank Brown, Lola O'Quinn, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. 
O'Quinn, W. W. McLean, Zenobia McLean, Henry Patterson, Alma 
Collins, Leth McLean, Rosa Brown. 

Baptist Chapel — J. M. Dickens, Mrs. Jarvis Dickens. 

Bethel— 

Buie's Creek— G. G. Page, C. E. Edwards, H. C. Ousley, Mrs. J. W. 
Holloway, G. Scott Turner, L. H. Campbell, J. W. HoUoway. 

Chalybeate Springs — Rev. and Mrs. R. F. Hall, Mrs. Paul Bradley, 
Mrs. Anna Smith, Mrs. J. F. Andrews, Mrs. D. H. Senter, G. R. 
Wells, Mrs. W. A. Mathews, Mrs. R. I. Latta, Mr. and Mrs. E. W. 
Smith, Mr. and Mrs. C. K. Simth, Mrs. B. G. Rambeaut. 

Coats— Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Mattie Bain. 

Cumberland Union— Carl Ousley, Mrs. J. S. Brown, A. M. Thomas, 
J. S. Brown. 

Baptist Grove — Tyree Senter, C. L. Mitchel. 

Broadway — J. E. Ayscue. 

Dunn — Rev. and Mrs. E. N. Gardner, Dr. and Mrs. C. D. Bain, Mrs. 
C. C. Upchurch, Mrs. W. T. Finch, Mrs. J. B. Lee, Mrs. C. L. Guy, 

5 



Minutes of the little river baptist association 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. McLeod, W. P. Dickey, Mrs. R. A. Duncan, 
Mrs. J. M. Morgan. 

Erwin— S. A. Rhyne, Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. 
Sessoms, A. H. Perry, J. H. McKee, W. F. Dawkins. 

Friendship — L. L. Johnson, M. L. Bethnne. 

Holly Springs — J. E. Ayseue, Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Patterson, J. A. 
Fattt€rson, Mrs. D. J. Patterson, Mrs. M. B. Patterson, Mr. and 
Mrs. G. K. Patterson, Mrs. H. B. Patterson, Bessie McNeil, Al- 
berta McNeil, Beulah McNeil, Gertie Lee McNeil, Leatie McNeil, 
Laura McNeil, Leva McNeil, Shirley Buchanan, Mrs. H. E. Buch- 
anan, J. S. McNeil, Hattie Norton. 

Kennebec— Otha Hilliard, M. T. Olive, W. 0. McLean. 

Lillington — S. L. Morgan. 

Macedonia — G. E. Motley, Verta Nash, Sadie Marshburn, J. E. Holt, 
Roy Weathers. 

Neil's Creek- 
Oak Grove — W. E. Bond, L. F. Matthews, Orman Marshburn, Julius 
Holloway. 

Piney Grove — Rev. and Mrs. R. E. Atkins, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Camp- 
bell, G. D. Campbell, W. E. Medlin, A. S. Austin, Mamie Austin, 
Mrs. J. D. Betts. 

Rawls— Otha Hilliard. 

Swann's Station — D. A. Graham. 

Pleasant Memory — J. I. Memory, Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Faulkner, Nellie 
Baird, M. S. Denning. 

The following program was adopted: 

LITTLE RIVEIR ASSOCL4TION 

HOLLY SPRINGS CHURCH, NOV. 1-2, 1933 

Wednesday 

10:00 a. m. _.„.. Worship, Rev. R. F. Hall 

10:20 • Organization; Recognition of Visitors, 

Appointment of Committees 

10:30 ..-. - Woman's Work, Mrs. Paul Bradley 

Mrs. J. A. Buchanan 

11:00 Foreign Missions, Mrs. E. N. Gardner 

11:30 •.... Religious Literature, Mrs. B. P. Marshbanka 

12:00 Sermon, Rev. S. L. Morgan 

6 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

DINNER 

1:45 p. m. „.^.— -• - Worship, Rev. L. L. Johnson 

2:00 Social Service: 

1. Aged Ministers — I. M. Byrd 

2. Hospitals ....• Mrs. C. K. Smith 

3. Mills Home - D. H. Senter 

I. G. Gre«.' 

4. Temperance _ ~ J. A. McL»od 

3:15 Address on Temperance, Rev, L. E. M. Freeman 

4:00 Adjournment 

7:30 p. m. — Worship, Carl Ousley 

7:45 _ -State Missions, Paul Strickland 

8:15 -.-„ Home Missions, Mrs. W. E. Nicholi 

M. A. Huggini 
Thursday 

10:00 a. m. _„ Worship, Rev. S. A. Rhyn« 

10:15 - •....- Sunday Schools, W. E. Medlin 

G. G. Page 

10:45 _ Christian Education, B. F. McLeod 

L. H. Campbell 

11:80 Promotion Campaign, Rev. E. N. Gardner 

General Discussion 
12:15 p. m. Miscellaneoug Busmes* 

DINNER 

1:30 ...-,-..- Worship, Gerald Motley 

1:46 .- B, Y. P. U., Miss Annie B. Noel 

Rev. J. Winston Pearce 

2:15 - - - Obituaries, F. D. Byrd 

2:30 -. „ -...„ State of the Churches, Rev. E. N. Gardner 

General Discussion 
3:00 Report of Committee; Miscellaneous. 

Chorister _ Henry Patterson 



REPORT OF W. M. U. WORK IN LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 

This report was read by Mrs. Paul Bradley, W. M. U. Superintend 
ent, of Little River Association, and ably discussed by Mrs. J. A. 
Buchanan. The report as follows was adopted. 

We are profoundly grateful to God for His many and wonderful 
blessmgs upon us as a W. M. U. during the past year. As it would b* 
difficult for a mother to enumei^ate the many things she does daily 
thi'ough her unselfish and loving service, so it i» difficult t» give tax 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

adequate report of the Woman's Work. It is impossible to measure 
spiritual values in material terms, yet in main it is a good report we 
bring you, a report of progress in most lines of work. We have more 
organizations, more members and more study classes than last year. 
Our offerings did not reach our aims, neither did our incomes. 

The W. M. U. realizes that if a person has a true missionary spirit 
the training must begin at an early age so we are making a special 
plea for all the auxiliaries of the W. M. U. Let's see that each boy 
and girl, as well as each woman, builds his year's work on prjayer, 
service, information and stewardship. 

May our work fort the coming year be done in such a glorious way 
that it may be said of us: "They have done what they could." 
Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. Paul Bradley. 



REPORT ON FOIREIGN MISSIONS 

Mrs. E. N. Gardner read the Report on Foreign Missions, after 
which Mrs. Gardner discussed the report very effectively, basing her 
remarks on a little book which she has recently written, "Christ In' 
The World." This book is used as a study course in the observance 
of the annual week of prayer for Foreign Missions, observed by the 
women of the South. 

(To the Little River Association, November 1, 1933.) 

Eighty-eight years five months ago the Southern Baptist Convention 
was organized for the purpose of "carrying into effect the benevolent 
intentions of our constituents by organizing a plan for eliciting, com- 
bining and directing the energies of the whole denomination in one 
sacred effort for the propagation of the Gospel"; and one of the two 
Boards formed for carrying out that plan was the Foreign Mission 
Board. In the report of the Board to the Convention last May, Execu- 
tive Secretary Chas. E. Maddry makes, among others, the following 
points : 

The income of the Board has diminished steadily for ten years, so 
that plans for carrying on the work, having already been drastically 
reduced, are for the year 1933-34 cut even more stringently. The 
support of native workers has been cut in half, a lack which devoted 
missionaries, appreciating the importance of the native work, are 
endeavoring to supply partially from) their own small salaries. Many 
missionary activities have been put entirely out of commission. The 
missionary force has been greatly reduced by keeping at home num- 
bers of missionaries who came on their regular furloughs; while 
others whose furloughs are r\ie are staying on at the risk of their 
health, afraid that if they once get home, we will keep them here. A 
great sum, which we would all like to see used more profitably, must 
be paid as interest on the debt; for the reduction of which all legacies 
and special gifts not otherwise designated are being used. Many 



MINUTES OF THE IJTTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATI DN 



missionaries have been erabled to return to their work by the aid of 
some individual or group of people who guarantee their passage 
money and their salaries until the next furlough. In this way some 
of the work has been saved and giome of the workers returned. 

In spite of these distressing conditions, God is abundantly blessing 
the efforts of those heroic souls who still carry on the world-mission 
enter-prise of Southern Baptists. Multitudes are pressing into the 
Kingdom in China, In Brazil and Africa, it is the same story. A rising 
tide of evangelism is sweeping over the fourteen mission fields, such 
as this generation of missionaries has not seen before. We have now 
I855I26 church members on our mssion fields, and had 17,284 baptisms 
last year. 

In the face of this magnificent opportunity and blessing on our mis- 
sion fields, of the shameful neglect of opportunity by the majority of 
Southern Baptists, and of the impossibility of making any further re- 
ductions without practically abandoning large portions of our work, 
your committee suggests : 

(1) That the Baptists composing the Association join heartily and 
conscientiously in the efforts of the Baptist, 100,000 Club to lift the 
load of debt from our Southern Baptist work; and (2) that we, as indi- 
vidual Christians and Southern Baptists, search our souls in regard 
to our stewardship of the Gospel to the whole World; and that we, as 
individuals and as an Association, renew our allegiance to our world- 
redeeming Christ, and go forward with him in telling the story of 
salvation to the ends of the earth. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. E. N. (Ruth C.) Gardner. 

Report adopted. 



REPOiRT ON RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

For some reason this report was not presented, however, Rev. W, 
R. Beach was present and presented the claims of the Biblical Re- 
corder. 

The hour having arrived for the annual sennon, Rev. S. L, Morgan 
came to the pulpit. The congregation sang, "Must Jesus Bear The 
Cross Alone?" Rev. S. A. Rhyne led in prayer. Bro. Morgan read a 
part of the 11th and 12th chapters of Hebrews,, using as a text He- 
brews 11:39-40, and preached an able sermon from this text. The 
congregation sang, "All Hail The Power Of Jesus' Name." Rev. R. E. 
Tripp pronounced the benediction. Adjourned for dinner. 



AFTERNOON SESSION 

Rev. T. H. King, of Clinton, N. C, conducted the devotional, reading 
from memory the 13th chapter of 1 Corinthians. 

The moderator appointed a committee, S. L, Morgan, Nealy Patter- 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

son, Otha Hilliard and H. C. Ousley, to examine the application of the 
Pleasant Memory Baptist Church for membership in the Little River 
Association. 

G. R. Wells offered a resolution instructing the clerk to send greet- 
ings to Rev. J. A. Campbell, and to express the regret of the Associ- 
ation that illness prevents his attendance. This was the first time in 
fifty-two years that Dr. Campbell had been absent. A fervent prayer 
in behalf of Dr. Campbell was offered by Rev. Frank Hare. 

The moderator appointed L. L. Johnson, G. R. Wells and Mrs. C. D. 
Bain as a Committee on Time, Place and Preacher, for next session. 



IREPORT ON AGED MINISTERS 

This report was not presented. R. F. Hall suggested that T. H. 
King, S. L. Morgan, and J. E. Ayscue use fifteen minutes in discuss- 
ing the claims of our aged ministers which they did with telling effect. 



REPORT ON HOSPITALS 

This report was read by Mrs, C. K. Smith and adopted, as follows: 

"Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, .... freely ye have received, free|" 
ly give." (Matthew 10-8.) Thus our Lord commanded us to care for 
the sick. Often in His busy ministry on earth He was eno'ugh con- 
cerned with the suffering or helplessness of others to restore them 
to health. Today we have the opportunity of doing in His name deeds 
of service to men and women who need the touch, skill and sympathy, 
as well as the prayers of workers who are devoted to this Christ. 

Such service for the sick is conducted at our State Baptist hospital 
at Winston-Salem, as well as at the hospitals in various other states 
of the South and at our Southern Baptist hospital in New Orleans. 
Let us briefly review the record of our own N. C. work. For ten 
years the hospital has stood to minister to the sick of our Denomina- 
tion, spending |250,000.00 for charicy, helping 10,000 persons. No one 
has been turned away. Rather than send the sick away without care, 
cur workers have borrowed money to maintain the work. The hos- 
pital is finely equipped, of fire-proof construction, and prepared to 
care for 100 patients per day. It has a splendid medical and surgical 
staff, efficient Christian nurses and a management that believes in 
prayer and love. Last year it eared for 2,967 patients. Over half of 
these were charity or part pay patients, costing $59,750.00 

Many of our churches have not responded to the appeals for this 
cause. Less than $11,000 was given Mother's Day to do $50,000.00 
worth of charity and save 2,000 needy sufferers. God forbid that we 
should let them continue to suffer or die for lack of funds. The 
churches who have failed should yet make an investment in life by 

10 



MINUTES OF THE TATTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



sending an offering for charity to the hospital. The churches are 
ui]ged to cooperate in saving these peoples by sending a dollar and a 
half to pay on each patient they send, as a supplement to the little 
received last Mother's Day. If our churches and communities who send 
patients will carry part of this responsibility, which is theirs, and help 
with their own patients we can care for them all and still save the 
credit of the hospital. We must not go into bankruptcy, so let every 
Baptist help carry the load. Do not overlook the hospital in your will. 
An endowment of |15,0G0.00 v/ill pay for one ward bed for all time 
and thus care for many sufferers. Can you make a greater contribu- 
tion to humanity than this? 

Mother's Day is the one time in the year our people are asked for 
contributions to this work. Let us not fail to give this matter full 
prominence at that time and send in a worthy offering. If the hospital 
continues to care for the Baptists sent by our churches it must have a 
larger support. We must have |2o,000.00 this year or turn away many 
who need help. Our hospital; our poor sick need our help. Let us da 
our best for them. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. C. R. Smith. 



REPORT ON MILLS HOME 

This report was prepared by D. H. Senter, and in his absence was 
read by the clerk. The report was discussed by Rev. J. A. McMillan of 
the Mills Home, Bro. McMillan made one of the best talks we have 
heard in a long time. R. F. Hall and W. P. Edwards also discussed the 
report. 

No other institution has such an appeal to our Baptist people as 
has the Mills Home. It is for what Mills Home stands, destitute child- 
hood. The nian or woman that is not interested in children is not nor- 
mal. The good this institution has done will never be revealed in this 
world. He who gives to help feed, clothe and educate helpless and 
needy children is laying up treasures in heaven as well as joy and 
happiness in this world. 

The Mills Home is doing a great work in Mothers' Aid, helping 
mothers to keep their children together, giving them a mother's love 
and home training. 

We again commend Mills Home to the love and generosity of our 
people. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. H. Senter, Committee. 
Report adopted. 

XX 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

REPORT ON, TEMPEIRANCE 

The Report on. Temperance was read by J. A. McLeod, and discuss- 
ed by Dr. L. E. M. Freeman. The report was adopted together with 

the following resolution: 

In view of the issue to be decided at the polls on November 7; Re- 
solved, that v/e recommend to the churches of our Association that 
Sunday, November 5, be observed as a day of prayer, v/here groups 
of people will be invited to meet for prayer in their church or in their 
homes at whatever hours may be found most practicable in behalf of 
temperance. 

IREPORT ON TEMPERANCE 

The temperance question has been nnic'h in evidence for the last 
year. The temperance people av/oke to find that the liquor forces had 
been continuously at Vv^ork and had worked up among the people a 
strong sentiment for the repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment to the 
Constitution of the United States. The last Congress submitted to the 
States for ratification by convention the proposed Twenty-First 
Amendment to the Constitution, which if ratified will repeal the 
Eighteenth Amendment. Thirty-three states have already voted, and 
every one for repeal. On November 7th six other states, including 
North Carolina, will vote on the question, and it appears at this time 
that practically every one of these six states will vote wet. We hope, 
however, that North Carolina will not vote for repeal and will show 
by its vote a sufficient dry sentiment to retain our state prohibition 
laws. 

All of us know the evil effects of alcoholic liquors and it is not 
necessary to discuss these effects in this report. We also know that 
more liquor was drunk prior to prohibition than since and that more 
v/ill be drunk after repeal of the prohibition laws than now; and it 
naturally follows that the more liquor our people drink the condition 
of our country is worse in the same ratio. We cannot drink ourselves 
into prosperity. Balancing the budget with money derived from liquor 
tax will cost too mUch in human souls. 

It appears at the present that' legalized sale of liquor will soon be 
in effect practically all over the nation; but we must believe that God 
will not long allow such conditions to continue, and we know that if 
every Christian will do his part He will speedily lead us out and into 
better conditions. May every one of us do his very best in this right- 
eous cause. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. A. McLeod. 

Mrs. C. D. Bain offered the closing prayer for the afternoon session. 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

WEDNESDAY NIGHT SESSION 

The Association met at 7:30. After song service, Rev. Carl Ousley 
led a devotional service, speaking on 'Taul as the Ma.ster Missionary." 
There was a large attendance. 



The Report on State Missions was read by H. Paul Strickland and 
discussed by Bro. Strickland and Rev. S. L. Morgan. 

REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 

The Baptists of North Carolina during the past year have many 
things to be proud of in the work which has been done by them for 
State Missions, when we consider the fact that the budget for this 
department of our work, as in every other department of our de- 
nominational work, has been greatly reduced, and that it has been 
necessary to operate with a balanced budget. It is only good business 
judgment that we should operate each department of our denomina- 
tional work with a balanced budget, but we must remember that we 
are now expending for State Missions only about one-third of what 
we were expending a few years ago for this same cause. It is also well 
to remember that we are what we are as a denomination because in 
the past we have pursued an aggressive program of State Missions. 
Our program now is aggressive but wholly inadequate. 

Some of the activities of the State Mission Board during the past 
year may be listed as follows : 

1 — The special evangelistic meetings in Eastern North Carolina 
under the direction of our State Mission Board. 

2 — The Sunday School and B. Y. P. U. revivals in the western sec- 
tion of North Carolina. 

The work done by our forty State Missionaries is very encouraging 
and they are to be complimented on what they have done for we should 
remember in 1930 we had 86 State Missionaries in comparison with, 
the forty which we now have. 

Special Evangelistic Meetings 

At the January meeting of the Board of Missions an appropriation 
of $2,100 was made for special evangelistic services in the eastern and 
western sections of North Carolina. It was deemed unwise to secure 
a full time person for this work and Rev. J. F. Han-is, pastor of the 
Beaufort Baptist church, was secured for part time worker for a few 
months. He made a survey of the field to be covered and arranged 
for meetings to be held, while the general secretary in the meantime 
called upon the pastors to volunteer their servicss for these meetings. 
The result of this work was great. 

X3 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Indian Work 

The missionaries to the Indians in North Carolina are Mr. and Mrs. 
M. C. Lunsford, who work in Robeson Co'unty and Mr. and Mrs. J. N. 
Lee of Swain; County. The amount expended for this work last year 
amounts to $1,686.00. The results of mission work among the Indians 
has been very encouraging. 

Stimulation WoVk Amang Negrbes 

There are 250,000 Negro Baptists in the state who work through 
four conferences. The work among the Negroes has been carried on 
as far as possible in cooperating with Shaw University. There was 
appropriated for the work $1,500.00 and M. W. William.s, a teacher 
at Shaw University, was employed during the summer months to 
direct the work among the Negroes. The majority of his Work was 
done in training and in trying to prepare leaders in the different 
churches in the state. 

The Work Among The Sick At Oteen 

The work among the sick at Oteen offers a peculiar appeal to the 
people of North Carolina because that great institution is located in 
the borders of our state. The Mission Board in the States of Georgia, 
Virginia, South Carolina and Alabama help support the work which is 
done at Oteen. The work in this institution is in charge of Wayne W. 
Williams, who is also pastor of the Baptist church at Oteen. Mr. 
Williams is a World War Veteran and has accomplished much good in 
his work among these men who were disabled on account of the 
World War. 

Division Of Sunday School And B. Y. P. U. 

I'he division of the Sunday School of the State Mission Board is in 
charge of Perry Morgan, who has performed a great service to the 
Baptists of North Carolina in this capacity. The division of B. Y. P. U. 
is in charge of Miss Winnie Rickett, who is doing a great service train- 
ing the young people. There will be separate reports of the work done 
by these two departments of the State Mission Board, so the work 
which has been done by them will not be included in this report. 

The Baptists of North Carolina have done a great work in State 
Missions and should be proud of what has been accomplished by their 
efforts, but they should renew their efforts for this great work and 
should be willing to give more of their time and money in order that 
the State Mission Board may be able to accomplish the greatest re- 
suits possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 
H. Paul Strickland. 

14 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

The report on Home Missions was read by Mrs. W. E. Nichols. 
(The clerk did not receive the report hence the omission from the 
minutes). 

State Secretary M. A. Hug-gins delivered a very illuminating ad- 
dress on the Co-operative Program which was enjoyed by all present. 

After prayer by Rev. C. E. Edwards the Association adjourned 
until 10:00 o'clock Thursday morning. 



THURSDAY MORNING SESSION 

Following a song service, devotional exercises "were conducted by 
Rev. S. A. Rhyne. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

This report was read by Bro. W. E. Medlin and discussed by Bro. 
G. G. Page. Bro. Page said that only one out of every six church mem- 
bers in the Little River Association attends Sunday School with any 
degree of regularity. He made a strong appeal for better attendance 
in our Sunday Schools. The report was also discussed by Mrs. C. D. 
Bain and Rev. R. F. Hall, and adopted. 

REPOIRT ON. SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

The Sunday School is the great university for all our people, many 
of w^hom have not and probably never will have the opportunity of at- 
tending a higher institution of learning or a Theological Seminary. 
It is the greatest institution in the world for getting the word of God 
into the hearts and minds of all the people. 

In these complex, dynamic, changing, mobile and swift moving days 
in which we live and which bring to us spiritual, personal, indlustrial, 
educational, economic, social and domestic problems our churches 
should seize upon the Sunday School in a mighty fashion to bring 
it to a state of educational and evangelistic efficiency that will help us 
to meet the religious emergency We face in ths country whch Will 
overwhelm us if not met adequately and wisely. 

In our association there are twenty two churches, and we are hap- 
py to say a Sunday School in every church. We have a combined mem- 
bership of about 3859 with average atendance of 2623. This shows a 
decrease of 846 members also decrease of 301 in average attendance. 
God has blessed the faitliful few, for out of this goodly number we 
notice that scores of souls have been led to Christ from the ranks 
of our Sunday Schools, as a whole in this gi'eat work of our Baptist 
Sunday Schools we find that about 40 percent of possibilities enrolled 
with only 60 per cent of those enrolled attending "with any degree of 
regularity. 

15 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

One can see, therefore, that we are f ai* from the objective of giving 
Bible instruction to all of our people. The church is the only institu- 
tion that is making a real effort to minister to the spiritual lives of 
the people. Religious iristructon now depends largely on the Sunday 
School. At present this Bible teaching agency is so important in the 
church's work that its loss would be irreparable. We urge, therefore, 
that all of the churches endeavor to increase the enrollment of their 
Sunday Schools. 

We urge also that liberal support be given our Sunday School work 
which is needed to safe-guard the life work of the churches, preserve 
our distinctive Baptist Doctrines, teach the Bible, train our people, 
enlist our men and women, counteract outside iss'ues and influences 
that threaten the life of many of the churches, to solidify the think- 
ing of our people, direct them towards one great uniform plan and 
program of work for the future and to unite them in Cj^'istian ser- 
vice. 

The state department of Sunday Schools is located at 200 Biblical 
Recorder Building, Raleigh, Pen'y Morgan is secretary and L. L. Mor- 
gan is field worker. The department is occupied with the task of en- 
larging our Sunday Schools, securing equipment, training officers, 
teachers and other workers, enlistment, evangelism, and building up 
the churches in denominational ministries and useful service. Pastors 
and superintendents are invited to correspond with the secretary re- 
garding any help the department can give such as providing speakers 
and conference leaders for convention and teachers for training 
classes. Free literature on all phases of Sunday School Work may be 
had upon request. The State Sunday School Department desires to 
serve the churches. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. E. Medlin. 



REPORT ON CRISTIAN EDUCATION 

This report was not presented but the subject was discussed by 
Prof. L. H. Campbelll, J. C. Clifford, S. L. Morgan, J, E. Ayscue, G. 
E. Motley. 



REPORT ON PROMOTION COMMITTEE 

Rev. E. N. Gardner read and discussed the report. Dr. C. D. Bain 
told how the Dunn Baptist Church enlisted its members. The report 
was further disciussed; by G. G. Page, Rev. S. L. Morgan, Rev. R. F. 
Hall, and Mrs. C. D. Bain. Report adopted as follows: 

The work of the promotion committee in the individual church is 
to encourage the members of the local congregation to participate 

16 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

in the activities fostered by the church: worship, individual service 
and gifts of money. We believe it a desr^ble thing to have pledges 
received for voluntary service from the members at the same time 
they make their gifts of money, and that a separate card may well 
be passed at that time. 

During the past year many of our churches participated in the Every 
Member Canvass. We trust that this year the number will report 
unanimously in favor of it. We suggest that the canvassing, or "en- 
rollment", be made at the churcfh some Sunday at the close of the 
preaching hour, by several teams of two each, who have previolisly 
been given lists of| certain members of the church, and ijistructed in 
the method of obtaining pledges. Those who are not present at that 
service ought to be interviewed by the members of the teams during 
the afternoon, and given an opoprtunity to indicate what they hope 
to do in advancing the work of their Lord during the year. This plan 
we commend heartily to every church in the association, and urge 
pastors and deacons to be unwilling to count their work well done 
until every member of the church has been canvassed, and an effort 
made to enlist everyone in the work of the church. 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. Norfleet Gardner, 

Chairman Promotion Committee 



Miscellaneous Business 

Rev. S. L. Morgan read the report of the Committee on the appli- 
cation of the Pleasant Memory Baptist Church for memberighip in 

the Little River Association- 

We, the undersigned committee appointed to consider the applica- 
tion of Pleasant Memory Baptist Church for membership in the Lit- 
tle River Baptist Association, have examined their church covenant 
and articles of faith and find them in harmony with Baptist doctrine 
and practice, and hereby recommend that the church be admitted into 
our fellowship of churches. 

S. L. Morgan. 

H. C. Ousley 

N. A. Patterson 

R. 0. Hilliard 

Committee. 

17 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Rev. J. I. Memory pastor of the Pleasant Memory Church told of 

the possibilities of gi'owth of this New Church. 

The report was adopted, and the right hand of fellowship was 
extended to the pastor and messangers present. A collection of $12.75 
was received for this new church. 

Prayer was offered by Rev. W. E. Bond in behalf of the pastor 

and members of the Pleasant Memory Church. 

Adjournment for dinner. 



THURSDAY AFTERNOON 

Rev. G. E. Motley conducted the devotional service, using as a 
theme "The Three Great Commands of Jesus. 'Come'— 'Tarry*— 'Go' ". 

REPORT ON B. Y. P. U. 

Bro W. B. Wilson read and discussed the B. Y. P. U. report. 

Report adopted. 

In our B. Y. P. U. department this year we hope to show progress 
in the work by strengthening some of the weak points pointed out 
to us by our most efficient retiring^ president, chiefly the educational 
work of our B. Y. P. U.'s in the Association. It is our endeavor with 
your aid to have fifty per cent of our unions standard in our Asso- 
ciation with some extension work or enlarging campaign carried on. 
For in this aim we culminate the spiritual development of the indi- 
vidual who must be 100 per cent lor B. Y. P. U. which embodies 
christian principles Clirist would have us live up to. In turn the or- 
ganizations will be 100 per cent for Christ. But how can our asso- 
ciation know of the work being done if reports do not come in? Our 
plea is to please send in your reports which require little time but 
are so necessary to the promotion of the work. 

Among some of the things accomplished during the past year are 
the following: 

Associational-wide Meetings Held — - 2 

Associational-wide Training Classes for Associational Officers 1 

Associational Executive Com. Meetings Held - 5 

Program Com. Meetings Held 4 

B. Y. P. U.'s Taking Study Course -- -- - - .-••-- 30 

B Y. P. U.'s A-1 For At Least One Quarter ..... - 6 

Sorry illness prevents my being with you today. 

Miss, Annie B. Noel 

18 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
REPORT ON STATE OF THE CHURCHES 

The report on "State of The Churches" was read by Rev. E. N. 
Gardner and discussed by G. G. Page, W. B. Wilson, Otha Hilliard, 
W. E. Bond, S. L. Morgan and L. H. Campbell. 

The Report was adopted. 

In the western part of the Little River Association are Baptist 
Chapel, Broadway, Holly Springs and Swann's Station, four churches 
composed of many noble Christians, forming what seems to be a logi- 
cal field of labor. The moderator of the association, J. E. Ayscue, has 
been pastor of all four} but during the year resigned the work at the 
last named. Holly Springs had a good meeting during the year, with 
twenty-three additions. It has active, cooperative Sunday School, B. 
Y. P. U. and W. M. U. that contribute to the spirit of unity and 
progress in the church. It is proving its fine spirit of hospitality in 
entertaining the association this week. The Sunday School at Baptist 
Chapel is doing a good work. The people of Broadway have had the 
misfortune to lose their* church building by fire during the year; but 
are resolutely setting to the task of erecting a new one. Swann's i% 
at present handicapped without a pastor. The missionary activity in 
all these churches is not what it ought to be. For the first nine months 
of 1933 the amount of money sent up by them for the Cooperative Pro- 
gram and the orphanage totaled only |51.86, which is a drop of almost 
30 per cent over the corresponding period last year. These gifts would 
make an average of seven cents per capita for the membership of 
the four churches, or less than the cost of a plug of tobacco for King- 
dom enterprises outside the local church during the present calendar 
year. It is hoped that the last quarter of 1933 will show a decided 
improvement in this respect. 

Another field of churches is composed of Antioch, Friendship and 
Neill's Creek. Antioch has grown some during the year. All of the 
churches have Sunday Schools. Antioch and Friendship have W, M. S.; 
and Antioch, G. A.s and B. Y. P. U.s. Neill's Creek for some years 
has been inactive and poorly organized. It has contributed nothing to 
missions this calendar year. Friendship reports no gifts. Antioch has 
sent $50.72 to the Cooperative Program. The pastor, L. L. Johnson, 
has resigned his work. His earnest spirit of consecration will be miss- 
ed by many as he returns to a former field in another part of the 
state. 

Lillington has been making progress during the year. As a result of 
a revival meeting there were forty-one additions. The different or- 
ganizations make for unity of spirit; and the various causes of the 
Kingdom are presented to the church. S. L. Morgan is pastor. 

19 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Bethel is a small church of seventy-two members, with a Sunday- 
School two-thirds as large. It seldom has representatives at asso- 
ciational gatherings. Last year it reported $76.39 contributed for local 
expenses, but not a penny for any missionary object. Its pastor is 
B. F. Mauldwin. 

Buie's Creek has had two meetings during the year, with sixty- 
five received for baptism and many rededications. The people seem 
united in an encouraging manner. The church has a W. M. S., Y. W. A., 
R, A., Sunbeam Band,, Sunday School, several B. Y. P. U.s and a B. 
S. U. in the college. The spirit of the people in the community in as- 
sisting in promoting the welfare of the college is delightful. We should 
like to see this church fall in with the accepted plan for financing the 
Mills Home by sending to it every month a contribution from the Sim- 
day School. The association learns with joy that its pastor, Dr. J. 
A. Campbell, for more than fifty years diligent clerk of this gathering, 
is recovering his strength, and looks foi*ward to his return to our 
midst. 

Cumberland Union has done some repair work on its building, and 
thereby added considerably to its effectiveness as an educational struc- 
ture. It entertained well the union meeting during the summer. In its 
membership are several noble Christians. No gifts are reported for 
the first nine months of this year. Carl Ousley is pastor. 

Macedonia has developed in missionary spirit during the year. A 
year ago it had reported nothing for missions at this time. This year 
its gifts for the Cooperative Program and the orphanage equal $8.40. 
The people are responding to the leadership of their pastor, Gerald 
E. Motley. 

G. N. Ashley comes from Salemburg to preach to Baptist Grove and 
Rawls. These churches report good Sunday Schools and B. Y. P. U.s 
The missionary powers of the church are not well enlisted. With a 
combined membership of 355 they reported for the first nine months 
$13.82 for the Cooperative Program and orphanage, or an average 
of less than four cents per person. 

R. F. Hall reports for Chalybeate Springs: "A fine spirit of unity 
and cooperation prevails in the entire membership as. far as I am able 
to see and we are slowly, but s'urely pressing on the upward way." 
Our observation of this excellent church convinces us that the report 
is correct. 

Kennebec and Oak Grove are small churches in the central part of 
our association. W. E. Bond is pastor of Oak Grove; and Otha Hilliard 
a new pastor at Kennebec. Kennebec has a Sunday School and W. M. 
S. Oak Grove reports the outstanding meeting of the associational 
year, with fifty-two additions, an increase of 66 2-3 per cent oVer 
its enrollment of a year ago. 

20 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Ang-ier forges ahead under the leadership of Dr. L. E. M. Freeman. 
It has three hundred members, a Sunday School two-thirds as large, 
one B. Y. P. U. with thirty members, and a fully graded W. M. U., 
with six organizations of one hundred members. Total gifts of the 
church equaled $1500 for the twelve months. 

Coats is well organized, and moves forward under the alert guid- 
ance of its youthful pastor, J. Winston Pearce, who during the past 
year has also been president of the North Carolina Baptist Student 
Union. It had a good meeting. Its contributions for missions have 
fallen off somev/hat during the past nine months. 

The Erwin church catches the spirit of its pastor, S. A. Rhyne, and 
advances with commendable steadiness and brotherly feeling. It has a 
good Sunday School and missionary organization; yet its contribu- 
tions to the Cooperative Program have fallen off surprisingly during 
the first three quarters of this year. With the improvement in textile 
conditions at the mills we predict that there will be a decided advance 
in the gifts of the people. , . . 

Dunn has a present membership of 616. It is pretty well organized, 
having a good Sunday School and W. M. S., and other organizations 
rather indifferent in quality. Gifts for outside causes reported for the 
first three quarters amcunt to $1463.80, which is a falling off from 
gifts for the corresponding period of last year. Many of the people are 
intensely loyal; a large number are cool in their attitude towards the 
church. The people are constantly heaping favors upon the pastor, 
E. Norfleet Gardner, and his family. 

A study of conditions in our association at this time suggests two 
or three conclusions. First, we need more resident pastors of churches 
grouped in fields. There are several of our smaller churches that might 
form compact, strong fields, if they would unite and call a man for 
full time. As it is, many of the pastors are engaged in other activi- 
ties that require more attention than the task of preaching and de- 
veloping the churches . 

The second conclusion is that we need to emphasize missions in 
the Little River Association. We used to have many anti-mission 
Baptists within these bounds in their own churches. The trouble today 
seems to be that when they deserted their churches, they came into 
what are supposed to be missionary churches, and brought with them 
their dangerous indifference towards a lost world, 

21 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Finally, ,as we go into the new year, let us walk unitedly, loving 
one another as bretheren, and seeking to the best of our ability to cor- 
rect our mistakes and shortcomings, as we press onward in the Lord's 
work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. Norfleet Gardner, Chairman. 



Rev. G. Scott Turner read the report of the nomination committee. 
The report was adopted. This report is found elsewhere in 
these minutes. 

Rev. E. N. Gardner was elected Chairman of the Executive-Pro- 
motion Committee. Other members of this Committee are found 
elsewhere in the minutes. 

The report of the Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for next 
annual session was read and adopted. This report is found elsewhere 
in the minutes. 

Rev. J. I. Memory offered a resolution expressing the sincere ap- 
preciation of the messengers and visitors of the Little River Associa- 
tion to the pastor and members of the Holly Springs Baptist Church 
for the splendid manner in which they entertained this session of our 
association. 

Rev. R. F. Hall expressed the appreciation of the association to Bro. 
Henry Patterson and his fine choir for the helpful and worshipful 
music rendered. 

On motion the association voted to ask Bro. Perry Morgan, State 
Sunday School Secretary, to arrange for simultaneous Sunday School 
enlargement campaign in the Little River Association. 

22 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

After singing ''Blest Be The Tie", the association adjourned to meet 
next year with the Buie's Creek Baptist Church, Oct 31-Nov. 1, 1934. 

Rev. J. I. Memory offered the closing prayer. 
J. E. Ayscue — Moderator 
R. F. Hall— Acting Clerk-Treasurer. 



OBITUARIES 



Angler 

Mrs. Martha Barbour 
Herbert Nordon 
Mrs. Tom Mouldin 

Antioch 

J. W. Thomas 
D. A. Collins 
S. A. Powell 

Baptist Grove 
Mrs. Annie Revels 

Buie's Creek 
J. D. Upchurch 
J. F. Kitchen 
U. B. O'Quinn 
S. A. Upchurch 
L. R. Parker 
Mrs. Z. T. Kivett 
Mrs. M. A. Reardon 

Chalybeate Springs 
Mrs. Ella Blaekward 
Mrs. Atlas A. Johnson 

Dunn 

L. F. Bailey 
Walter Bryant 
Mrs. M. B. Faircloth 
Henry D. Hood 
Mrs. R. S. Jernigan 



J. D. Pope 

Mrs. R. W. Pope 

P. W. Riddle 

Mrs. J. A. Taylor 
Erwin 

J. W. Parker 
Friendship 

W. R. Byrd 

Mrs. Alex Parker 
Hally Springs 

J. M. Sloan 

W. M. Womack 

A. J. Taylor 

Z. 0. Buchanan 

Mrs. Elizabeth Rogers 
Kennebec 

Percy L. Smith 
Lillington 

A. R. Wilder 
Macedonia 

Miss Veola Ashworth 
Piney Grove 

Miss Zola Mae Whittington 

Mrs. Harriet Hare 

Mrs. Sarah F. Hilliard 
Swann's Station 

J. H. Graham 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

AJ^NUAL MEETING OF THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
OF THE LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 



Duim Baptist Church 
August 31, 1933 

10:30 A. M. Hymn— "All Hail The Power of Jesus Name." 

The devotional was led by Mrs. E. N. Gardner. 

She used the four mountain top experiences, Sinai, Carmel, Hermon 
and Olivet — in which she portrayed the significance of each expe- 
rience in its relationship to human conduct throughout the succeeding 
generations. Prayer by Miss Mattie Bain. 

Greeting's from the local church, Mrs. J. A. McLeod. 

Response, Mrs. D. B. Andrews. 

Roll-call of churches and reports of societies. 

All societies were represented except Kennebec. The reports 
revealed many new organizations among- the young people as well as 
good work in Mission Study and Personal Service. Antioch was es- 
pecially commended for the work done in Mission Study 

Duet — "Jesus Calls Us" — Mesdames Caudell and Poplin, was ren- 
dered after Miss Mary Marshbanks gave an interesting story of the 
song and its author. 

Reports and Recommendations 

Mission Study Chairman, Absent, 

Personal Service Chairman, Absent 

Stewardship Chairman, Absent 

Young People's leader, Mrs. W. E. Nichols, read her report and 
laid upon the missionary societies the task of faithfully training the 
young people. We were reminded to keep in mind The Stewardship 
Contest, The G. A. House party sometime in the fall, The Y. W. A. 
Camp at Ridgecrest, Student Conference at Campbell College, Boys' 
Year, organize the boys to make missionary minded men. 

Suprintendent, Mrs. Paul Bradley, read her report and urged us to 
build on the four foundations of Prayer, Service, Study and Steward- 
ship in order to grov/ in spirit and christian graces for the Master. 

24 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Margaret Fund and The Fannie Heck memorial were discussed by 
Mrs. J. G. Layton. 

Duet, Mesdames Caudell and Poplin. 

Attention was called to our College Y. W. A. which had he€n over* 
looked in reporting. 

Mrs. J. S. Farmer was introduced by Mrs. Bradley, who spoke on 
"The Joy of Doing Woman's Missionary Work." Attention was call- 
ed to the sample copies of Missionary literature on table. 

Appintment of committees — Committee on nominations — Mesdames 
J. G. Layton, J. A. McLeod, Miss Mattie Bain, Committee on Time and 
Place — Mesdames, D. D, Overby, Beulah Gaddy, Walter Byrd. 

Recognition of Rev. E. N. Johnson, Mt. Olive. Recognition of E. K. 
Gardner who announced a mass meeting of Harnett County dry for- 
ces at Campbell College the following Sunday also the Regional 
meeting for Foreign Missions at Raleigh on Friday, Sept. 15. 

Mrs.C.D.Bain,President of local society, invited all delegate* to din- 
ner in basement of church. 

Benediction, Rev. E. N. Johnson. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Hymn— "Jesus Shall Reign." 

The devotional was led by Miss Esther Byrd who stressed the impor- 
tance of character building and read Matt. 6, 19-34 for reference. 

Prayer, Mrs. E. N. Johnson. 

Since the evening was given over to the Young People's work, Mrs. 
Nichols asked for reports on the Stewardship Contest. Angier, Dunn 
and Buie's Creek heartily commended it as a worthy enterprise. As- 
sociational contest winners were recognized. Counselors were also 
recognized and Mrs. J. G. Layton was asked to lead in prayer for 
them. 

Solo — Miss Martin. 

A tithing story by Bobby Kelly. 

A tithing story — Little Blue Box — Mary Lois Overby. 

The address of the afternoon was made by Miss Winnie Rickett, 
State Young People's Leader, on the timely subject of Prohibition. 
After this strong' appeal for the youth, a motion was made by Mrs. 
J. G. Layton that the Woman's Missionary Union go on record to use 
their influence and vote against the repeal of the 18th Amendment. 

25 



MINUTES OlF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Motion carried. Report of Committees — Nominating Committee ren- 
dered the following- report which was adopted: — 

Superintendent — Mrs. Paul Bradley, KipliJig. 

Secretary — Mrs. V. L. Stephens, Dunn. 

Chairman, Personal Service — Miss Linda O'Quinn. 

Mission Study — Mrs. E. N. Gardner, Dunn. 

Stewardship — Mrs. D. D. Overby, Angier. 

Young People's Leaders: Mrs. N. E. Nichols, Coats; Mrs.Beulah 
Gaddy. 

Time and place Committee report was heard and adopted. Angier — 
Last Thursday in August, 1934. 

A collection for the expenses of the association was taken and 
|9.26 was turned over to Supt. 

A vote of thanks was extended to the Dunn Society for entertain- 
ment. 

Minutes read and approved. 

Hymn— Blest be the Tie that Binds. 

Prayer — Mrs. C. D. Bain. 

Superintendent — Mrs. Paul Bradley. 

Secretary — Mrs. V. L. Stephens. 



26 



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MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



TABLE V— WOMAN'S 


WORK OF LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 


CHURCHES 


n 


93 

O 

u 


d 

o 

u 

a; 


n 

pi 

o 
u 

Of 


o » 






m 

u 

< 


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< 




c 

CO 




Is 


5i 


Angler 


1 


--! 1 


1 


....^..1 3i 16!._..___ 


18 


201 


. ... 54 


10 


21.85 


Antioch 


1 


li 1 


1 


1 11 5| 15| 12 


15 


14 


30 


86 


35 


86.25 


Broadway 


1 


11 1 




.....J 31 161 15 


15 






46 




44189 


Buie's Creek .. { 1 


.....1 1 




11 3r 271 ._-_.. 


18 


-- 


30 


75 


15 


347.33 


Chalybeate Sp 


1 






11 2 


36|..._- 






23 


59 


26 


130.47 


Coats 


1 


.... i 


1 


1 4 


20| -_.... 


15 


17 


17 


69 


17 


48.00 


Dunn 




„ 2 




i 1 4 


60 _....- 


40 


-- 


40 


130 


80 


664.13 


Erwin 


1 


-. 1 


1 


11 41 


24 ... 


15 


6 


34 


79 


4 


57.60 


Friendship ,.„ 
Holly Springs 


1 


1 




....! 2| 


20| 


17 






37 




25.00 


1 


.. 1 




--I 21 


22!.-.,.. 


16 


....-.' 


.„„- 


38 




34.18 


Lillington 




II 11 


401 










14 


134.50 


Piney Grove 




1 


1 11 3 


28! 16 


1 




24 


68 


30 


43.69 


Castleberry M 


----! 




- !-- 


--- 


-- 


,-.-_. 


..-. 




180.00 


TOTALS .... 


12 


3 


10 


4 


1 71 36 


324 


43 


169 


57 


188 


781|231i|1.817.89 



S2 



MINUTES 

OP THE 



Little River 

Baptist 
Association 

NORTH CAROLINA 



FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

HELD WITH THE 

BUIE'S CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 
Octaber 31-November 1, 1934 



OFFICERS OF ASSOCIATION 

E. N. Gardner, Moderator Dunn 

J. E. Ayscue, Vice Moderator Buie's Creek 

R. F. Hall, Clerk-Treasurer Fuquay Springs 



Next Annual Session Meets With 

DUNN BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 29-30, 1935 

To Preach the Associational Sermon: 

REV. CHAS. B. HOWARD 

Rev. Frank Hare, Alternate 



'■>'^m 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

NORTH CAROLINA 



FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION 

HELD WITH THE 

BUIE'S CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 
October 31-November 1, 1934 



Next Annual Session Meets With 

DUNN BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 29-30, 1935 

To Preach the Associational Sermon: 
REV. CHAS. B. HOWARD 
Rev. Frank Hare, Alternate 




DR. J. A. CAMPBELL 



DR. J. A. CAMPBELL 

Founder, Principal, President 

Buie's Creek Academy, and 

Campbell Junior College 

1862-1887—1926-1934 



1862 — January 13. Born to Rev. Archibald Neill Campbell and Mrs. 
Humy M. Campbell, Harnett County, N. C. 

1872 — Born again and baptized by his father. 

1880 — Graduated from Oakdale Academy, Chatham County. 

1880 — Began teaching in home district. 

1880 — Elected clerk of Little River Association which office he held 
54 years, until death. 

1885 — Matriculated in Wake Forest College. 

1886 — Ordained to Baptist ministry. 

1887 — January 5. Opened Buie's Creek Academy in one-room building 
which cost $350, located on the present site of Campbell Col- 
lege. He had 19 students and the snow was knee deep. 

1889 — Elected pastor of Spring Branch Baptist Church, serving 45 
years, until death. 

1890 — November. Married Miss Cornelia Pearson of Buie's Creek. 

1890-94— 1897-99— Superintendent of Harnett County Schools. 

1891-95— 1899-1934— Pastor Buie's Creek Church, 41 years. 

1911 — A.B., Wake Forest College, with two sons. 

1926— D.D., Wake Forest College. 

1926 — December 17. Buie's Creek Academy advanced to Campbell 
Junior College; first and only president until death. 

1934— March 18. Fell on sleep at 4:30 p.m., Pittman Hospital, Fay- 
etteville — heart ailment. 
March 20, 3 p.m. Funeral in college auditorium, the following 
ministers participating: Dr. Charles E. Maddry, Richmond, 
Va.; Rev. I. T. Newton, Chadbourn; Dr. J. R. Jester, Winston- 
Salem; Rev. Herman T. Stevens, Asheboro; Rev. E. N. Gard- 
ner, Dunn; Rev. J. Winston Pearce, Buie's Creek, and a lay- 
man. Dr. William Louis Poteat, president emeritus of Wak^ 
Forest College. 

Interment was made in Buie's Creek Cemetery. 

3 



INDEX 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY— Page 

B. T. U. Workers 7 

Chairmen of Committees (1935) 7 

Promotion-Executive Committee (1934-35) 6 

Memorial Service for Dr. J. A. Campbell 26 

Picture and Sketch of Life of Dr. J. A. Campbell 2,3 

Proposed Program 27 

PROCEEDINGS— 

Order of Business 9 

REPORTS— 

Aged Ministers 14 

B. T. U 18 

Christian Education 20 

Foreign Missions 13 

Home Missions 23 

Hospitals . 14 

Law Enforcement 15 

Mills Home 16 

Obituaries 24 

Religious Literature 12 

State of Churches 17 

State Missions 22 

Sunday Schools 21 

Time, Place and Preacher 24 

Woman's Work 13 

Statistical Tables (begin) 31 

W. M. U. Minutes 29 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 



PROMOTION-EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— 1934-35 

G. G. PAGE, Chairman 

Gardner, Rev. E. N., Moderator, Pastor Dunn 

Ayscue, Rev. J. E., Vice-Moderator, Pastor_„-. Buie's Creek 

Hall, Rev. R. F., Clerk-Treasurer, Pastor Fuquay Springs 

Booe, Rev. M. F., Pastor Lillington 

Bond, Rev. W. E., Pastor Willow Springs 

Freeman, Dr. L. E. M., Pastor Raleigh 

Mauldin, Rev. B. F., Pastor Raleigh 

Rhyne, Rev. S. A., Pastor Erwin 

Atkins, Rev. R. E., Pastor Raleigh 

Motley, Rev. G. E., Pastor Buie's Creek 

Ousley, Rev. Carl, Pastor Wake Forest 

Turner, G. Scott, Pastor Buie's Creek 

Milliard, Rev. Otha, Pastor Fuquay Springs 

Memory, Rev. J. I., Pastor Buie's Creek 

Howard, Rev. C. B., Pastor Buie's Creek 

Upchurch, Rev. H. C, Pastor Apex 



ANGIER Wm. Morgan, Angier 

ANTIOCH J. C. Bullock, Route 3, Lillington 

BAPTIST CHAPEL J. R. Howard, (Route) Jonesboro 

BAPTIST GROVE Aubrey Sexton, Fuquay Springs 

BETHEL J. A. West, (Route) Manchester 

BROADWAY W. M. Thomas, Broadway 

BUIE'S CREEK J. F. Blackmon, Buie's Creek 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS Early W. Smith, Varina 

COATS Owen Odum, Coats 

CUMBERLAND UNION 

DUNN Dr. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

ERWIN L. Jackson, Erwin 

FRIENDSHIP Ernest Jones, Bunnlevel 

HOLLY SPRINGS B. B. Wilson, R.F.D., Broadway 



MINUTES OF THE LIT TLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

KENNEBEC Miss Avis Smith, Willow Springs 

LlLLINGTON Mrs. J. G. Layton, Liilington 

MACEDONIA ____Ed Holt, Holly Springs 

HARMONY C. L. O'Brian, R. 1, Bunnlevel 

NEILL'S CREEK Nathan Mathews, Angier 

OAK GROVE Leland Mathews, R. 2, Angier 

PINEY GROVE W. E. Medlin, Casma 

PLEASANT MEMORY S. V. Spivey, R. 1, Lillington 

RAWLS D. H. Senter, Chalybeate Springs 

SWAN'S STATION D. A. Graham, R.F.D., Jonesboro 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES— 1935 

STATE MISSIONS W. M. Morgan, Angier 

HOME MISSIONS J. F. Sherman, Rawls 

FOREIGN MISSIONS,-. Dr. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

ORPHANAGE J. G. Layton, Harmony 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS W. M. Thomas, Broadway 

AGED MINISTERS H. Y. Smith, Holly Springs 

B: Y. P. U Miss Zula Rogers, Antioch 

RELIGIOUS LITERATURE C. L. Mitchell, Piney Grove 

HOSPITALS Miss Lillie Davis, Antioch 

LAW ENFORCEMENT Henderson Steele, Lillington 

OBITUARIES Miss Mattie Bain, Coats 

STATE OF CHURCHES Rev. M. F. Booe, Friendship 

GOSPEL MUSIC A. E. Lynch, Buie's Creek 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONS J. F. Blackmon, Buie's Creek 

PROMOTION G. G. Page, Buie's Creek 

SERMON Rev. Chas. B. Howard, Buie's Creek 

ALTERNATE Rev. Frank Hare, Jonesboro 

WOMAN'S WORK Rev. S. A. Rhyne, Erwin 

NAME AND ADDRESS OF ONE B. T. U. WORKER FROM 
EACH CHURCH IN ASSOCIATION 

ANTIOCH Zula Rogers, Mamers 

ANGIER Egeta Williams, Angier 

BAPTIST CHAPEL J. R. Howard, Jonesboro 

BAPTIST GROVE____ Veldon Sexton, Fuquay Springs 

7 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

BETHEL. ^_ G. A. Matthews, Manchester 

BROADWAY_^^_— .- Pearl Thomas, Broadway 

BUIE'S CREEK John Ousley, Buie's Creek 

CHALYBEATE SP'GS___Ophelia Matthews, Chalybeate Springs 

COATS Rosa Edwards, Coats 

CUMBERLAND UNION A. M. Thomas, Fuquay Springs 

DUNN Elizabeth Draughen, Dunn 

ERWIN A. R. Hall, Erwin 

FRIENDSHIP Francis Byrd Bunnievel 

HOLLY SPRINGS Waylon Wilson, Broadway 

KENNEBEC Avis Smith, Willow Springs 

LILLINGTON Mamie Haighwood, Lillington 

MACEDONIA Roy Weathers, Holly Springs 

NEILL'S CREEK Juanita Johnson 

OAK GROVE ^___M. S. Denning, Coats 

PINEY GROVE Ollie Smith, Fuquay Springs 

RAWLS Mary Alice Hilliard, Fuquay Springs 

SWANN'S STATION M. S. Godfrey, Jonesboro 

PLEASANT MEMORY Jock Memory, Buie's Creek 

HARMONY Ray O'Brian, Bunnievel 



PROCEEDINGS 



WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION 

The Fifty-ninth Annual Session of the Little River Baptist 
Association met with the Buie's Creek Baptist Church, October 
31, 1934. 

Rev. Chas. B. Howard conducted the devotional, using as a 
theme "Christ's Love and Sacrifice for His Church." Rev. R. F. 
Hall offered prayer. 

Words of welcome were spoken by Rev. J. E. Ayscue. The 
Clerk called the roll of churches and all the churches were rep- 
resented. 

Organization followed with the election of Rev. E. N. Gardner 
as Moderator, Rev. J. E. Ayscue, Vice Moderator, Rev. R. F. 
Hall, Clerk-Treasurer. 

The following program was adopted: 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

Wednesday Morning Session 

10:00. Song and Worship, Rev. Chas. B. Howard. 

10:15. Enrollment and Organization. 

10:25. Recognition of Visitors, Appointment of Committees. 

10:30. Religious Literature, Mrs. E. IST. Gardner. 

10:50. Woman's Work, Mrs. Paul Bradley. 
Address by Mrs. Chas. B. Howard. 

11:15. Foreign Missions, Mrs. C. D. Bain. 
Address by Dr. J. B. Hipps. 

Campbell College Quartet. 

11:45. Sermon by Dr. L. E. M. Freeman— College Auditorium. 
Alternate. Rev. R. E. Atkins. 

12:30. Announcements and Adjournment. 

9 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE EIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Afternoon Session 

1:45. Song and Worship, Truby Powell. 
2:00. Home Missions, Mrs. J. A. Buchanan. 
2:20. Social Service: 

(1) Aged Ministers, D. H. Senter. 

(2) Hospitals, Mrs. J. G. Layton. 

(3) Law Enforcement, Paul Strickland. 

(4) Mills Home, Rev. C. H. Norris. 
Address, Supt. I. G. Greer. 

3:30. State of Churches, Rev. S. A. Rhjme. 

One-minute report from each church on outstanding achieve- 
ment of past year. 

4:00. Adjournment. 

Night Session 

7:45. Song and Worship, Holly Springs Intermediates. 
8:00. KejTLote, ''Christ Must Reign in Our Home Life": 

(1) "The Meaning of Home," Erma Knight. 

(2) "Love, An Essential in a Real Christian Home," Billie 

Ruth Currin. 

(3) "Unselfishness, An Essential in a Real Christian 

Home," Geraldine Rosser. 

(4) "Reverence, An Essential in a Real Christian Home," 

Gerald Motley. 

(5) Musical Reading, Miss Mabel Smith. 

8:35. Address, "CrowTi Him Lord of All," Dr. J. B. Hipps. 
9:05. Song, "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name." 
9:10. Closing Prayer. 

Thursday Moniing Session 

10:00. Song and Worship, Rev. Gerald Motley. 

10:15. Business. 

10:20. Christian Education, Rev. Scott Turner. 

Campbell College Glee Club, Prof. A. E. Lynch. 
10:50. Sunday Schools, Rev. Otha Hilliard. 

Address by State Sunday School Secretary Perry Morgan. 
11:20. State Missions, G. G. Page. 

Address, Secretary Baptist State Convention, M. A. Huggins. 
12:00. Baptist Opportunity in Europe and Palestine, Rev. E. N. 

Gardner — College Auditorium. 
12:30. Announcements and Adjournment. 

10 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Afternoon Session 

1:45. Song and Worship, Rev. J. I. Memory. 

2:00. Final Business of the Session. 

2:15. Obituaries, W. E. Medlin. 

Campbell College Quartet — ''Jesus Savior Pilot Me." 

2:30. Memorial Address for Dr. J. A. Campbell— College Audi- 
torium. 

3:00. Closing Prayer, Rev. J. E. Ayscue. 

An application from the Harmony Baptist Church for mem- 
bership in the Association was presented by R. A. Bell, J. G. 
Layton, A. B. Hayes and C. L. O'Brian. A committee was ap- 
pointed to study the application of the Harmony Church and 
make recommendation to the Association. Members of commit- 
tee: Chas. B. Howard, L. E. M. Freeman, Mrs. W. E. Nicols, 
Walter Wilson, D. H. Senter. 

The committee made a favorable report and the new church 
was received into the Association. 



11 



REPORTS 

RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

This report was read by Mrs. E. N. Gardner and discussed by 
Mrs. Gardner and Rev. W. R. Beach. Report adopted. 

In our day no one can be an intellig-ent man or woman who does not 
read; no one can be an intelligent Christian who does not read for the 
nurture of his soul life and to expand his consciousness of the mean- 
ing- of Christianity in the world of today; no one can be an intelligent 
Southern Baptist who does not read our denominational literature and 
keep up with the onward march of Christ's Kingdom in the efforts of 
Southern Baptists. The curse of every group of Christ's people is the 
ignorant, careless members; "therefore are my people gone into cap- 
tivity, because of lack of knowledge." 

In a recent survey of his own state, the venerable editor of the Vir- 
ginia Religious Herald has endeavored to ascertain how many pastors, 
deacons and leading laymen are endeavoring to carry on their relig- 
ious work without the aid of that paper. His findings, if pondered, are 
startling; but it is to be wondered whether our North Carolina breth- 
ren — ^whether the members of the Little River Association — ^would 
make even so good a showing. Statistics are not available, but would 
it not be interesting to know how many churches in the Little River 
Association have not one subscriber to the Biblical Recorder? Do we 
have to guess that such churches would be the ones who are doing 
least to further the cause of Christ, at home and abroad? 

For efficiency in service and growth in Christian life, the first prac- 
tical need of every member of this Association is our State Baptist pa- 
per, the Biblical Recorder. Here we get the necessary detailed informa- 
tion concerning the different phases of our state work, and through the 
editorial page keep in touch with our brethren throughout the South 
and with what is going on in the World in its relation to our major 
enterprise. But this is not the only paper we need. Beside it in each 
home should be our denominational Kingdom Bulletin, Home and For- 
eign Fields. No Baptist who is interested in Christ's supreme concern — . 
the salvation of the world — can offord to be without this thrilling and 
wisely edited monthly report from the various battle fronts. 

Shall we not now resolve that in the coming year we will make our- 
selves better, richer, more potent, more fruitful Christians, by first 
subscribing to and reading our Biblical Recorder, second opening our 
eyes to the world vision through Home and Foreign Fields, and third, 
availing ourselves of some of the riches in religious literature await- 
ing us at cur Book Shop, ready to our hands, hearts and minds. 

Respectfully submitted, 
RUTH C. GARDNER (Mrs. E. N. G.) 

1? 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

WOMAN'S WORK 

Read by Mrs. Paul Bradley. Report adopted. 

The 1891 Minutes of the Little River Association carry an account 
of a three day meeting of the association. Nowhere am I able to find 
in that meeting any report of any organized work of the women. To- 
day we have twelve W. M. U.'s. These ate sponsoring thirty- s'eVen 
young people's organizations. There are about eleven hundred women, 
girls and boys in our association engaged in carrying out our Lord 
and Master's last command. — Go ye into all the world and preach the 
gospel to every creature. We have grown since 1891 and we hope that 
we may continue to do so. God has greatly blessed our efforts despite 
the fact that there have been many difficulties. There have been en- 
couragements that make us know that we are working in accord with 
God's plan for the spread of the Gospel. 

May we never become satisfied with our past achievements, but ever 
press onward and upward. Hundreds in Association aren't yet enlist- 
ed. Our big task is to enlist them. May we give Christ our best during 
the coming year and serve Him with gladness. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. PAUL BRADLEY 

FOREIGN MISSIONS 

Read by Mrs. C. D. Bain and discussed by Mrs. Bain and Dr. 
J. B. Hipps. 

Report adopted. Report not available for minutes. 

The annual sermon was preached by Dr. L. E. M. Freeman in 
the college auditorium. His subject was: 'The Program of 
Christ." 

Prayer was offered by Rev. E. W. Byerly of Bonlee, N. C. 
The Moderator appointed a committee on Time, Place and 
Preacher for next session of Association as follows: B. D. Wil- 
son, Mrs. Furman Andrews, D. V. Lee. 

Adjourn for dinner. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

Devotional conducted by Truby Powell, reading Psalm 46. 
Prayer by E. N. Gardner. 

13 



MINUTES OP THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

AGED MINISTERS 

This report was written by D. H. Senter and read by Clerk. 
Report adopted. 

It is the duty of the Baptist denomination to adequately provide for 
all old ministers who have given their lives to the work of the Lord 
and our Baptist cause. Our ministers should also provide for them- 
selves by insuring in our Baptist Relief and Annuity Board which 
is a safe and sane method to insure that they have support in their 
old age. It is the duty of the churches to help them in paying their 
dues to said board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. H. SENTER, Com. 

HOSPITALS 

Read by Mrs. J. G. Layton and discussed by Mrs. Layton. 
Report adopted. 

The Baptist Hospital was established to provide hospitalization un- 
der Christian auspices and influences. No one is denied admission for 
lack of funds. The official force is composed of Christian men and 
women who believe in prayer. Prayer service is held daily. 

Patients remark on the unusual spiritual atmosphere of the insti- 
tution. 

The main building, a substantial five story brick building, is located 
on a beautiful elevation in the western part of Winston Salem. Near- 
by is the Nurses' Home, a three story building of similar construction. 

The spacious grounds, the tree shaded park with the foothills of 
the mountains in the background provide a naturally lovely and rest- 
ful retreat. 

The hospital has a staff of sixty medical and surgical doctors. 
Specialists for any particular case may be called at a moments notice, 
day or night. The doctors rank among the best. The equipment in- 
cludes every modem convenience. Our hospital rates A-1. Forty-five 
nurses, consecrated young women, well-trained and organized, are 
ready to render cheerful and efficient service. 

During the eleven years the hospital has been in operation nearly 
27,000 patients have received treatment. 

Within the first six months of this year 1,472 patients were entered. 
Of these, 981 were full-pay patients; 355 were part-pay patients; 136 
were free patients. 

The cost of the hospital for caring for free cases during these six 
months "was |14,676.00. 

14 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

The hospital has to depend almost entirely upon the once-a-year 
Mother's Day contributions from the churches and Sunday Schools for 
funds with which to care for charity cases. 

Let us enlarge its scope of service by an increase in contributions 
and pray God's continued blessing on its ministry to both soul and 
body. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. J. G. LAYTON. 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Read by Paul Strickland and discussed by Mr. Strickland. 
Report adopted. 

The question of law enforcement is one which is so broad that time 
and space will not permit a very extensive discussion of this most im- 
portant subject. It will, therefore, be necessary to confine the discus- 
sion to only a few of the most important features of this subject, or 
those features should have a special appeal to all Christians, not only 
from the standpoint of being law abiding citizens but also from the 
standpoint of being a Christian. 

The Christian Sabbath 

The proper observance of the Christian Sabbath as a day of rest 
and worship is fundamental in Christian teaching and life. Christians 
ought not to need any sort of legislation to quicken their conscience 
concerning their obligation and privileges in the matter of Sabbath 
observance. Although it is sad to say that many professed Christians 
forget both their obligation by deserting God's House and desecrate 
the Sabbath Day by all manner of worldly and sinful engagements. 

The Gambling Mania 

Gambling is among one of the worst evils which we have to meet 
today as there appears to be a widespread uprising of the gambling 
spirit. The gambling mania is finding many forms of expressions. In 
several important states of our union measures have been passed 
which legalize lotteries as a regular source of revenue for the con- 
duct of the government. In our own State of North Carolina during 
the last session of our legislature a very persistent effort was made 
by certain groups to establish lotteries and to allow betting on horse 
races, and there was enough progress made in this direction that an 
act was passed to allow this form of gambling in certain parts of our 
state upon a vote of the people. I am hoping that the people of these 
communities will never vote to legalize such a thing in their section, 
for by so doing it will not only injure themselves by having such a 
thing take place in their community, but it will be much easier for 
this malady to spread to every section of our state. 

15 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Repeal Of The Eighteenth Amendment 

' The Eighteenth Amendment of the Constitution of the United- States 
has been repealed. The repeal became effective on December 5, 1933. 
The repeal of the Eighteenth. Amendment is a great backward step in 
economic, sanity and moral welfare legislation taken by a great peo- 
ple. It is impossible to forecast or even imagine the frightful evils 
that will result. They are already manifest on every hand. Every 
warning given by the opponents of repeal has already been vindicated; 
every promise and assurance given by the advocates of repeal has 
already been proved to be utterly false. 

Wild-cat stilling and bootlegging, which were supposed to disappear, 
show a steady increase and now the government, both Federal and 
State, is throwing up its hands before the bootlegger, making little 
serious effort to enforce the law or to bring him to trial, but proposing 
to deal with him by competition in the price of liquor. Drunkeness is 
everywhere increasing and the court dockets are already jammed with 
the ripening fruits of our reckless sowing. Industrial and highway ac- 
cidents are already mounting. Platform pledges and campaign promis- 
es against the return of the saloon are already forgotten and in many 
places the old-time saloon is back and doing it's deadly work. 

There will most likely be a determined effort during the coming 
legislature to repeal the Turlington Act and those people who wish to 
see this act repealed will use every means possible to secure its repeal. 
Th people of this state should rise up in arms against any effort to 
repeal the Turlington Act and should demand its more rigid enforce- 
ment and should do this by showing their willingness to support this 
law, and make it easier for the law enforcement officers to carry out 
their duties, for it is awfully hard to enforce the lavv' unless the of- 
ficers have the support of the people. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. PAUL STRICKLAND 



MILLS HOME 

Report read by Rev. C. H. Norris and discussed by Mr. Norris 
and Supt. I. G. Greer. Report adopted. 

"And the streets of the City shall be full of boys and girls playing 
in the streets thereof." Zech. 8:5. 

When Christ was in the world children had a large place in His 
heart. When He saves men He makes a large compassionate place in 
their hearts for orphans. This has been proven since our orphanage 
was founded by J. H. Mills a half a century 'ago. 

16 



MINUTES OF THE LITT LE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Th^ larger the place is made in our hearts for orphans by our sup- 
porting the Mills Home by our prayers, our love and o(ur financial 
gifts the more we are going to support God's world-wide program of 
all the kingdom work. At the Mills Home, Thomasville, and at' the 
Kennedy Memorial Home, Kinston, boys and girls are trained hand, 
head and heart. 

The Mothers' Aid keeps together worthy mothers and fatherless 
children. This serves a double purpose. It permits the sons and daugh- 
ters of widows to have the training of mother their best friend on 
earth and every child thus kept in the home with the mother makes 
a place at the Mills home for motherless children. 

Our orphanage is the eighth child of our denomination and does not 
come into the family of the Co-operative Program so this child must 
be supported by the once a month offering in our Baptist S. S. in N. 
C, by the Thanksgiving offering of one day's income or one day's 
labor and by other gifts. 

Let every Sunday School in the Little River Association take this 
monthly offering and make the largest Thanksgiving offering Nov. 
29, 1934, ever for this great cause. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. H. NORRIS. 

STATE OF CHURCHES 

Read by Rev. S. A. Rhyne and discussed by Mr. Rhyne and 
Mrs. E. N. Gardner. 

One-minute reports were given by members of the various 
churches in the Association. Those who spoke were as follows: 
Mr. Flowers for Angier; Truby Powell for Antioch; G. Motley 
for Baptist Grove; Professor Marshbanks for Buie's Creek; 
G. R. Wells for Chalybeate Springs; Mr. Odom for Coats; Mrs. 
Bain for Dunn; S. A. Rhyne for Erwin; Miss Esther Byrd for 
Friendship; B. B. Wilson for Holly Springs; C. H. Norris for 
Kennebec; Charles Howard for Lillington; G. Motley for Mace- 
donia; C. H. Norris for Neill's Creek; Jasper Memory for Pleas- 
ant Memory; D. A. Graham for Swann's Station; Joel Layton 
for Harmony. 

The time and state of the churches is not shown by the largeness 
of the buildings, by the number of her membership, by the amount of 
her contributions, nor by the attractiveness of the rendition of her 
services. What then is the measurement by which we may know the 
true state of the churches? 

17 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

It is the church's ability to unify herself with the will of God, ex- 
ecute the laws of Christ and submit to the control of the Holy Spirit 
in all her work. ....... 

What is the state of the twenty-three churches in the Little River 
Association by this measurement? Some are dead, some are dying, 
and the others are seriously sick. What is the cause of this death, 
this dying and this sickness in our churches? Four Groups are respon- 
sible. 

(1)— THE PASTORS— They are the shepherds of Christ and the 
distributors of the bread of life. Brother Pastors, is it because we are 
short in our working knov/ledge of God's word? Is it for the want of 
earnest prayer? It is for the lack of fellowship with Christ? Ours is 
a wonderful opportuity but gi-ave is our responsibility. 

(2) — THE DEACONS— Fullness is their new testament qualifica- 
tions. Full of faith, full of love, full of the spirit and full of good 
works. Sin and selfishness is outstanding in many of their lives. 

(3)— SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS— Their position is that of 
standing between the dead and the living with the bread of life. Many 
of them withhold this by what they say and do. 

(4)— CHURCH MEMBERS— They are the body of Christ. Fitting 
into and functioning for the whole body is the law of Christ for them. 
Yet many are failing in this divine organization thus making in- 
effective the work of Christ in the salvation of the lost. 

The remedy for Pastors, Deacons, Sunday School Officers, and 
Church Members is to find the will of God and faithfully perfonn the 
the work of Christ. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. A. RHYNE. 

The Moderator appointed the following Committee on Nomi- 
nations: J. F. Blackmon, Mrs. J. G. Layton, Otha Milliard. Their 
report is found elsewhere in minutes. 

Adjourned with prayer by H. R. Starling. 



WEDNESDAY NIGHT 

(See Order of Business) 

REPORT OF B. T. U. 

During the past year the name "Associational B. Y. P. U." was 
changed to "Associational B. T. U." (Baptist Training Union) to meet 
the demand for a more appropriate general name which would include 
the B. A. U.'s (Baptist Adult Unions) as well as the B. Y. P. U.'s. 
We hope that with the change in the term used in our Association 
during the coming year there will be the growth of a consciousness 

18 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



in our churches that the B. Y. P. U. and B. A. U. combined constitute 
a real church program for training Christians, young, and old, in all 
the duties and privileges of church membership, and consequently, 
the realization of the need of more A-1 B. A. U.'s, as well as B. Y. 
P. U.'s in our Association. 

Results of effort during the past year as follows, show that progress 
has been made in the work: 

Associational-Wide Meetings Held 3 

Executive Meetings Held 4 

District Rallies Held ^ 6 

Study Courses Conducted 15 

Number of B. Y. P. U.'s— 

Senior 7 

Intermediate 7 

Junior 7 

Adults 2 

Story Hour 4 

The fact that one of our greatest needs in the churches of our as- 
sociation is trained and consecrated leaders and the knowledge of that 
large number of talented, but untrained church members, unenlisted 
in the B. T. U., reveals the fact that we should devote our best efforts 
during the coming year to the promotion of B. T. U. work. We hope 
with your cooperation under His leadership to reach the following 
goal : 

1. Each church having a B. T. U. is to carry demonstration program 
into one church, at least once each quarter, that does not have a Union. 

2. Then set up organizations if possible. 

3. Have at least one study course in all unions. 

4. In each District have one Rally per quarter. 

5. Have at least 75 per cent of our B. T. U.'s standard by end of 
Associational Year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. A. POWELL. 



THURSDAY MORNING 

The devotional was conducted by Rev. Gerald Motley, using 
as a theme, "Supreme Love for Christ." 

Rev. R. F. Hall m.ade his report as treasurer of the Associa- 
tion. 

19 



MINUTES O F THIJ LITTLE JRlVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Total received from the churches for the assoeiational year ending 

November 1, 1934.— : — — . - — — .— 192.^7 

PAID OUT 

Printing Minutes $56.57 

Pleasant Memory Church 9.50 

Printing Programs 2.50 

Postage and Stationery 3.35 

Paid to Clerk-Treasurer 20.75 

TOTAL $92.67 

On motion the Association voted to pay the clerk $25 foi^ his 
services for the year 1935. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Read by Rev. Scott Turner and discussed by President Leslie 
Campbell. Report adopted. 

We are almost unanimously agreed on the value of education. But 
since the state provides an excellent opportunity for the education of 
every child, the expense for which we must all help to bear why should 
we assume the additional burden of Christian education through our 
denominational schools ? 

The first reason is that the spiritual side of man's life is the most 
important and the state cannot minister to this under present condi- 
tions. Yet, without spiritual development all other education is as chaff. 

A second reason is that the Christian School can train young people 
for definite Christian work. This also is outside the realm of the state. 
From our christian schools must ever come the majority of our pas- 
tors, missionaries, and special workers. 

A third reason is that there is actual danger of our young people's 
confidence in the "Faith of our Fathers", being destroyed by the 
modernistic and sometimes sceptical influences found in many State 
schools. We believe our young people may be trained in every sphere 
of modem education by men who still believe in God and revere the 
Scriptures. 

We would therefore recommend that the leaders of our denomina- 
tional schools and colleges ever remember that the development of 
Christian ideals is the primary reason for their existence and that the 
members of the churches forming this Association be urged to give 
loyal support to our schools both by their gifts and by sending their 
young people to them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. SCOTT TURNER. 

20 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

.. Report read by Rev. Otha Hilliard and adopted. 

At our last associational meeting Mr. G. G. Page, Mrs. C. D. Bain, 
and Mr. Owen Odum were appointed representatives of the Sunday 
School Board for the purpose of fostering the Sunday School work in 
the association. At the same time an invitation was extended to 
Secretary, Perry Morgan to conduct an association-wide Sunday School 
enlargement and revival campaign at his earliest convenience. He 
accepted and the campaign occurred May 27-June 3. All churches took 
part except Friendship, Macedonia, Cumberland Union and Erwin. 
Friendship, however, had a campaign of its own later. 

Calvary church in the Johnston Association, and Spring Branch, 
in the New South River, also took part with us in the campaign. 

Information gathered incident to the campaign reveals the follow- 
ing: 

1. Churches Cooperating 19 

2. Sunday School Enrollment at Start 3735 

3. Present in Sunday School that day 2130 

4. Present in S. S. at End of Campaign 3468 

(A gain of about 60 per cent.) 

While a gain of about 60 per cent was made, of those reached by 
our Sunday Schools, there are more than 5000 enrolled in no Sunday 
School who are looking to these 19 Baptist churches. Thus it will be 
seen that after all the progress we have made in the last year there 
are more than 60 per cent of our possibilities still unreached. 

It was also revealed that there are over 2500 souls above the age 
of accountability who make no profession of religion and are among 
our Baptist possibilities. 

The churches taking part in this revival campaign report in most 
cr-ses, a continuous growth in their attendance and increased improve- 
ment in work done. All these churches adopted the program of work 
set up by our Baptist Sunday School Board and are making some 
progress toward the accomplishment of its requirements. The Dunn, 
Lillington, Holly Springs, and Antioch churches are planning to build 
new Sunday School rooms in the near future. We are hoping that oth- 
er churches will follow the example set by these. 

Brother Page and his associates are striving to inaugurate fully 
the associational program set up by the Sunday School Board for as- 
sociation-wide promotion of our Sunday Schools. The churches have 
been divided into five groups for more effective work. When the 
organization is completed there will be a superintendent over each 
group to cooperate with all the churches in his group for the develop- 
ment of better Sunday Schools. 

21 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Your Committee wishes to recommend: 

1. That the work in the association be continued, 

2. That the same representatives be re-elected and authorized to 
complete the work they have begun, 

8. That ALL pastors, superintendents, and people co-operate with 
the associational officers in carrying forward this great Work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OTHA HILLIARD, Com. 

STATE MISSIONS 

Report was prepared by G. G. Page and read by the clerk. 

Our state mission program in North Carolina has gone forward in 
a splendid way during the past year in spite of the meager financial 
support we have given it. 

During the hundred years our state mission efforts have been func- 
tioning our Baptist host has increased from about seven thousand five 
hundred communicants to four hundred and forty thousand and the 
number of churches has grown to nearly 2,400. 

A very substantial per cent of the churches were constituted and 
fostered by the state mission program. Many of the strongest and 
most fruitful of our churches were once upon the suport of the mission 
board. 

At the present we have about fifty pastors serving 125 churches 
part of whose salaries are paid by the board. Some of these churches 
might have been self-supporting had not the depression so impoverish- 
ed their members. We are hoping for relief from some of these at an 
early date in order that the help of the board may be extended to other 
needy and destitute points. 

Rev. and Mrs. Lunsford are working among the Indians of Robeson 
county and Brother W. F. Sinclair among the Cherokee Indians. Rev. 
Wayne W. Williams is doing a fine work among the sick at Oteen 
hospital near Asheville. Part of his expenses comes from other states 
and North Carolina Baptists only share in this good cause. 

The Sunday School and B. Y. F. U. departments, operating under 
the State Mission program, are doing excellent work each of which 
will render separate report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. G. PAGE. 

22 



MINUTES OP THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

HOME MISSIONS 

This report was prepared by Mrs. James A. Buchanan and 
read by the clerk. 

Home Missions is the denomination as a v/hole taking the Gospel 
in all its fullness to the people within its bounds who have it not. Home 
Missions differ from Foreign Missions only in the conditions under 
which the "work is done; not at all in the message and very little in 
the method. 

What moves us to missions? Is our interest in foreigners real or 
imaginary? Is our mission enterprise based on a love for souls, or is 
it motivated by a sentiment that clusters around an institution ? These 
are not idle questions, for when we see people greatly moved by an 
appeal for the foreigners across the sea, but have little or no concern 
for the foreigners who live in their own neighborhood, we wonder if 
it is a passion for souls that moves them. If they do not love the for- 
eigner here whom they have seen, how can they love the foreigner in 
foreign lands whom they have not seen? 

For eighty-nine years the Home Mission Board has been working 
as an agency of the Southern Baptist Convention. Its purpose has been 
to create enthusiasm among our Baptist people for the salvation of 
the lost in the land w^here they live. It is still engaged in this task. 
How the churches gave to missions 1933. 

Total Cooperating Churches 24,270 

Churches giving nothing to missions & ben. — 8,342 
Churches Giving something to miss. & ben. — 15,928 
Churches giving through Co-op. Program only 1,970 

Churches giving designated objects only 5,407 

Churches giving both ways 8,551 

The statistics which I have given you appeared in the Southern Bap- 
tist Handbook, 1934. 

We thank God for our trials, for out of the crucible of affliction 
cometh patience, and from patience, experience, and from experience, 
wisdom. May Southern Baptists be wise in meeting the mission tasks 
in the homeland. God's Kingdom must come here if it would come in 
the World. We should only crave the privilege of helping to bring 
that Kingdom in. 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. JAMES A. BUCHANAN. 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

These reports were discussed by Rev. T. H. King of Clinton, 
who spoke on "Baptist Opportunity in North Carolina," and 
our State Mission Secretary, M. A. Huggins. Reports adopted. 

At noon the body retired to the college auditorium where 
they listened to an address by Rev. E. N. Gardner on "Baptist 
Opportunity in Europe and Palestine." The congregation sang 
"Jesus Saves," after which Rev. R. F. Hall offered the closing 
prayer. 

Adjourn for dinner. 



THURSDAY AFTERNOON 

The closing session was held in the college auditorium. Rev. 
J. I. Memory conducted the devotional services, reading John 
15:1-17. 

The Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for next session 
reported: 

PLACE— Dunn. 

TIME— October 29-31, 1935. 

PREACHER— Charles B. Howard. 

On motion the Association expressed their appreciation to the 
Rawls Church for the invitation to meet with them next year. 

Mrs. C. D. Bain announced the Southwide Sunday School 
Conference to be held in Raleigh, January 1-4, 1935. 

Rev. E. N. Gardner made an earnest appeal to all the churches 
in the Association to give loyal support to all four organiza- 
tions; to be more sacrificial in giving, and to pray for a deepen- 
ing of the spiritual life of all our people. He stated that he 
expected to visit all the churches in the Association in the near 
future. 

On motion by Rev. R. F. Hall, a rising vote of thanks was 
extended to the people of Buie's Creek for the splendid man- 
ner in which they entertained this session of the Association. 

REPORT ON OBITUARIES 

This report was furnished by W. E. Medlin and read by A. T. 
Howell and discussed by Rev. R. E. Atkins. 

24 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



OUR DEAD 


November 1, 1933, 


to October 31, 1934 


ANGIER 


FRIENDSHIP 


J. T. Nordan 


F. J. Bethune 


Perrin Pate 


M. L. Jones 


E. C. Mabry 


H. S. Byrd 


Mrs. Jessie Reeves 


HOLLY SPRINGS 




Mrs. Rena Holder 


ANTIOCH 


Mrs. J. Annie Thomas 


Mrs. Geanette I. O'Quinn 


Mrs. Orena Patterson 


M. A. Thomas 
N. A. S. McLean 


Mrs. Mary Patterson 
Mrs. B. Frances Patterson 


Mrs. Elizer Douglas 


E. Bryant Buchannan 


J. R. Patterson 


KENNEBEC 


Mrs. Christian Nordan 


W. H. Mills 


BAPTIST GROVE 


Miss Zola Marie Moore 


Mrs. Florence Campbell 


LILLINGTON 




J. R. Baggett, Sr. 


BETHEL 


MACEDONIA 


Mrs. Elizabeth Black 


D. H. Wheeler, Deacon 


BROADWAY 


J. M. Holt, Deacon 


S. H. Cox 


Mrs. Tecky Stephenson 




Mrs. Geneva Fields 


BUIE'S CREEK 


NEILS CREEK 


Dr. J. A. Campbell 


Mrs. Martha McLeod 


Mrs. F. F. Gregory 


Mrs. Lilly Johnson 


McDonald Marks 


Miss Laufa Johnson 


CHALYBEATE SPRINGS 


Miss Mollie Butts 


J. A. Hamilton 


OAK GROVE 


Mrs. G. R. Wells 


J. F. McLeod 


Mrs. Lucintha Andrews 


Mrs. Annie Cutts 


COATS 


Mrs. Daisy Crane 


Mrs. Salina Daniels 


PINEY GROVE 


J. M. Byrd 


Mrs. Emily Betts 


M. D. Denning 


A. C. Betts 


DUNN FIRST 


Mrs. Francis Austin 


Mrs. C. B. Aycock 


Mrs. C. A. Utley 


Frank Bailey, Sr. 


Mrs. Maggie Rogers 


J. F. Byrne, Deacon 


J. G. Spence 


J. A. Taylor, Deacon 


W. H. Horton 



?5 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Memorial Service for Dr. J. A. Campbell 

The 1934 session of the Little River Association was brought 
to a conclusion with a most impressive memorial service held 
for the late Dr. J. A. Campbell. The college quartet sang "Jesus 
Savior Pilot Me," arter which many glowing tributes were paid 
Dr. Campbell by the following: Rev. Frank Hare who said, "Dr. 
Campbell was a great and good man." Herbert Taylor spoke of 
Dr. Campbell on the streets of Dunn. Miss Gladys Strickland 
spoke of Dr. Campbell as pastor of Spring Branch for 44'/2 
years. She said, "He was a good shepherd. His heart was so big 
that he had room in it for all. He practiced what he preached." 
Prof. B. P. Marshbanks spoke of Dr. Campbell in the school 
room, and said, "He was a great co-worker. He had a great 
capacity for work. He loved his teachers and pupils and they 
all loved him." J. C. Clifford said, "Dr. Campbell was the best 
all-around man I ever knew. There will never be another man 
like him." Victor Lee, president of class of 1934, said, "Dr. 
Campbell meant more to me than any man I ever knew." The 
class of 1934 presented the college with a large portrait of Dr. 
Campbell. 

Many tears were noticed in the eyes of the large cx)ngregation 
as these glowing tributes were paid to Dr. J. A. Campbell. 

In reverence to his memory the congregation stood and sang 
as the closing hymn: "My Faith Looks Up to Thee." 

Rev. J .E. Ayscue offered the closing prayer. 



26 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
. PROPOSED PROGRAM 

•' Program of- progress" and development for the churches of the 
Little River Baptist Association,* adopted December 14, 1934, at 
Buie's Creek by the Promotion-Executive Committee, G. G. 
Page, Chairman.* 

SLOGAN: ''All Our People In AU Our Work." 

. I. ALL OUR ORGANIZATIONS ENLARGED AND 
; STRENGTHENED 

i.. Sunday Schoals; 

(a) Reaching, teaching and winning more people. 

(b) Enlisting and using more people. 

(c) Contributing to the orphanage monthly and at Thanksgiving. 
"(d) Observing the four "Special Days" each year. 

2. B. Y. P. U.: 

(a) Enlarge present organizations. 

(b) Set up new organizations where needed. 

(c) Enlist all church members in this training service. 

3. W. M. S. and Auxiliary Organizations: 

(a) Enlist more of our women in the study and support of 

missions. 

(b) Make continuous effort to interest the men in the study of 

missions. 

(c) Set up and foster functioning organizations in every church. 

(d) Encourage and foster all the auxihary organizations. 

II. SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT 

1. Evangelism: 

(a) Let evangelism be practiced in the homes. 

(h) Let the note of evangelism characterizs all our teaching and 
preaching in groups where unsaved people appear. 

(c) Let personal evangelism be practiced by Christians. 

(d) Let each church have at least one revival meeting each year. 

2. Enlistment: 

(a) Use more of our church members as teachers and leaders 
for their own development and to get more work done. 

(b) Foster a spirit of general co-operation in every congrega- 

tion and bring each member to feel that he has a part 
in all that his church is doing. 



MINtfTEg OF T HE LITfL^ RtVE]^ BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

in. A FINANCIAL PLAN 

ir Fix the budget* Let the church in conference decide just what ob-> 
jects it Will support financially and to what eactent. 

2. Let the church decide how it will proceed to raise the amount of 

money decided upon, whether through the ev^fy-member canvass 
or otherwise. But adopt a plan and work the plan. 

3. Disbursements. If the unified budget has been adopted let the re- 

ceipts be divided upon the percentage basis and each amount 
sent immediately to the party or agency for which it was col- 
lected. Do not hold moneys in the church treasuries to await 
accumulation before remitting. Our denomination pays a large 
amoimt of interest each year on money borrowed because our 
treasurers do not remit promptly. 

4. Encourage each church to co-operate with the financial plans of 

the denomination and let's all march full abreast. Let's pay our 
pastors and other local obligations as promptly as possible and 
support missions through the Co-operative Program, which is 
the only way we can all have a part in all our work. 



28 



ANNUAL MEETING OF 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 
Angier Baptist Church— Friday, August 31, 1934 



The meeting was called to order by Mrs. Paul Bradley, the 
superintendent. 

The devotional was led by Mrs. A. E. Lynch, who used as her 
subject, "Prayer in Christian Living." 

Welcome was extended by Mrs. L. Johnson and responded 
to by Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks. 

Roll call of Societies: Antioch, Angier, Buie's Creek, Chaly- 
beate Springs, Coats, Dunn, Erwin, Friendship, Holly Springs, 
Lillington and Piney Grove responding. 

Violin Solo — "Blessed Hour of Prayer," by Miss May Marsh- 
banks. 

Mrs. J. A. Walker spoke on "Jesus' Life and Example in 
Prayer and Personal Service." 

The superintendent urged in her report that everyone pray 
for the W. M. U. Specials. 

Solo — "Living for Jesus," by Mrs. A. L. Overby. Mrs. W. N. 
Jones, State W. M. U. President, gave a wonderful address on 
"Strength in Service." 

Committees appointed by superintendent: 

Nominating — Mesdames Durham Taylor, B. P. Marshbanks, 
D. H. Senter. 

Time and Place — Mesdames A. M. Shaw, G. W. O'Quinn, Miss 
Esther Byrd. 

Pastors King and Freeman recognized and then dismissed for 
lunch by Dr. Freeman. 

Afternoon Session 

Hymn — "Jesus Shall Reign." 

Devotional was led by Mrs. Beulah Gaddy, who based her re- 
marks on Luke 5:16. Prayer by Mrs. M. F. Booe. 

Mrs. W. E. Nichols gave her report and presented Misses 
Mildred Howard and Zona Bright Hockaday, stewardship con- 
test winners. 

29 



MINUTES OP THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Miss Mary Sue Nichols gave an account of the G. A. camp 
at Ridgecrest. 

Solo — Mrs. A. L. Overby. 

Mrs. D. D. Overby gave her report on Stewardship and urged 
everyone to be a steward always. 

Miss Billie Ruth Currin read an excellent paper on tithing. 

Playlet— "Why We Know What We Know," by the Angier 
Y. W. A., was very much enjoyed. 

Violin Solo — "Sweet Hour of Prayer," Miss May Marshbanks. 

A most helpful discussion on "Our Problems and Their Solu- 
tion" was led by Mrs. J. A. McLeod. 

After expressing thanks to the speakers for their co-operation 
the superintendent called for reports of committees: 

Nominating Committee reported for Superintendent, Mrs. 
Paul Bradley; Secretary, Mrs. V. L. Stephens; Leaders of Young 
People, Mrs. W. E. Nichols, Mrs. Beulah Gaddy; Mission Study 
Chairman, Mrs. E. N. Gardner; Stewardship Chairman, Mrs. 
D. D. Overby; Personal Service Chairman, Mrs. Charles B. 
Howard. 

Time and Place Committee: Piney Grove, last Friday in Au- 
gust. Both reports were adopted. 

Miss Mattie Bain called attention to associational expenses 
which was raised. 

A rising vote of thanks for their generous hospitality was 
extended to the Angier women. 

"Blest Be the Tie That Binds," followed by prayer by Dr. 
Freeman, sent us back to our homes with renewed strength and 
courage. 

MRS. PAUL BRADLEY, 

Superintendent. 

MRS. V. L. STEPHENS, 

Secretary. 



.30 






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.1 


.1 


.11.1 


.1 


.5 


.141.18 


..16 


..18 


..24 


..90 


..23 


...33.37 


2. Antioch 


.1 


.1 


.1 


.1 


.1 


.5 


.15 


.13 


..16 


..12 


..12 


.,i68 


..47 


...76.85 


3. Buie's Creek 


.1 


.1 


.1 


.1 


.1 


.5 


.40 


.30 


..28 


..17 


..45 


.160 


. . . . 
. . . . 


..237.03 


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.1 


.30 














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.3 


.15 


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.18 




..15 






..33 


..16 


...22.85 


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.2 


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.34 


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..87 


..52 


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..42II..14 


.234 


.113 


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9. Erwin 


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.1 


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.4 


.27 




..15 


..20 


..19 


..81 


..24 


...34.2® 


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.1 


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.5 


.21 


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..35 


..13 


..41 


.125 


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...76.04 


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.1 


.1 


.1 


.1 


.1 


.5 


.35 


.14 


...8 


...9 


..19 


..85 


..24 


.,190.50 


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.1 


.1 


.1 


.1 


.1 


.5 


.28 


.12 


..28 


...9 


I..31 


.108 


..34 


...31.34 


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..180.00 



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Church Printing A Specialty 



IV- 



MINUTES 

Of The 

SIXTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 

Little River 

Baptist 
Association 

North Carolina 



Held With 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, DUNN, N. C. 

October 29th, 1935 



The Next Annual Session Will Be Held With The 

Lillington Baptist Church, Lillington, N. C. 

October 27-28, 1936. 




MINUTES 

Of The 

SIXTIETH ANNUAL SESSION 

Little River 

Baptist 
Association 

North Carolina 



Held With 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, DUNN, N. G, 

October 29th, 1935 



The Next Annual Session Will Be Held With The 

Lillington Baptist Church, Lillington, N. C. 

October 27-28, 1936. 



H. C. Norris Will Preach The Annual Sermon. 



Printed by 

THE RECOBD PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Zebulon, N. C. 



INDEX 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY- 



Promotion Executive Committee '35-'36 3 

Chairmen of Committees 4 

Sunday School Organization ^ — ^^ 4 

B. T. U. Key Workers 4 

PROCEEDINGS BEGIN — 6 

MODERATOR'S MESSAGE 6 

REPORTS 



Law Enforcement — 9 

Religious Literature 10 

Cooperative Program 12 

State Missions/^ 13 

Home Missions — — -^ ^ —--i {/ 

Foreign Missions 15 

State Of Our Cfurches 16 

Woman's Work 17 

; Sunday Schools 19 

Christian Education 20 

Business — 22 

Orphanage 23 

Hospitals 24 

Promotion Committee 25 

Aged Ministers : — ^ — , 26 

Associational Missions -— 26 

Baptist Training Union 27 

Obituaries -^—Tti:-:rr-i*r- 28 

Our Home Goers 30 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 31 

STATISTICAL TABLES BEGIN ON - — 34 

HISTORICAL TABLE - — - — 38-39 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 

■-• ■' ■ 

PROMOTION-EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE— 1935-36 > 
Wm. MORGAN, Chairman, Angier 

Gardner, Rev. E. N., Moderator, Pastor ^^^Dunn 

Hall, Rev. R. F., Clerk-Treasurer, Pastor ._Fuquay SprMgs 

Ayscue, Rev. J. E., Pastor Biiie's Creek 

Bond, Rev. W. E., Pastor . Willow Springs 

Freeman, Dr. L. E. M., Pastor Raleigh 

Motley, Rev. G. E., Pastor Wake Forest 

Ousley, Rev. John, Pastor Wake Forest 

Turner, Rev. G. Scott, Pastor Erwin 

Milliard, Rev. Otha, Pastor Fuquay Springs 

Memory, Rev. J. I., Pastor Buie's Creek 

Howard, Rev. C. B., Pastor Buie's Creek 

Upchurch, Rev. H. C, Pastor Gary 

Norris, C. H., Pastor Wake Forest 

Poole, Wm., Pastor Fayetteville 

Hare, Frank, Pastor Jonesboro 

. 

ANGIER Dr. W. C. Byrd, Angier 

ANTIOCH J. C. Bullock, Route 3, Lillingtoii 

BAPTIST CHAPEL J. R. Howard, (Route) Joneshoro 

BAPTIST GROVE Aubrey Sexton, Fuquay Springs 

BETHEL J. A. West, (Route) Manchester 

iBUIE'S CREEK L. H. Campbell, Buie's Creek 

BROADWAY_____ W. M. Thomas, Broadway 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS Early W. Smith, Varina 

COATS _._____Owen Odum, Coats 

CUMBERLAND UNION A. M. Thomas, (Route) Varina 

DUNN C. D. Bain, Dunn 

ERWIN . L. Jackson.Erwin 

FRIENDSHIP Fred Hobbs, Bunnlevel 

HOLLY SPRINGS— B. B. Wilson, R.F.D.Broadway 

KENNEBEC J. H. Beasley, Willow Springs 

LILLINGTON__ _____Mrs. J:%. Layton, Lillington 

3 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

MACEDONIA Ed Holt, Holly Springs 

HARMONY C. L. O'Brian, R. I, Bunnlevel 

NEILL'S CREEK Nathan Matthews, Angier 

OAK GROVE Leland Mathews, R. 2, Angier 

PlififEY GROVE I. L. Howell, Varina 

PLEASANT MEMORY M. Denning( Route) Coats 

RAWLS D. H. Senter, Chalybeate Spring 

SWAN'S STATION E. C. Womack, R. F. D., Jonesboro 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES— 1936 

Aged Ministers J. G. Layton 

B. T. U Miss Mamie Haighwood 

Christian Education B. P. Marshbanks 

Foreign Missions Mrs. G. T. Noel 

Home Missions D. H. Senter 

Hospitals Dr. W. C. Byrd 

Temperance and Public Morals Paul Strickland 

Orphanage Mrs. C. D. Bain 

Obituaries Joe Bullock 

Religious Literature Miss Zula Rogers 

State Missions T. D. Byrd 

State of Churches C. B. Howard 

Sunday Schools G. G. Page 

Womans Work Mrs. E. N. Gardner 



ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL ORGANIZATION 

G. G. PAGE, Chairman 

OTHA HILLIARD, Vice-Chairman 

MISS MAMIE HAIGHWOOD, Secretary 

o 

B. T. U. KEY WORKERS and ADDRESS 
Atitioch Truby Powell Lillington 

Angier Egeta Williams Angier 

Baptist Chapel Margaret Thomas Broadway 

Baptist Grove Veldon Sexton Fuquay Spring^ 

Bethel Mrs. Susan Elmore Manchester 

Broadway Pearl Thomas Broadway 

4 ; 



: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Chalybeate Springs 

Coats 

Cumberland Union 

Dunn 

Erwin 

Friendship 

Holly Springs 

Kennebec. 

Lillington 

Macedonia 

Neil's Creek 

Oak Grove 

Piney Grove 

Rawls 

Swann's Station 

Pleasant Memory 

Harmony 

Buie's Creek 



Ophelia Mathews 
Rosa Edwards 
A. M. Thomas 
Pearl Faircloth 
A. R. Hall 
Francis Byrd 
Erma Knight 
Avis Smith 
Mamie Haighwood 
Roy Weathers 
Juanita Johnson 
M. S. Denning 
Ollie Smith 
Otha Hilliard 
Vivian Walker 
Jack Memory 
Aubrum Hayes 
Addie Prevatte 



Kipling 

Coats 

Fuquay Springs 

Dunn 

Erwin 

Bun n level 

Broadway 

Willow Springs 

Lillington 

Holly Springs 

Lillington 

Coats 

Fuquay Springs 

Fuquay Springs 

Jonesboro 

Coats 

Lillington 

Buie's Creek 



PROCEEDINGS 

TUESDAY MORNING SESSION 

The sixtieth annual session of the Little River Baptist 
Association convened with the First Baptist Church of Dunn, 
October 29, 1935. The Association met in connection with the 
fiftieth anniversary of the organization of the Dunn Baptist 
Church. 1885—1935. Many former pastors and friends of the 
Dunn church were in attendance, 

Prof. A. E. Lynch led in a service of song, and Rev. G. Scott 
Turner conducted the devotional, reading a part of first, second 
and fifth chapters of Ephesians. His theme being "The Church's 
I-ound^tion". Rev. I. T. Newton offered prayer. 

Organization followed with the election o? E. N. Gardner 
as Moderator, Charles B. Howard, Vice-Moderator, and R. F. 
Hall, Clerk-Treasurer. 

The moderator delivered a most helpful message. On mo- 
tion the moderator's mesage was to be printed in the minutes. 
It is as follows: 



MODERATOR S MESSAGE 

A year ago by your favor we became moderator of this 
body. It was not a coveted honor, but one that carried real re- 
sponsibilities, and led into different sections of the association, 
calling for wisdom greater than any we possessed in solving the 
problems of trying to lead in the work of the churches. 

At the outset we tried to get in touch with every church 
of the twenty-four of the group, discovering its need, and sug- 
gesting a program of action. Most of these were seen in the 
first months after the meeting of this body a year ago; and to 
some of them repeated visits were made. The others we met 
with later. Two, however, we failed to visit in an official way. 

Certain general conditions impress themselves upon us 
Most of them are favorable. There is a growing denominational 
consciousness among the people of our part 'of the state. It is 
not as intelligent as it ought to be; nor does it manifest itself 
in the steady loyalty of service we should like to see; but it is 

i 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



visible just the same. Closely connected with this is the recog- 
nition of definite responsibility on the part of the churches and 
the individuals who comprise them to accept certain undertakings 
as their share in the development of the life of the Kingdom. This 
has shown itself in the regular representation of a large num- 
ber of the churches at the quarterly meetings of the Executive- 
Promotion Committee of the association, in the interest demon- 
strated on visits to local churches, and in the outside contacts 
with various members of our body. Most encouraging of; all, 
however, has been the evidence of a real love of the Lord on the 
part of numbers of devoted disciples. For these indications ;we 
rejoice in spirit, and give thanks to God. ^i i- i.: 

On the other hand, there have been three or four uncie- 
sirable observations that have come to our attention. In some of 
the churches lax moral conditions have been reported, reflecting 
on the teachings of the Word of God, showing poor disciplinary 
powers, and discounting the influence of the Christian, bodyi^a- 
mong those of the world. A second discouraging factor has 
been the restlessness that has existed among several churches 
v/ith reference to pastors. The annual call, which has several 
objectionable features, has given rise to questions concerning. 1;he 
popularity of a preacher, the possibility of getting another who 
may draw a larger audience from the pleasure-loving group, an 
unconsidered desire for a change, without giving due thoughtto 
the prophetic, rather than entertaining, message of the minister, 
and to the fact that he is God's 'called" servant rather than their 
"hired" man. A third puzzling situation that has met ys has 
been the need of suitable fields, with resident pastors who may 
keep in touch with the churches they serve. As it is, several, of 
our congregations have good pastors who live far away, an cl con- 
sequently cannot accomplish the work they are quite fitted to 49. 
If the congregations would wisely cooperate in forming iQ.gi.cal 
fields, resident pastors would be availible, and the developn^qnt 
of the churches much more rapid. (We present on the, ,bl,apk- 
board the diagram of the association, with suggestions, for;,the 
formation of fields). These causes are partly responsible, but 
not wholly, for a fourth observation: the need of improved effi- 
ciency through functioning organization. Several of the church- 

.7 



:: MIKUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

es are in need of organizations for men, women or young people: 
and almost as many are no less in need of organizations that 
really accomplish something after they have been set up. 

In conclusion, we offer three or four recommendations. 
Firet of all, let us enlarge and deepen the evangelistic and en- 
listment programs of the churches. It is not meant as a plati- 
tude when we call attention to this, but is intended as a direct 
call to every community to survey its needs, and arise to meet 
them. 

To do this we believe a unified program for our associa- 
tion will be effective. It is planned to have an asociational stew- 
ardship school in December, with the hope of having separate 
schools in the different churches to follow that. If every church 
is represented at the central, earlier study groups, there is a 
likelihood that our churches will be much better organized. 

Another recommendation we offer is that our churches 
undertake to make greater gifts to Kingdom work. While all 
are contributing something, in some cases the amount is pitiably 
small and unworthy. Let us place honorable goals before ouf 
eyes for local and world-wide objects, and no less earnestly 
strive to reach them. 

A final recommendation would refer to the matter of fields. 
We suggest that the executive-promotion committee of the asso- 
ciation seek to bring adout a grouping of churches by getting 
the local congreations to see the field as a whole, and develop a 
spirit of active cooperation among themselves in the matter of 
grouping and calling a pastor. 

Together let us move forward under the banner of our 
King. For sixty years we have advanced under the leadership 
of godly pastors, and devoted laymen and women. Especially do 
we stand grateful and subdued under the shadows of two of 
our grandest leaders, Moderator J. C. Clifford and J. A. Camp- 
bell, for fifty-two years clerk and leader of the Little River. 
God grant we may catch their sacrificial spirit and devotion to 
God, and go in the way He has led. 

ii IN E. Norfleet Gardner, Moderator 

Oct. 29, 1935 

8 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

The following visitors were recognized: L. E. Daily, C. A. 
Upchurch, I. T. Newton, H. H. McMillan, Albert Harrell, Casper 
Warren, W. P. Page. 

The following pastors were recognized: E. N. Gardner, R. 
F. Hall, C. B. Howard, M. F. Booe, C. H. Norris, J. E. Ayscue, 
Scott Turner, L. E. M. Freeman. 

Report on Law Enforcement 

Results of a recent survey show that boys of nineteen years of 
age comprise the larg:est single group of criminals by age through- 
out the country. 

With this fact before us, why compile a lot of figures showing 
how many offenders have been brought before the bar of justice 
charged with violation of one law or another? Or, for that matter, 
wli " ive thru t to .' ler officers of i ^a are endeavoring 
sincerely to do their duty? Would it not be better for us to con- 
sider the whole matter from a different angle — namely, law observ- 
ance? Why are boys who have not reached their majority outnum- 
bering all others as law violators? Is it not because adults, whether 
their own parents or not have been setting examples that, when fol- 
lowed, lead boys to the criminal courts? 

Let us see. Not many evenings ago this writer was visiting in 
a home whose every member was a Baptist. The mother walked in, 
fresh from a bridge party, and upon inquiry from her grown sister 
as to whether she had won a "prize," the mother answered, "Yes — 
see!" and she exhibited her prize. Her son, 14 years of age, working 
on his school books in an adjoining room stepped in to look at the 
prize. Would that Baptist mother be proud of the winnings her boy 
might make in a card game? 

This incident ifs mentioned merely for the Purpose of stressinj? 
the point that observance of law is of prime importance, and it should 
be impressed upon the minds of older people as well as upon the minds 
of the young. For, truly, we cannot expect our young people to be 
so much impressed with the importance of obedience to law until 
we have set our minds and hearts with a fixed purpose to be guided 
by the spirit of the law as well as the letter of it. 

It was our failure to recognize this truth that defeated the 
Eighteenth Amendment. That instrument was doomed to failure from 
its enactment because a majority of the people were determined not 
to abide by it; and among those who were so determined were many 
of our own flock. This may not sound good but when we consider 
that over half of the church members in North Carolina are Baptists, 
we must conclude that we could with main force have whiskey and 
every other evil regulated according to our wishes — if we would only 
wish it. And so it is, we believe, throughout the Nation. 

Here again, we arrive at the conclusion that we have made a 
mistake in depending too strongly upon the forces that are supposed 

9 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

to bring about law enforcement; whereas we should have been at aU 
times stressing temperance. Not until we bring our grown-ups to 
the point of seeing and realizing the wisdom of temperance and law 
observance can we expect our younger people to regard our "shall- 
nots" as instruments for their good. 

I have been for years a constant visitor to courtrooms where of- 
fenders against the law are brqwght before the bar of justice. Late, 
ly there has been a steady increase in the percentage of young white 
men among the offenders. Not long ago a young white man was con- 
victed of highway robbery. His father and mother were absent from 
the trial. Upon inquiry I learned that "they had long before given 
the boy up as beyond hope." He went to prison. The parents are 
church members and are highly respectable people in their community. 
They have means and could have saved the boy from the .downward 
road if only they had realized that they are in fact "their son's 
keepers." 

I have witnessed many cases of like nature, and I have often 
wondered whether the exact ends of justice are met simply by sen- 
tenc' 'he unfortunate offender to prison — whether, indeed, there 
should not be an arm of the law that reaches still further and com- 
pels an accounting from thos$ who are primarily responsible for 
misdeeds upon the part of youngsters. 

When the good king Josiah learned that the Book of the Law had 
been allowed to rest in the rubbish heap, he had it recalled and 
commanded that it be read before the people, that they might in fu> 
ture observe its truths. It occurs to us that here is our example. 
We need a renewal of our acquaintance with the Book of the Law of 
God; we should have it read in our households, that a stricter ob- 
servance of its truths may be laid down for the guidance of old and 
youno'. Only in this way can the law of the land be made a com- 
pelling force. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Henderson Steele. 
The report was read by Henderson Steele, and discussed 
by Mr. Steele, J. E. Ayscue, C. H. Norris, and C. A. Upchurch. 

Report adopted. 



Religious Literature 

Today, more than ever before, there is the universal need for 
religious literature. The business professional, and industrial lead- 
ers read their respective papers and magazines in order to be more 
intelligently informed in their fie'.ds of labor. The value of the 
knowledge gained in this way cannot be easily estimated. As the 
intelligent business-professional man or woman reads for informa- 

10 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

tion and inspiration, so must the intelligent Christian read for the 
nurture of his soul and broaden his consciousness of the meaning 
and need of Christianity in the world today. 

Into every home should go, our state and southwide denomina- 
tional papers; namely, the Biblical Recorder, Charity and Children, 
and Home and Foreign Fields. With these as a beginning we would 
march forward to a greater understanding of Kingdom work until we 
realized the proverb: "Seek the truth, and the truth shall make you 
free." Our denomination would be freed from the careless, ignorant, 
and indifferent members that are the curse to every group of Christ's 
people. For less than the price of a six-month subscription to a daily 
paper all these denominational papers can be had for a year. But 
the value in Kingdom progress and spiritual welfare cannot be com- 
pared. Why can't we wake up to ourselves and to the true values in 
life? 

Anotiier phase of religious literature and one of our denomina- 
tional projects is the Baptist Book Shop located in Raleigh. There 
we can be assured of the best in all fields of Kingdom work — music, 
teaching, preaching, prayer, etc. 

May we resolve to become more intelligent in Kingdom work and 
make of ourselves better, richer, more fruitful Christians by carry- 
ing into our homes some of the riches in religious literature, especial- 
ly that found in our denominational papers. 

Respectfully submitted, 
C. L. Mitchell 

This report was prepared by C. L. Mitchell and read by 
Otha Milliard. L. E. Daily and C. A. Upchurch discussed the re- 
port. Report adopted. 



Special music was rendered by the choir of the First Bap- 
tist Church of Dunn. The congregation sang: "Jesus Shall 
Reign." 

The annual sermon was preached by Rev. Charles B. How- 
ard, using as his text John 8:12. His theme was: "Living the. 
Radiant Christian Life." It was a message that warmed and 
cheered the hearts of all present. 

The moderator appointed the following committe on time, 
place arid preacher: Mrs. H. O. Austin, C. H. Norris, B. B. Wilson 

Mrs. C. D. Bain extended most gracious words of welcome 
to all messengers and visitors. After the benediction by W. P. 
Page, the ladies of the Dunn Church served a bountiful dinner 
in the basement of the church. 

11 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

Prof. A. E. Lynch led in the song service, and delivered 
an address on Church Music. L. E. Daily conducted the devotion- 
al using as a theme: "The Church's Membership." 

Co-operative Program 

This report was read by R. P. Hall and is as follows: 
The Baptist Cooperative Program is a simple plan for promoting 
and supporting all agencies and. institutions through which Southern 
Baptists are endeavoring to carry out the teaching, preachinsr and 
heading program which Christ committed to them. 

The objects sharing in the cooperative Program funds are, State 
Missions, Home Missions, Foreign Missions, Christian Education, Old 
Ministers Relief, Hospitals, (and in most of our States) the Orphan- 
ages. Now instead of magnifying any one of tiiese agencies to the 
exclusion of all the others the Cooperative Program plan is to pre- 
sent all the causes in due season in the most effective way possible, 
and to tie them up in a common financial budget. This plan enables 
the individual Baptist to have a part in helping to support the whole 
program of Jesus — Teaching, Preaching, and Healing, "unto the ut- 
termost part of the earth" (Acts 1:8). Working alone, no one could 
do this, but by cooperating with each other we can have a part in pro- 
moting every phase of Christian work around the world. 

Each dollar contributed to the Cooperative Program in North 
Carolina is divided in the following way: Sixty percent is kept in 
the State, and forty percent goes for Southwide and Worldwide ob- 
jects. 

Southwide 
State Per 

Per cent 

cent Foreign Missions 20 

State Missions 13 Home Missions 9.4 

Debt Service - .- 42 Relief & Annuity „_ -- 2.8 

Hospital 4 Southwide Edu. Bonds 

Ministerial Edu 1 & Seminaries 6^ 

60 Southern Hospital 1 

40 

We believe that the Cooperative Program plan, with an annual 

Every Member canvass, and the tithe as a minimum of Christian 

Stewardship, is the best plan yet devised for the financial support of 

the Lords work both at home and clear around the world. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. F. Hall, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 

12 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

Report on State Missions 
Read by W. M. Morgan. 

The important place of State Missions in the work of the church 
may be realized only when we are reminded that its function is to 
win the people of North Carolina to Christ attract them to the fel- 
lowship of the churches, and to so train and develop those who come 
into our churches that their usefulness may be available to all people 
with whom they may come in contact. By determination on the part 
of our leaders we have made progress in our work. 

The aid extended through State Missions to the weaker churches 
and communities in providing pastoral assistance, physical equipment, 
and student training* particularly in educational centers, is a tangi- 
ble manifestation of the great and lasting benefits attributable often 
times almost wholly to this part of our work. Any one of these ma- 
jor functions is sufficient to justify all that we have done to support 
State Missions, but we have not measured up to the responsibility 
which is imposed upon us by the Jact that of nearly every two church 
members in North Carolina one is a member of our denomination. 
The task, therefore is largely Baptist. 

No church remains at a stand-still with respect to its activities; 
all churches grow in usefulneis or retrogress. The twenty-four 
churches in our Association contributed during the year now ended 

I — ■ to benevolences. Tiie membership of these churches is 

. It may be observed that the per capita membership contri- 
bution was less than $1; and when we take into account that only a 
part of the contributions for benevolences was for State Missions, 've 
may well conclude that our gifts to this cause are, indeed, too small. 
Any program neglecting the weaker churches and communities would 
be as tragic as the neglect of our fellowman, and our Association 
and denomination should harbor nothing so selfish as this mistaken 
idea. With better trained individuals and better developed minds 
we may hope for a greater expansion of State Missions. 

Contributions to State Missions are used in North Carolina where 
we may readily observe the fruits they bear. They are in some in- 
stances the sole means by which many thousands of young men and 
women, boys and girls, may be re .ched. What may we do more 
worthy of tJie Christian than to help the young in our home state? 

Who touches a boy by the Master's plan 

Is shaping the course of the future man; 

For who can measure the pride and joy 

That may some day grow from a little boy? 

We should be stimulated to. more liberal giving, less selfishness, 
and more practical religion. This phase of our work is our line of 
first and last defense, and each and every church should reflect in 

18 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

reality the care and concern of our brothers, even as Christ would 
have it be. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Wm. Morgan 
The reports on Co-operative Program and State Missions 
were discussed by C. H. Dickey. Reports adopted. 



Report on Home Missions 

During the past year, the Lord has blessed the work of the 
Home Mission Board. In every field lost souls have been won to 
Christ. 

There are 228 missionaries working with the Board, and 18 other 
helpers in the Sanatarium, schools, and Good-will centers. In all, 
these missionaries reach 598 stations and preaching places. The 
Board also operates five Good-will centers, two rescue missions, a 
Seamen's Institute, 29 schools and a Sanatorium. Last year the 
Board put 36 New Missionaries on the field and opened 76 New Mis- 
sions. 

Last year's report reveals that the missionaries led 3,740 lost 
people to Christ and baptized them, made 39,515 personal contracts 
with unsaved people, visited 22,000 homes, distributed 443 225 Bibles, 
tracts, and pieces of literature, and delivered 19,538 sermons and 
addresses. 

Our Board is performing its stewardship, as an agency of South- 
em Baptists, in a wonderful way. The work is growing and is 
operating within its income and is paying a considerable amount each 
year on its debts. 

In 1934 the Board received_$320,030.95. This is quite an increase 
over the amount received in 1933. Last year the Board operated with- 
in its budget and met all its obligations without borrowing money for 
current work. 

Our hearts are lifted in gratitude when we review the work of 
the Home Mission Board. We are justly proud of the advancements 
that have been made. But let us not forget that countless millions 
of our neighbors know not Christ. Many influences are at work to 
undermine our civilization. The salvation of our country depends 
upon the enthronement of Christ in the life of our people. Our part 
in the evangelization of the world depends upon the evangelization 
and Christianization of our own land. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. T. Sherman 
This report was written by J. F. Sherman and read by Otha 
Milliard and discussed by Albert Harrell of Waverly, Va. The 
report was adopted. 

14 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

Report on Foreign Missions 

In the Little River Baptist Association there are twenty-four 
churches, twenty-two of which are contributing to the Co-operative 
program. These churches contributed in 1934 to all denominational 
causes the sum of $5,824.50. Just what part of this amount was 
given for foreign missions is not definitely known but probably not 
over one fourth, if I may use my own home church membership as a 
basis from which to draw my conclusions. Our per capita con- 
tributions to all denominational causes is ninety cents. 

The Foreign Mission Board has 400 missionaries and 2,500 native 
workers. Of these, thirty foui^ are from North Carolina. 

Reports from thirteen fields abroad are full of joy and en- 
couragement because of the marked success of the gospel. Last year 
there were 969 baptisms reported in Africa, 358 in Argetina 4,251 
in Brazil, 89 in Chile, 3,235 in China, 680 in Hungary, 202 in Italy, 
121 in JapaU; 229 in Jugo-Slavia,. 343 in Mexico, 7 in Palestine, 5,500 
in Roumania, 74 in Spain a total of 15,969 in all, the greatest number 
ever reported in the history of the Foreign Mission Board. There is a 
revival of interest in the gospel manifest in almost every country. 
The great need is for more workers and the means to meet the ex- 
penses. We rejoice in the thirty three new missionaries which our board 
is sending out this fall. 

Jesus' command to "Go ye, disciple all nations, — baptizing 
them, — teaching them" will be obeyed when the question of steward- 
ship is settled by individual members, according to the teaching of 
God's Word. Our churches exist for the purpose of letting the light 
committed to them, shine to the ends of the earth. They should be 
actively missionary. 

In conclusion, I wish to urge every messenger present here today 
from the churches of the Little River Association to read Matthew 
28:19, 20 and Mar 16:15, 16 and see to it that the cause of Foreign 
Missions is definitely and generously provided for in your church bud- 
get for the coming year. Give your best to the Master. 
Respectfully submitted, 
C. D. Bain 

Dr. G. D. Bain read the report, after which Dr. H. H. Mc- 
Millan delivered an address on "China's Need of Jesus." It was 
one of the greatest missionary messages heard in our association 
ill many years. The report was adopted. 
— 

Mrs. Charles B. Howard sang: "We've a Story to Tell to 
the Nations." 

15 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

Report on State of the Churches 

What is the state of the twenty-four churches of the Little River 
Association ? 

Take the church to which you belong. Then in the silence of 
your room; think of that church until you hear those words of Christ 
"I know thy works." In His report of the seven churches. The build- 
ing fund; the debt on the organ; the mortgage on the Sunday School; 
the architects plans, the choice of a pastor do not appear even by a 
hint. Labor, patience, an abhorrence of evil, love, service and faith; 
opportunity and enoourment and temptation; these are the qualities, 
the circumstances which the Almighty analyzed and over which the 
spirit brooded. 

Men and women and children; not bricks and mortar were His 
concern. Flesh and blood not pews and ventilation. To six out of the 
seven churches the \.'^vd was repent. Ti.e other one. Hold fast. 
Change not your services, your methods, your ministers; so much as 
your hearts and your minds. Equipment is less important than 
morale. 

In our Association we have had fewer baptisms than last year. 
Last year we had 402. This year 257. Most of the churches do not 
expect confessions except during the revivals 

All the churches seem to be well organized with increased in- 
terest and steady growth and more liberal giving for local causes. 

The Missionary spirit has not improved. 

Increased contributions are the result of a better financial con. 
dition rather than a deeper love for the lost. 

When it comes to local improvements that looks good. The 
churches painted; new Sunday School rooms; new pianos; new lights; 
new roofs; new seats; new educational buildings and one new church: 
One new organization, Layton's Chapel near Anderson's Creek school; 
much work for our convenience but litt'e for our spiritual edification. 

There seems to be a deep unrest with some of the churches, not 
satisfied to follow the Lord, but contentions and misunderstandings 
seem to be the order of the day. 

We have spent more money; but we have had less spiritual 
results. 

We need to emphasize spirituality and a deeper sense of our re- 
sponsibility — to do Gods Will. We need to hear and act upon His 
commands. 

Respectfully submitted, 
M. F. Booe 

This report was read by M. F. Booe. One minute talks 
were made by the following: L. E. M. Freeman, Truby Powell, 

16 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

C, H. Norris, W. E. Bond, J. E. Ayscue, Prof. Marshbanks, G. R. 
Wells, Scott Turner, Mr. Weathers, C. D. Bain, (Report continu- 
ed). 



C. H. Norris told of the great work done by J. G. Layton 
in establishing the Layton Chapel Church. L. E. Freeman offered 
the benediction forthe afternoon session. 

TUESDAY NIGHT SESSION 
Prof. A. E. Lynch led the singing. W. E. Bond conducted 
the devotional using as his theme: 'The Church's Message". 

G. T. Noel spoke on the 'Third Building Enterprise of the 
Dunn Baptist Church". H. B. Taylor gave a "Historical Sketch 
of the Dunn Baptist Church". 

Report on Woman's Work 
(To the Little River Association, October 29, 30, 1935. Dunn, N. C.) 

Some years ago at this gathering, we heard a moving tribute to 
the part women play in life, answered in part by the witty represen- 
tative of our Orphanage, who pointed out that without the support — 
financial and often moral — of the husbands in the back ground, wo- 
men could not accomplish the somewhat spectacular things which we 
sometimes claim for ourselves. It is with this well in mind that we 
would present women's work in Southern Baptist Kingdom enter- 
prises. Yet we have cause even so to rejoice in the contribution we 
have been permitted to make since Woman's Missionary Union was 
established in 1888. 

The founding was accompanied by grave doubts and fears on the 
part of men and women of the Southern Baptist Convention and earn- 
est reassurance was necessary that the women did not mean to usurp 
the functions of the men. Is it out of order to suggest that the time 
has come to revive that fear? W. M. U. has become a great organi- 
zatioU; with branches in eighteen states and sister-unions in at least 
bIx foreign countries. Every year hundreds of thousands of dollars 
are received and disbursed by it; it publishes three magazines and 
many leaflets, fosters many kinds of work for the development of the 
missionary spirit among Southern Baptist women and young people, 
and extends a helping hand to missionaries' children, to young peo- 
ple preparing for missionary service, and to struggling groups at 
home and abroad; but always its chief concern is for the direct send- 
ing of the Good News to those who have not heard. 

During the years of depression and debt, as both our Mission 
Boards testify, the work would almost have come to a standstill with- 
out the aid rendered by the W. M. U. special offerings. W. M. U. 

17 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

sent back the missionaries kept at home and now pays the salaries 
of 125 exclusive of the contributions to the others throught the Co- 
operative program gifts; she finances schools, hospitals and publish- 
ing houses which would have been closed, and takes care of other 
projects which would otherwise have been impossible through these 
years. The salary of every Home Missionary on the field of late 
years has been paid by W. M. U., and last year, through the Home 
Mission Offering's receipts, the first new missionaries since the 
debacle of 1928 were sent out, thirty-six of them. In home and 
foreign work, the heartening turn of the tide was first marked by 
the generosity of the W. M. U. special offerings; and the explana- 
tion may perhaps be found in the fact that these yearly offerings are 
first of all Weeks of Prayer, followed by the offering. 

When we ocnsider these facts, and add to them the fact that at 
our great inspirational summer gatherings at Ridgecrest and else- 
where, the preponderance of women is painfully noticeable, we feel 
inclined to say to the brethren, as tliey might have said to us in 
years past, "Come over and help us!" 

At the same time we do not want to forget that the great en- 
terprises of Southern Baptists still as always are carried on by our 
people together in our Associational, State and Southwide groups; 
and that the steady work of paying the debts and carrying on the 
ofttimes discouraging details of these past years which alone have 
made possible the advances, have been the labor of our great South- 
em Baptist agencies still considered largely masculine. Truly as we 
go forward into what, God grant, will be a new day, we go forward 
shoulder to shoulder, with W. M. U. in the position which she has 
ever occupied and ever sought, that of Auxiliary to the Southern 
Baptist Convention. 

If time permitted we would speak of the great advances made in 
our State work this past year under the leadership of Mrs. W. N. 
Jones and Mrs. Edna R. Harris and their co-laborers. In every phase 
of work fostered by W. M. U. we made a good showing. The two 
special North Carolina projects were the paying of the Salary of 
Dr. Vance, medical missionary to China, by our Royal Ambassadors, 
and the sending out and paying the salary of our new young mis- 
sionary to Japan, Helen Dozier, by the women, along with other 
special gifts made in our Fannie Heck offering. 1936 will mark the 
fiftieth anniversary of North Carolina W. M. U., our Union having 
been organized two years before the southwide. We are looking 
forward to a great celebration at our annual meeting in Raleigh, in 
March. 

Coming closer home, the Little River W. M. U. reports an en- 
couraging-, increase in interest and accomplishment, at the same time 
pointing out the great opportunities for advancement. Attention is 

18 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

called to the statistical tables which give the clearest picture of our 
work, and to the report of the Annual meeting held in August at 
Piney Grove Church. Special mention should be made of the love 
and appreciation of every member of our fifty-eight organizations 
toward Mrs. Paul Bradley, for several years our devoted Associa- 
tionai Superintendent, who on account of ill health has been forced to 
resign these duties. 

We report that ©f the twenty-four churches of our Association, 
ten are without any missionary organization. Fourteen have at 
least one, and seven have full graded Unions; while two have added 
the final grading recognized by W. M. U., dividing the Girl's Auxil- 
iaries and Royal Ambassadors into Junior and Intermediate groups. 
Our Association this year won the banner offered in the Wilmington 
Division to the Association of the ten having the largest number 
of full graded Unions; our proportion of 50 per cent gives us a 
lead over several larger Associations. 

Our combined gift to missions in the year 1934 was $2463.89. 
Our goal for 1935 is $2,486.00, of which amount $1,483.10 has been 
contributed in the first three quarters. 

Concerning details of the work, we refer you again to the tables; 
and asking your prayers and help in every church, we, the women 
of your Association, resolve, Go.d helping us, to go forward in 1936 
into greater fields of service in our common Master's name. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. E. N. Gardner 
(For Rev. S. A. Rhyne). 
This report was read by Mrs. E. N. Gardner and discussed 
by Mrs. H. T. Stephens of Ashboro. Six girls of the Dunn Bap- 
tist Church gave a Pantomime of the "Old Rugged Cross". 



Dr. H. H. McMillan of Soochow, China, delivered an ad- 
dress on "Beyond our Borders". ' 



WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION 
Prof. A. E. Lynch led the song service, and gave a brief 
address on "Church Music". H. C. Upchurch conducted the de- 
votional using as a theme, "The Church's Horizon" and "Ye are 
My Witnesses". 

Report on Sunday Schools 
One of the most remarkable movements of our time is the mod- 
em Sunday School movement. Some 80 to 90 per cent of our preach, 
ers come through the Sunday School. Even a larger percent of our 

19 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

church members come to us through the same agency. 

There are now nearly if not quite 2,400 Sunday Schools in our 
state with about 400,000 scholars, and yet there are perhaps 200,000 
church members not in touch with the great Sunday School move- 
ment, and there are large numbers of boys and girls that could be 
enrolled if the proper efforts were made. 

The Sunday School is the . church teaching and studying God's 
word. To do this effectively we need proper organization, good equip- 
ment, and trained teachers and officers. God's book is the most price- 
less book in the world. It is the only book that gives us the truth 
about life here and hereafter. It is the book that deals with the 
eternal verities of the soul. The effects of the teaching of this book 
in the Sunday Schools of the land will tell when the stars cease to 
shine and the hills are no more. Shall we do less than our best then, 
in our efforts to train for effective teaching? 

We would encourage all of our Sunday School leaders to co- 
operate to the fullest extent with our state Sunday School forces in 
their effort to train the officers and teachers and enlist all who ought 
to be in our great study program. To fail here is to bring disaster 
upon us later. The proper work here will yield glorious returns for 
our God and His blessed Son. 

Respectfully submitted, 
W. M. Thomas 

The report was read by W. M. Thomas, after which Perry 
Morgan, State Sunday School Secretary, addressed the body on 
"The Book Vitalized". The report was adopted. 



Report on State of Churches, (Continued). 
M. F. Booe finished his report on "State of Churches". 
The following made brief reports for their respective churches: 
M. F. Booe, H. Y. Smith, Chas . B. Howard, H. C. Upchurch, E. 
C- Womac. Roger Haymon spoke on "Obedience, The Master's 
Test". E. N. Johnson of Mount Olive, a former pastor of the 
Dunn Church, delivered an address on"Obligations of Trustee- 
ship". His address was one of the high-spots of the day. The re- 
port was adopted. 

Mrs. Herman Stephens and Casper Warren sang: He Lift- 
ed Me". 

Report on Christian Education 
Education is the means employed by social groups for passing 
on their accumulated store of facts about life, for indoctrinating the 

20 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

young with the loftiest ideals of the group, for establishing accepted 
attitudes and appreciations, and for the development of those skills 
and habits that are found necessary for successful living. Naturally 
this educative process is colored by the ideals, aims, and available data 
possessed by the particular group sponsoring it. Since early educa- 
tion in America was provided largely under Christian auspices be- 
fore the dawn of our new scientific awakening, it was distinctly 
puritanical in its outlook and in some respects narrow in its curricu- 
lum. Nevertheless, many of us will agree with the editor of the 
Charlotte Observer that it "produced a civilization and a society 
which was far less shoddy and shabby in its fundamental integrities 
than the present slap-stick, lust mad, and realistically liberal culture." 

With the development of our present public school system, made 
necessary in part by the inadequacy of our church supported schools 
to provide equal advantages to all, our denomination abandoned its 
chain of high schools in N. C, numbering 13 in 1910, and confined its 
educational activities to the college field. Today three senior col- 
leges, Wake Forest, Meredith and Chowan are under the sponsorship 
and control of the Baptist State Convention; and two junior colleges, 
Mars Hill in the west and Campbell, here in the bounds of the Little 
River Association. These colleges represent an investment in plants 
and permanent endowments of over seven million dollars, against 
which N. C. Baptists owe at the present time less than one million 
dollars. Common honesty will force us to admit however, that these 
magnificent investments do not form an altogether true index to the 
loyalty and devotion of N. C. Baptists to Christian Education, as much 
of the total has come from large benefactions from wealthy individu- 
als in and out of this State. 

A statistical study of the present status of these colleges will 
indicate a healthy growth in practically every particular. During 
the year probably more than three thousand students will be enrolled 
in these five colleges. Their able faculties of Christian teachers com- 
mand the respect of the educational world. Our plants show steady, if 
not rapid, improvement. Any Baptist may patronize and recommend 
his own denominational institutions with the feeling that the best is 
provided educationally. 

If Baptists realized more fully the importance of Christian Edu- 
cation in the program of evangelizing the world and in the training of 
their own sons and daughters, these schools and colleges would never 
lack for support. The failure of one generation, it has been said, to 
transmit through education its ideals and traditions to the young 
would result in the reversion of the race to barbarism. The fail- 
ure of Christians to teach the Christian philosophy of life and to es- 
tablish Christian virtues among our youth will precede decadence in 

21 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

our church life and a further loss of idealism in all our social rela. 
tionships. 

As friends of Christian Education we should be mindful of the 
problems confronting those who direct the affairs of these institu- 
tions, two of which deserve mention in this report. One of these 
from within the institution itself is that because of the pressure of 
non-Christian influences around about us and the natural tendency to 
copy so-called liberal policies and practices of other colleges and uni- 
versities, we may lose the positive Christian influence that becomes 
our major right for existence. Ecernal vigilance on the part of Chris- 
tian faculties must guard against the introduction of social practices 
and organizations to spiritual growth and development. Another 
danger is that Baptists may a.low these institutions to starve for 
financial support. Fierce competition with well-endowed and well- 
equipped colleges all about us makes it imperative that our own in- 
stitutions have your support. No one of your colleges has received 
one penny for current expenses since 1930. These institutions cannot 
continue to prosper indefinitely on this basis. We must pay our debts 
and liberate with adequate financial support these institutions to 
meet the needs of a new day. 

Respectfully submitted, 
L. H. Campbell 

Pres. L. H. Campbell of Campbell College, read the report, 
after which Dr. W. R. Cullom of Wake Forest College addressed 
the body. He spoke on "Education in the Home; In the Church; 
and in the Christian College". The report was adopted. 



BUSINESS: 

The Committe on Time, Place, Preacher reported. 

Time— October 27-28, 1936: Place— Lillington; Preach- 
er — H. C. Norris, Alternate — H. C. Upchurch. 

Committee 

B. B. Wilson 
Mrs. H. O. Austin 

C. H. Norris 
Report adopted. 

On motion by C. B. Howard the address of E. N. Johnson 
is to be published in the Biblical Recorder. 

On motion G. G. Page, Scott Turner and M. F. Boone 
were appointed as an Auditing Committee. 

On motion by C. B. Howard a "Stewardship School for the 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

Little River Association is to be held at Lillington December 9- 
13, 1935, led by Charles H. Dickey". 

The following visitors were recognized: A. L. Brown, A. L. 
Benton, A. O. Keller, E. C. Keller, and D. M. Branch. 

C. T. McGoogen of the Dunn Church announced that a 
barbecue dinner would be served in the basement of the church. 
The benediction followed immediately, 

— 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 
Song service was led by Prof. A. E. Lynch, after which 
Mr. Lynch spoke on "Selecting Better Songs". A. L. Brown con- 
ducted the devotional using as a theme "The Church's Sustain- 
ing Power". 

Orphanage Report 

Baptist Orphanage work in North Carolina began Fifty (50) 
years ago. During this brief span of time around Four Thousand 
(4,000) boys and girls have been given a chance to succeed. Most 
of them have made good and occupy places of usefulness and honor. 

About Seven Hundred (700) children are being cared for in the 
Mills Home in ThomasvLle and the Kennedy Home in Lenoir County. 

Through Mothers Aid many a deserving widow is able to keep 
her children at home. This has proven to be a practical and con- 
structive type of welfare work. The State should assume a larger 
responsibility in this field of relief. 

Children are received between the ages of two (2) and twelve 
(12); and are dismissed according to preparation rather than age. 

The Orphanage expense bill averages Three Hundred and Eight 
Dollars and Fifty Cents ($308.50) per day. The average cost per 
child is around Sixteen Dollars and Twenty-nine Cents ($16.29) a 
month. 

The cottage system simulates family home life as nearly as is 
possible. Every cottage has its own dining room and kitchen, and is 
supervised by a motherly Christian matron. 

The church life is an importauT; phase of the work. A v/ell or- 
ganized Sunday School is conducted every Sunday morning, followed 
by preaching services at eleven o'clock. Young peoples <^rganiza- 
tions meet every Sunday evening, followed by a service for the en- 
tire church. 

The school work is graded, from a kindergarten through the 
eleventh grade. Special courses are given in short hand, typewriting: 
and home economics. Music is taught daily. The children go to 
school half the day and are on duty (those old enough) the other half. 

23 



:; MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

A library of Four Thousand (4 000) selected volumes together 
with good papers and magazines supply ample reading for the young 
people. 

The gardens, the farms, the dairy, the poultry department, the 
laundry, the sewing room and the print shop, while supplying a need 
for the Orphanage provide vocational training for the boys and girls. 

CHARITY AND CHILDREN is the Orphanage publication and 
should be a regular weekly visitor in every Baptist home in the State. 
The price to single subscribers is One Dollar ($1.00) per year; in 
clubs of ten (10) or more, Sixty, Cents (60c)j per copy a year. 

The main support of the Orphanage work comes from the once-a- 
month collections from the Sunday Schools. The Thanksgiving offer- 
ing helps greatly. 

It is urgently recommended that during the coming year in every 
Sunday School in the Little River Baptist Association; a designated 
once-a-month collection be sent to the Orphanage; that every church 
make a Thanksgiving offering to the Orphanage work; that every 
Sunday School make special effort to send in a club subscription to 
CHARITY AND CHILDREN. 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. G. Layton 
This report was read and discussed by J. G. Layton. 



Supt. I. G. Greer of the Mills Home delivered an address 
that stirred the hearts of all present. The report was adopted. 

Hospital Report 

Since the opening of the Baptist Hospital which is located on a 
beautiful elevation in Western "Winston-Salem, May 28, 1923 to July 
15, 1935, 29,000 patients have entered for treatment. In the first 
half of the year 1935, 1,760 patients have been treated. At this rate 
the Hospital will have 3 520 patients this year or 31,260 patient days. 
Of this 11,882 will be full pay, 9,704 part pay and 9,674 free. 

The Hospital has had an average of 86 patients per day for 
the last six months and is now averaging 300 per month. Almost one- 
half of patient days are service, _or free days. 

From the foregoing, it is apparent that it costs a large amount 
of money to care for this increasing number of patients coming from 
practically every section of the State. The Hospital must depend very 
largely on the offerings of the churches and Sunday Schools to care 
for these hundreds and hundreds of patients who can't pay for treat- 
ment. 

The Women's Missionary Unions of the State, in addition to their 
cash contributions, have sent to the Hospital during the first six 

24 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

months of this year, 3,635 articles of linen, consisting of sheets, 
spreads, pillow cases, towels, etc. These are much needed and much 
appreciated. 

Mother's Day (the second Sunday in May) has been designated by 
the denomination as "Hospital Day". If only all of our churches 
would seriously put on a well planned Mothers Day program enough 
money could be provided to amply care for this vast host of people 
who can't provide this service for themselves. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Lillie Davis 

The report was writen by Miss Lillie Davis and read by the 
cierk. Report adopted. 



Report of Promotion Committee 

Your committee is composed of a chairman, the officers of the 
association, the pastors of all the churches and one representative 
member from each of the churches. For the complete list see page 
six of the minutes of the last session. 

The committee met in called session December 14th and adopted 
a program of progress and development for all the churches of the 
association. Nearly all the churches were represented and the adop- 
tion of the program was unanimous. Full copy of this program will 
be found upon pages 26 and 27 of the minutes of last session. The 
program involves, 1. All our organizations enlarged and strengthened; 
2. Spiritual development; 3. A financial plan. Each member of the 
committee accepted a copy of the program and obligated himself to 
take it back to his church for consideration. Many of the churches 
adopted it as a plan of work. Your committee submits with this 
report this program for endorsement by the body. 

Three other meetings have been held during the year. At each of 
these much constructive work was done. Special effort has been made 
for symmetrical devevlopment of the churches along the lines sug- 
gested in the program and looking toward greater achievement next 
year. The matter of grouping the churches into fields and setting 
of financial goals have been duly considered. The committee heartily 
endorses the purpose of Stewardship Schools to be held in the associa- 
tion in November. 

Your committee heartily commends the continuation of the plan 
of having every church in the association represented on the commit- 
tee for the following reasons: 1. It is in harmony with the democracy 
of Baptist principle; 2. It makes every church feel that it is a very 
vital part of the association; 3. It opens the doors of all our churches 

25 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

to our whole Baptist program; 4. It tends toward the symmetrical de- 
velopment of all the churches. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. G. Page, for the committee. 
Read by G. G. Page and discussed by Mr. Page and H. Y. 
Smith. Report adopted. 

0- 

Aged Ministers 
The subject of aged ministers, it seems, is losing interest with 
our people. While this subject should claim our sympathetic, active, 
interest. Since we have had an annuity board, there seems to be a 
general feeling that they should take advantage of it and so provide 
for old age. But we should remember that many of our preachers 
are not sufficiently supported during their active life to be able to 
insure. While this should not be so, we admit, whose is it to prevent. 
In our hurry, bustling times little is said about supporting this object. 
Your writer well remembers when this object was better kept before 
our people, but of late, not much is said about it. 

All our churches should make an offering to this worthy cause 
and all of us should see to it that socially and every way we can, 
make the declining years of worn out ministers more pleasant as well 
as more comfortable. 

Respectfully submitted, 
H. Y. Smith 
This report was read by H. Y. Smith. Report adopted. 



Report on Associational Missions 
A little investigation reveals some facts and conditions that 
make us appreciate the work that is being done in our Association 
more and more, also make us regret that we have not taken advantage 
of the opportunities in our Association in a greater way. 

Our Association covers right much territory and there are places 
in the Association that are in need of spiritual training and guidance. 
We as christians need to look about us and locate the needy places 
and people — those that are not in any way organized in church and 
Sunday School work — and go to work at the glorious task of enlist- 
ing them. There is also more room for much good to be done working 
with our unfortunate groups. Our prison camps are well provided for, 
by our state authorities, with material things but we christian peo- 
ple are failing to use our opportunities in a great way with this 
group. Those in charge say the prisoners need the services of chris- 
tian people and are always benefitted by any form of spiritual serv- 
ice* rendered. We are cordially invited to visit our camp more often 

26 



:: MINUTES OF THE L[TTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

and render any kind of a program that we wish to. In our prison 
camp near LiUington there are 86 men, about 60 of which are hus- 
bands and fathers. They need our services. 

We are invited to visit our shut-ins at the County Home more 
frequiently with spiritual programs. The younger christians of our 
Association will be received gladly at the County Home and will find 
opportunity there to render much service to the 42 aged souls. Visi- 
tations by our young people with peppy spiritual programs are wel- 
comed and invited. 

Antioch Batist church holds prayer meeting once each month at 
the County Home. Also the 2nd Sunday afternoon in each month at 
the C. C. Camp near LiUington. where there are 205 men. 

The people in and near Duncan are carrying on a Mission Sunday 
School in a commendable way. There is not a church in Duncan but 
the people meet in an old store building with an average attendance 
of 50 or more the year round. They have six rooms curtained off 
to accommodate their six organized classes and from these classes six 
of their young people made public confession during the year. There 
is a splendid opening, in this particular Sunday School, for a live B. 
T. U. Organization. There are splendid possibilities in the Duncan 
section, and we are invited to visit them often and help with the work. 
Respectfully submitted, 
J. F. Blackmon 
Read by J. F. Blackmon ana aiswussed by Mr. Blackmon, 
Mr. Medlin, Scott Turner, J. G. Layton spoke on the beginning 
of the Harmony Church and also on the La^ ton's Chapel Church, 
Mr. Layton has given much of his time and money in the es- 
tablishing of these two churches. On motion the Promotion Com- 
mittee was asked to arrange for services to be conducted in 
Layton's Chapel by C- mpbell College Ministerial students. 
Report adopted. 



Report on B. T. U. 
Another year has passed with all of its glorious prospects and 
challenging opportunities. Baptist training schools have been con- 
ducted, conferences, rallies, institutes, and conventions held. Church 
members have been trained in our doctrines in our practices, in mis- 
sions and in the everyday work of our church. The past with its 
seeming failures and successes, is now history. As we look at the 
record of our own association, we note that fourteen of the twenty- 
four churches have one or more Baptist Training Organizations, 
leaving ten churches with no training union. We have nine general, 
two adult, twelve senior, seven intermediate, nine junior and two 

27 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

story hour organizations making a total of thirty-two unions with 
approximately seven hundred members enrolled. 

While we are grateful for the accomplishments of the past year, 
we are not satisfied with such a small percent of our church members 
enrolled in this training service. 

The denomination needs people of clear vision, flaming enthus- 
iasm and holy courage. Never before has the need for trained chris- 
tians been so urgent. We should no longer say, "Parents send your 
child to the B. T. U." but we should say, "Bring him and enlist your- 
self." Realizing this our associational officers have adopted a worthy 
goal for the year. As we return to our churches, may we go back 
with a deep yearning to reach this goal by enlisting every member of 
our church in the Baptist Training Union. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Zula Rogers 

Read by Miss Zula Rogers and discussed by Miss Janie 
Ipock, who spoke on "Stewardship of Youth". Report adopted. 


Report on Obituaries 

May we pause for a brief moment to remember our friends and 
co-workers who have gone from our churches, since our last meeting. 
Lovingly and reverent.y do we bring to your remembrance the 
names of your friends to whom our Father has said, "it is enough". 
"Come" and they have gone to join other loved ones over there. 
That cloud of witnesses, the vacant chair. 
The broken circle tell us are our loved ones over there. 
They call us upward, unseen joys to share. 
Some of these have gone in the bloom of youth. Some in the 
prime of life while others gave many years of service to the Master. 
"Let no one tell you that old age is going dov>rn hill. As the years go 
by wo c.imb higher and higher until by and by we reach the heights 
where God is." 

With these we do not associate death, for to the child of God 
there is no death. We would only remember that these have passed 
into God's other Hoom, into that beautiful country where existance is 

eternal, then 

"Only good-night, not farewell, 
Until we meet again before His throne. 
Until we know even as we are known, 
Good-night( beloved, good-night." 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mattie Bain 

28 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

Read by Miss Mattie Bain. The body stood while the re- 
port was being read in silent tribute to our departed dead. 


The Little River Association adjourned to meet at the 
Lillington Baptist Church next year, October 27-28, 1936. 

Mr. Perry Morgan offered the closing prayer. 

E. N. GARDNER, Moderator. 
R. F. HALL, Clerk-Treasurer. 



21 > 



MINUIES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



OUR HOME GOEI^S 






ANGIER 

Mr. J. A. Butts 
ANTIOCH 

Miss Thelma Stewart 

Mrs. Mary B. Wade 

Mrs. Mary E. Morrison 

Mrs. Flora Collins 

Mrs. Barbara Patterson 

Mrs. BeAa Lanier 

Mrs. Vance C. Page 

Mr. W. A. Page 

Mr. J. A. C. Brown 

Mr. Aven Matthews 
BETHEL 

Mrs. Sarah Page 
BROADWAY 

Mr. T. V. Kelly 

Mrs. Ottis K. Cox 
BUIE'S CREEK 

Mrs. Sallie Matthews 

Mrs. U. W. Gregory 

Miss Onea Gregory 

Mrs. B. C. Campbell 
CHALYBEATE SPRINGS 

Mr. Evander Smith, Deacon 

Mrs. Kathryn Smith 
COATS 

Mr. L. C. Parrish 
DUNN 

Miss Fannie Lane 

Mrs. Mollie Ammons 

Mr. J. C. Clifford, Deacon 

Mrs. Eldridge Lee 

Mrs. R. L. Denning 

Mr. Tynis Naylor 

Mrs. Milton Raynar 



Mr. V. L. Stephens 

Mr. R. M. Warren, Deacon 

Mr. Cecil West 
ERWIN 

Mrs. J. B. Sessoms 

Mrs. Walter Norris 

Mr. W. F. Dawkins 
FRIENDSHIP 

Mr. J. W. Byrd 
HARMONY 

Mr. Caul Jarman 
HOLLY SPRINGS 

Mr. N. A. Patterson, Deacon 
KENNEBEC 

Mrs. Mary Tutor 

Mr. P. O. McLean 
LILLINGTON 

Miss Aj^nes T. Gentry 
MACEDONIA 

Mrs. Pearl Betts 
OAK GROVE 

Mr. J. R. Pate 

Mr. J. D. Denton 

Mr ,T. A. Betts. Deacon 
PINEY GROVE 

Mr. E. T. Spence 

Mrs. Blannie Penny 

Mr. John Nash 

Mrs. Henrietta McKee 

Mr. W. A. Mason 

Mr. W. B. Jones, Deacon 

Mrs. Armanty Smith 

Mrs. Lena Smith 

Mr. Allan Gilbert 
SWANN'S STATION 

Mr. L. G. Weathers 



30 



ANNUAL MEETING 

of the 

Woman's Missionary Union 

LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 
Piney Grove Baptist Church, August 30th^ 1935. 

In the absence of Mrs. Paul Bradley, superintendent, the 
meeting was called to order by Mrs. D. D. Overby in the singing 
of the hymn, "All Hail the Power of Jesus Name". 

Using the 96 Psalm, the devotional was led by Mrs. R. E. 
Austin, followed by prayer by Miss N. Smith. All together re- 
peated our 1935 "Watchword"— Psalm 20:5. 

Greetings extended to the visitors by Mrs. O. D. Lyon. 
Dn account of the absence of the speaker, no response was made. 

Roll call of the societies— Angier, Antioch, Chalybeate 
Springs, Lillington, Piney Grove, and Harmony a newly organiz- 
ed society resonded. 

Mrs. E. N. Gardner spoke on "Lift High the Banner of 
Mission Study", and urged that we not go backwards in mission 
study but continue on intelligent study about the Kingdom of 
God. 

"Lift High the Banner of Stewardship" by Mrs. D. D. 
Overby. Cards were distributed covenanting stewardship and 
prayer was made by Rev. R. F. Hall in rededication of self and 
our all. 

Superintendent's Report 

In order to be informed on all our work, be a Biblical Re- 
corder reader by Mrs. V. L. Stephens. 

Committees Appointed by Superintendent 

NOMINATING— Mesdames Durham Taylor, D. H. Senter, and 
Miss Mattie Bain. 

TIME and PLACE — Mesdames Tom Stewart, Lucas and Miss 

Letha McLeon. 

Visitors were recognized: Mr. Upchurch and Miss Mary 
Gurrin, State Young People's Leader. 



MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 



Rev. R. F. Hall introduced Mr. McMillan, a missionary from 
China who joyously gave us an inspirational insight into his 
work with the Chinese. 

Superintendent announced that Miss Mary Cox asked that 
we have a Margarett Fund Chairman appointed for the Associ- 
ation. 

Special music by little Miss Austin. 



AFTEKNOON SESSION 

Hymn — "Lead on, O King Eternal". 

Devotional conducted by Rev. E. N. Gardner on the words 
of Jesus: "Lift Up,- Pray Ye,- Go Ye". 

Mrs. W. E. Nichols gave her report on the Young People's 
Work and urged that a young people's director be appointed 
in each church and that we build much Bible study and prayer in- 
to the well-rounded family of organizations. Attention was call- 
ed to some things done in the association such as the mother- 
daughter banquet at Dunn; morning and evening vespers by 
Campbell Collge Y. W. A. as well as teas and mission study class- 
es held. Some plans forthe year that we should not forget are Y. 
W. A. week at Ridgecrest! G. A. House party, Nov. 8-9 that the 
Lottie Moon offering he laid upon the hearts of the young peo- 
ple: that the Margarett Fund be emphasized; that Mission Study 
classes be held; and that the young people's page in the Biblical 
Recorder be read diligently. 

"Why Margarett Fund?" was discussed by Miss Letha Mc- 
Leon and "Do You Know Your Training School?" by Miss Mat- 
tie Bain. Miss Mary Currin State Young People's Leader then 
told of the plans for the young people for the coming year. It 
is desirable that there be two meetings during the year: 

JUNIOR RALLY— in afternoon meeting — G. A's. & 
Sunbeams. Another afternoon until 9 o'clock in 
which there would be business, stewardship contest, 
and inspirational address with Y. W. A's., Int. G. A's. 
and R. A's. in attendance. 
Our attention wass called to the following Southwide meet 
ing for Y. W. A. girls Focus Week and R. A. conclave, Nov. 1-2, 

32 



:: MINUTES OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :: 

Gastonia's Annual Houseparty for G. A's., Nov. 8-9, Meredith Y. 
W. A. Camp next year at Ridgecrest. 

50th Anniversary of Sunbeam work in our state will be 
featured next year. 

Our quota for World Comrades 1635 

Y. W. A. Window 920 

Following these items of interest a mesage on "Lift Ye the 
Banner" was brought home to each of us. 

Dramatization of "We've a Story to Tell to the Nations*' 
by the Angier Intermediate G. A's. was much enjoyed. 

Appreciation was expressed to all taking part on the pro- 
gram by Mrs. D. D. Overby, and special prayer was made by Mrs. 
E. N. Gardner for Mesdames Harris and Bradley, our State Cor- 
responding secretary and Associational superintendent. 

Nominating Committe reported for Superintendent, Mrs. 
E. N. Gardner, Dunn; Secretary, Mrs. V. L. Stephens, Dunn; Lead 
er of Young People, Mrs. A. L. Overby, Angier; Assistant, Mrs. 
Beulah Gatty, Mamers; Personal Service Chairman, Mrs. Allen 
Shaw, Lillington; Stewardship Chairman, Mrs. D. D. Overby, 
Angier ;Mision Study Chairman, Mrs. C. E. Raiford, Erwin; Mar- 
garett Fund Chairman, Mrs. W. E. Nicholas, Coats, 
at Erwin. Both reports adopted. A special collection of $8.00 

Time and Place Committee reported Friday in August, 1936 
was made to Mr. McMillan and Associational expenses were 
raised and a rising vote of thanks was extended tothe Piney 
Grove women for their generous hospitality. 



33 



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r^^^^-^:.'t<r^:^''^ 



MINUTES 

of the 

SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 

Little River 

Baptist 
Association 

held with 

LILLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 26-27, 1936 

Rev. E. N. Gardner Moderator, Dunn, N. C. 

Rev. C. B. Howard, Vice-Moderator, Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Rev. R. F. Hall, Clerk-Treasurer, Lillington, N. C. 

The Next Annual Session Will Be Held With The Rawls 

Baptist Church, October 26-27, 1937. 

Rev. John W. Lambert is to Preach the Annual Sermon. 



^ap^s 



MINUTES 

of the 

SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 

Little River 
Baptist 

Association 

North Carolina 

held with 
LILLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 

October 26-27, 1936 



Rev. E. N. Gardner Moderator, Dunn, N. C. 

Rev. C. B. Howard, Vice-Moderator, Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Rev. R. F. Hall, Clerk-Treasurer, Lillington, N. C. 



The Next Annual Session Will Be Held With The Rawls 

Baptist Church, October 26-27, 1937. 

Rev. John W. Lambert is to Preach the Annual Sermon. 



Printed By 

THE RECORD PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Zebulon, North Carolina 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 

oOo 

Promotion-Executive Committee — 1936-37 

L. H. CAMPBELL, Chairman, Buie's Creek 

Gardner, Rev. E. N., Moderator, Pastor_j___ Dunn 

Hall, Rev. R. P., Clerk-Treasurer, Pastor Lillington 

Ayscue Rev. J. E., Pastor Buie's Creek 

Bond, Rev. W. E., Pastor Willow Springs 

Freeman, Dr. L. E. M., Pastor Raleigh 

Motley, Rev. G. E., Pastor Wake Forest 

Ousley, Rev. John, Pastor Wake Forest 

Turner, Rev. G. Scott, Pastor Erwin 

Milliard Rev. Otha, Pastor Fuquay Springs 

Holloway, Julius . Buie's Creek 

Memory, Rev. J. L, Pastor Buie's Creek 

Howard, Rev. C. B., Pastor Buie's Creek 

Upchurch, Rev. H. C, Pastor Cary 

Norris, C. H., Pastor Wake Forest 

Poole, Wm. Pastor Fayetteville 

Hare, Frank, Pastor Jonesboro 

Lambert, John W., Pastor Broadway 

oOo 



ANGIER C. W. Flowers, Broadway 

ANTIOCH J. C. Bullock, Route 3, Lillington 

BAPTIST CHAPEL J. R. Howard, (Route), Jonesboro 

BAPTIST GROVE Aubrey Sexton Fuquay Springs 

BETHEL J. A. West, (Route), Manchester 

BUIE'S CREEK B. P. Marshbanks, Buie's Creek 

BROADWAY W. M. Thomas, Broadway 

CHALYBEATE SPRINGS Early W. Smith, Varina 

COATS Miss Mattie Bain, Coats 

CUMBERLAND UNION A. M. Thomas, (Route), Varina 

DUNN C. D. Bain, Dunn 

ERWIN W. C. Stone, Erwin 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



FRIENDSHIP Fred Hobbs, Bunnlevel 

HOLLY SPRINGS B. B. Wilson, R. F. D., Broadway 

KENNEBEC M. T. Olive, Willow Springs 

LILLINGTON Mrs. J. G. Layton, Lillington 

MACEDONIA Ed Holt, Holly Springs 

HARMONY C. L. O'Brian, R. 1 Bunnlevel 

NEILL'S CREEK Jessie Keith, Lillington 

OAK GROVE Leland Matthews, R. 2, Angier 

PINEY GROVE I. L. Howell, Varina 

PLEASANT MEMORY M. Denning, (Route), Coats 

RAWLS J. F. Sherman, Fuquay Springs 

SWAN'S STATION E. C. Womack, R. F. D., Jonesboro 

oOo 

Chairmen of Committees — 1937 

Aged Ministers Miss Mattie Bain 

B. T. U Truby Powell 

Christian Education L. H. Campbell 

Foreign Missions Mrs. C. E. Raeford 

Home Missions Mrs. J. F. Andrews 

Hospitals Julius Holloway 

Temperance and Public Morals Dr. C. D. Bain 

Orphanage J. C. Croom 

Obituaries Fred Hobbs 

Religious Literature W. M. Thomas 

State Missions Mrs. J. G. Layton 

State of Churches C. B. Howard 

Sunday School G. G. Page 

Womans Work Mrs. E. N. Gardner 

oOo 

3 



:-: LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :-: 

ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL ORGANIZATION 

G. G. PAGE Chairman 

JOHN W. LAMBERT, Vice-Chairman 

MISS MAMIE HAIGHWOOD, Secretary 

oOo 

B. T. U. KEY WORKERS and ADDRESS 

Antioch Truby Powell Lillington 
Angier Egeta Williams Angier 
Baptist Chapel Margaret Thomas Broadway 
Baptist Grove Veldon Sexton Fuquay Springs 
Bethel Mrs. Susan Elmore Manchester 
Broadway Pearl Thomas Broadway 
Chalybeate Springs Ophelia Matthews Kipling 
Coats Rosa Edwards Coats 
Cumberland Union A. M. Thomas Fuquay Spring^ 
Dunn Pearl Faircloth Dunn 
Erwin James Sessoms Erwin 
Friendship , Blanche Strickland Bunnlevel 
Holly Springs Erma Knight Broadway 
Kennebec Avis Smith Willow Springs 
Lilington Mamie Haighwood Lillington 
Macedonia Roy Weathers Holly Springs 
Neil's Creek Juanita Johnson Lillington 
Oak Grove M. S. Denning Goats 
Piney Grove Ollie Smith Fuquay Springs 
Rawls Otha Hilliard Fuquay Springs 
Swann's Station Vivian Walker Jonesboro 
Pleasant Memory Julius Holloway Buie's Creek 
Harmony Andrew Yarborough Bunnlevel 
Buie's Creek Addie Prevatte Buie's Creek 
oOo 

ASSOCATIONAL B. T. U. OFFICERS 

President Truby Powell 

Vice-President Bennie Slaughter 

Sec'y.-Treas Miss Mamie Haighwood 

oOo 

4 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



District Leaders: 

1. Western Miss Mary Frances Wilson 

2. Central Miss Violet Penny 

3. Eastern Julius Hollowady 

Junior Leader Miss Bessie McNeal 

Intermediate Leader Miss Frances Byrd 

Senior Leader Miss Letha McLean 

Adult Leader Miss Addie Prevatt 

Pianist Miss Lunette Wilder 

Chorister Raymond Moore 

_ oOo 

PROCEEDINGS 

Tuesday Morning Session 

The Sixty-First Annual Session of the Little River Baptist 
Association convened with the Lillington Baptist Church, Tues- 
day morning, October 27, 1936. 

Rev. Gerald Motley conducted the devotional service using 
as his subject: "Serving for His Sake". 

The congregation sang: "In the Cross of Christ I Glory". 
Mr. Motley led in prayer. 

On motion by R. F. Hall, all present representatives of the 
churches constituted the voting body to elect officers of the 
association. 

The moderator recognized Bro. J. A. McMillan of Thomas- 
ville and Bro. J. M. Page of Raleigh. 

The clerk called the roll of churches and all the churches in 
the association were represented except Harmony. However, 
Harmony was represented a little later in the session. 

Report on Religious Literature. This report was read by 
Miss Zula Rogers and discussed by Bro. J. M. Page of Raleigh. 
The report was adopted. 

RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 



People are largely influenced by what they read. Never before has 
there been a time when the boys and girls of our land had more un- 
wholesome literature thrown about them than today. In the dime 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



stores they find cheap novels and wild west stories. The magazine 
racks of the drug stores are stocked with "True Story" and other mag- 
azines that are detrimental to the Christian life. 

Someone has said that the way to keep a boy from eating green 
apples is to give him plenty of ripe ones. Can we not apply the same 
principle to reading ? If our church does not provide wholesome litera- 
ture which will instill high ideals, create a desire for pure living, and 
stimulate our members to render unselfish service who will? 

Into each of our Baptist homes, the Biblical Recorder, Charity atid 
Children and The Home and Foreign Fields, should go as constant vis- 
itors. One cannot expect to be an informed Baptist without these per- 
iodicals. 

The Biblical Recorder was founded by Thomas Meredith more 
than two hundred years ago. Slice that time it has disseminated the re- 
ligious news of our denomination. The present circulation is 12,500, 
about 250 of these are in the Little River Association. 

The Recorder seeks to bring our people weekly a summary of our 
Baptist interpretation of the events of the day. It seeks to record the 
achievements of our schools, churches, Sunday Schools, Baptist Train- 
ing Unions and laymen's work. It carries news from our missionaries 
at home and abroad, and informs the reader of what is being ac- 
complished through his contributions. 

The Home Circle offers help for the development of the spiritual 
and intellectiJal needs in every young church member. It seeks to in- 
culcate high ideals in our young people and to be of help in the develop- 
ment of Christian character. 

The price of the Recorder is |2.00 per year or $1.00 for six months. 
A church by securing a number of subscriptions equal to ten per cent 
or more of its membership, may get the Recorder for $1.50 per year. 

We recommend that a day be observed in each of our churches to 
stir up the mind and conscience on the subject of religious and Baptist 
literature. That on this day one or more copies of each of our Baptist 
periodicals and a large number of good books be on display and that 
a practical application follow the presentation of the subject by se- 
curing at least ten per cent of the membership as subscribers to the 
Biblical Recorder. 

We recommend that the committee on periodicals appointed at 
this session of the associaton cooperate with the pastors in the ob- 
servance of Religious Literature Day in their churches and to report 
whatever gains have been made in subscriptions to our periodicals and 
the number of books added to their libraries as a result of the observ- 
ance of Religious Literature Day in the churches. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Rev. C. H. Norris preached the annual sermon from Matt. 
12:38-42, using for a text: "Behold, a greater than Jonas is 
here." 

Bro. Norris denounced the modern sins of today; dancing, 
gambling, and drinking, and urged all church members to strive 
to live up to the standard Jesus set for His followers. 

Bro. R. E. Austin led in prayer. 

Moderator's Message 

Bro. E. N. Gardner delivered a most instructive message 
concerning our work in the Little River Association. 

Election of Officers 
The following officers of the association were duly elected: 

Rev. E. N. Gardner Moderator 

Rev. C. B. Howard Vice-Moderator 

Rev. R. F. Hall Clerk-Treasurer 

Report on Orphanage 

This report was read by Miss Ada Overby and discussed by 
Rev. J. A. McMillan of Thomasville. Report was adopted. 

REPORT ON. ORPHANAGE 



"Those who would work among society in the name of Christ, 
must always recognize the 'Child in the Midst'." Christ's ministry to 
children was a beautiful and prominent part of His work here on earth. 
We must continue that ministry for the "little sheep.'* 

The Baptist Orphanage was founded by our Baptist fathers Nov- 
ember 15, 1885, nearly 50 years ago. Since that time the home has tak- 
en care of, and trained for, useful citizenship over 4000 boys and girls. 
Many of these have become leaders in different walks of life. 

At the present there are at the Orphanage and Kennedy Home, 
over 700 children that our Baptist people in this State are taking 
care of. In addition to these, around 300 children living in their own 
homes with their mother are being aided through our Mother's Aid 
Department. The most of these children are normal children, coming 
from good parentage, but driven by misfortune to seek a refuge in 
the hearts of North Carolina Baptists. At the home they are given 
the very best of medical care, a good high school education, and they 
also have access to a splendid church and Sunday School. They are 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



also taught to work, and leave the home in a position to do something 
for themselves and society at large. 

"Pure religion and undefiled before God and the Father is this: 
To visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction." James 1 :27. In 
this Scripture is pointed the fruits and proofs of the Christian religion. 
The Baptist Orphanage is the witness to the world that in the Baptist 
churches of this state there is religion "pure and undefiled." 

The chief support of the Orphanage comes from the Sunday school 
collection, Thanksgiving offering, and receipts from Charity and Chil- 
dren. On Thanksgiving the home has learned to depend on our Baptist 
people and the churches for a great offering. We would urge upon our 
people, especially our pastors and Sunday school superintendents, the 
importance of holding a service at every church in the Association on 
that day. It is wonderful how much progress the home has made with 
this income, but our hearts ache when we hear of our Orphanage hav- 
ing to say "we have no room for you." Shall we help this noble insti- 
tution do a greater work by increasing our gifts or shall we bid it stay 
its outstretched hands and say to the many who are asking for food 
and shelter, we have no bread to give, no clothing to offer? If there is 
anything that should touch our hearts it ought to be a child whose 
father and mother are dead. We urge a larger regular giving by the 
Sunday schools once a month; a larger increase in the ''One day for 
the Orphanage." The marvelous way in which the Lord has blessed the 
institution is a loud call for our continued loyalty. 

*Tf we do not care, we do not give; 
If we do not give, we do not help." 

Let us not fail to minister to these who represent our Saviour for 

"Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my 

brethren, ye have done it unto me." 

Respectfully submitted, 
ADA M. OVERBY. 



The following committee was appointed on Time, Place and 
Preacher for the next annual meeting: 

G. G. Page, D. H. Senter, and Mrs. Harvey O'Quinn 

The Committee on Nominations was appointed as follows: 
G. Scott Turner, Mrs. R. F. Hall, Mrs. R. D. Taylor, H. O. Austin, 
and G. L. Stone. 

The moderator recognized Bro. Smith Hagaman of Winston- 
Salem, Superintendent of our Baptist Hospital. Rev. John W. 
Lambert was also recognized as one of our new pastors in the 
association. 

Bro. C. B. Howard announced that dinner had been prepar- 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



ed by the ladies of the Lillington Church, and would be served 
in the building. After prayer by Bro. C. W. Flowers, the Associa- 
tion adjourned for dinner. 

oOo 

Tuesday Afternoon Session 
The congregation sang: "We're Marching To Zion", and 
Rev. John W. Lambert conducted the devotional using as his 
subject: "The hands of the Master." He pictured the hands of 
Jesus as the — 1. Toiling hands. 2. Intreating hands. 3. Bles- 
sing hands. 4. Suffering hands. 

Report on State of Churches 
This report was read by Bro. C .B. Howard and discussed 
by Bro. Howard and one representative from each church in the 
association. The report was adopted. 

Report on Christian Education 

This report was read by B. P. Marshbanks and discussed by 
Dr. I. M. Mercer of Meredith College. Report adopted. 

REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 



Christian people were the first to realize the need of an educated 
leadership and therefore they were the first to establish and maintain 
schools and colleges. The most dependable leadership as in the past, is 
nOw and will continue to be, the product of the Christian college. The 
confused and uncertain conditions under which we now are living pre- 
sent a definite challenge to the Baptist Brotherhood to give their insti- 
tutions just the support that will enable them to function most effec- 
tively in the carrying forward all Kingdom agencies. 

Woodrow Wilson said, "The Christian college is the light-house of 
Civilization." W. L. Poteat says, "The Christian college is the center 
for the reorganization of society after the mind of Christ." It is only 
the Christian college that can really have God as a co-worker in the 
trikining of young men and women. They are the only ones that can 
tf«ly say, "God and I are working together at this all important task 
of training the whole man, physical, social, mental and spiritual. Mea- 
sured by God's standard no person is prepared for any wortthwhile task 
until he has both head and heart trained. Moses was useless in God's 
plans, even though he had the finest that Egyptian universities could 
give, until he spent forty years in the wilderness. It is the task of the 
Christian school to endeavor to give its students both this spiritual 
training, making their standards of scholarship as high as the best 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



and their standards of character and ideals in keeping with those of 

Jesus, the master teacher. 

One paragraph from President Campbell's report last year is even 

more timely now than it was a year ago. 

As friends of Christian Education we should be mindful 
of the problems confronting those who direct the affairs of 
these institutions, two of which deserve mention in this re- 
port. One of these from within the instituton itself, is that 
because of the pressure of non-Christian influences around 
about us and the natural tendency to copy so-called liberal 
policies and practices of other colleges and universities, we 
may lose the positive Christian influence that becomes our 
major right for existence. Eternal vigilance on the part of 
Christian faculties must guard against the introduction of so- 
cial practices and organizations harmful to spiritual growth 
and development. Another danger is that Baptists may allow 
these institutions to starve for financial support. Fierce com- 
petition with well-endowed and well-equipped colleges all 
about Us makes it imperative that our Own institutions have 
your support. No one of your colleges has received one penny 
for current expenses since 1930. These institutions cannot 
continue to prosper indefinitely on this basis. We must pay 
Our debts and liberate with adequate financial support these 
institutions to meet the needs of a new day. 
Respectfully submitted, 

D. P. MARSHBANKS. 



iReport on Baptist Hospital 

Mrs. W. E. Nichols prepared the report but it was read by 
G. Scott Turner. The report was discussed by Supt. Smith Hag- 
aman of Winston-Salem. The report was adopted. 
REPORT ON BAPTIST HOSPITALS 

In the brief years of its history our Baptist Hospital at Winston- 
Salem has grown to be one of the leading Baptist Hospitals in the 
South. Its management, doctors and nurses are of the very highest 
type of cultured, refined Christian men and women who are untiring 
in their efforts to serve both the individual and the hospital to the best 
of their ability. 

Since the Hospital was opened in 1923 a little more than 33,000 pa- 
tients have entered for treatment. This year it has served around 4,000 
patients, of this number one-half will be part pay and free patients. 
At the present rate 19,932 part pay and free days, or 1,458 free and 
part pay patients. With the present capacity there can be no increase, 
as they are running as full as possible. There was received from the 

10 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Duke endowment last year a little more than $14,000.00. Apart from 
this the hospital is entirely dependent upon the Churches and Sunday 
Schools; through the Mother's Day offerings for the hospitalization 
of these vast numbers of free and part-pay patients. The rate per day 
is $3.87 to care for a patient in the hospital. 

The women of the State are rendering an exceedingly valuable 
service for the hospital by furnishing linen, such as sheets, towels, 
pillow cases, tray covers, etc. 

Let us not foget the words of the Lord Jesus when He said "In 
as much as ye have done it unto one of the least of these ye have done 
it unto me." 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. W. E. NICHOLS. 



Report on Old Ministers Relief 

This report was read by Mrs. D. B. Andrews and discussed 
by Rev. J. E. Ayscue. Report was adopted. 

REPORT ON OLD MINISTERS' RELIEF 



The work of the Relief and Annuity Board of the Southern Bap- 
tist Convention, located at Dallas, Texas, should find a large place in 
the thought and concern of every Baptist in the South. We should make 
it a matter of prayer, of study, and of united effort. The board con- 
tinually faces the great task laid upon it by Southern Baptists of pro- 
viding food, clothing and shelter for thousands of ministers who have 
grown old in the service of Christ, and of the widows of ministers who 
have gone to their Heavenly home. The need of these servants of our 
Lord, as they face the sunset of life, makes a mute appeal to the gen- 
erosity of our churches that should find quick and practical response. 
The Relief and Annuity Board is now asking that a special "Fel- 
lowship Offering" be taken at least once a year in connection with 
the observance of the Lord's supper. This offering will be in addition 
to their regular contributions and should be marked, "Special Fellow- 
ship Offering for Ministerial Relief." If many of our churches will 
take this offering, the Relief and Annuity B'oard will be able to send 
thousands of dollars more money to these aged and dependent veter- 
ans. Already three millions of dollars in benefits have been paid to 
aged ministers and widows, but vastly more needs to be done. 

Time and again, God said to Israel, 'Take heed to thyself that 
thou forsake not the Levite as long as thou livest upon the earth." 
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet. 
Lest we forget! Lest we forget! 

Respectfully submitted, 
MRS. D. B. ANDREWS. 
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LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



The Tuesday afternoon session came to a close with prayer 
by Dr. I. M. Mercer. 

Tuesday Night Eeslsion 

The congregation sang: "My Jesus I Love Thee." Rev. 
John Ousley conducted the devotional using as a subject: "Plac- 
ing God's Kingdom First." 

Report on B. T. U. 

This report was read by Miss Mamie Haighwood and dis- 
cus's by Truby Powell using as a subject "They stood every man 
in his place." The Senior Union of Antioch Baptist Church 
gave a Playlet emphasizing the importance of B. T. U. work. 
The report was adopted. E. E. Morgan of Lexington led in prayer 
for our B. T. U. organizations. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 



Through the past year there have been maintained in the Asso- 
ciation: Eight general organizations; four adult, twelve senior, five 
intermediate, eight junior and two story-hour organizations of B. T. 
U. in twelve of our churches. All of them have been and are now ac- 
tive, and they report increasing enrollments. Eleven workers sent to 
Ridgecrest July 3rd and 4th to attend the Associational Leaders' Con- 
ferences. 

Last year's report showed that fourteen of the twenty-four church- 
es in our Association had regularly organized and working E'. T. Un- 
ions, and our report now shows only twelve Unions. But we feel 
that we are not really losing ground if all our workers, with the co- 
operation of all church members, cling closely to and are inspired by 
our theme: Faith, is the Victory. 

In many of our District meetings we have witnessed the eager 
enthusiasm with which young people take up the work assigned to 
them, and the conscientious effort they put into it inspires us to great- 
er hope that our adult church members will offer more encourage- 
ment to them than they have in the past. 

Witli the firm conviction that the training of our young people 
in Christian endeavor that includes all phases of church work, we 
urge that all pastors, parents and others who exert influence over 
our young people be more alert to the opportunity afforded through 
this branch of religious effort to bring all young Christians into the 
ranks of trained "doers of the Word." 

Our suggestion would be — and we offer it with the sincere hope 
that it will have serious consideration by every member of every one 
of our churches — that especial attention be given at all times to plans 

12 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



for inducing" young people to become active in church work. If we may 
have this cooperation, the B. T. U. is ready and willing to assist in 
training them for the tasks which the church offers. 

To those churches which have no organization of B. T. U. we sug- 
gest that pastors immediately consult with parents in order that in- 
terest in the work may have its beginning in the home. With that 
much accomplished, we feel sure there will be fewer churches without 
B. T. U. organizations, because it has been found that when this phase 
of church work is sponsored by pastors and parents, a strong, work- 
ing union is the happy result. 

We are emphasizing the importance of cooperation because we 
are convinced that with it the influence of the B. T. U. will be felt 
more strongly than ever before. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAMIE HAIGHWOOD. 



Rev. J. C. Powell, our Missionary to Africa, brought a most 
helpful message on * The Great Commission — Go Ye". The Clos- 
ing prayer was offered by Rev. C. B. Howard. 

oOo 

Wednesday Morning Session 

**0 Worship the King" was sung by the congregation after 
which Rev. W. H. Poole conducted the devotional reading a 
part of the 6th chapter of 2 Corinthians. 

Report on Woman's Work 

Mrs. J. C. Jones read the report for Mrs. E. N. Gardner. 

Mrs. Jones mentioned some of the outstanding accomplish- 
ments of the W. M. U. of the Dunn Church. Mrs. J. G. Layton 
for the Lillington Church; Mrs. R. I. Latter for Chalybeate 
Springs; Mrs. Harvey O'Quinn for Antioch; Mrs. R. F. Hall for 
Friendship; Rev. W. H. Poole for Harmony; Rev. E. N. Gardner 
for Dunn R. A's. Rev. G. Scott Turner addressed the body on 
"Key bearers of the Kingdom of Heaven." Report adopted. 

REPORT ON WOMEN'S WORK 



To the Little River Association, Lillington, N. C, October 27, 28, 1936. 
Since the days of Jesus' sojourn on earth, women whose hearts 
burned with loving- gratitude for His exceeding precious gifts to wo- 
manhood have rejoiced to serve Him. Southern Baptist women have 
found their peculiar avenue of service since 1888 in Woman's Mission- 
ary Union, a group that year organized auxiliary to the Southern Bap- 



13 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



tist Convention, "to elicit, combine and direct" the missionary efforts 
and gifts of the many little women's mission bands, and to educate 
Baptist women in missionary knowledge. Two years before this, the 
first Sunbeam Band had been organized; and in the years since, new 
organizations have grown up until now W. M. U. has seven graded or- 
ganizations to enlist the mssionary activities of all our Baptist fam- 
ily from childhood to early manhood, and throughout the life of our 
women. 

The aims of all these organizations, variously stated, are five: pray- 
er, Bible study, mission study, personal service, stewardship; to which 
the women add the missionary education of young people. Along this 
six-fold path Woman's Missionary Union advances steadily through 
the years to greater devotion and larger service. 

For 1938, our Jubilee year, plans are being made which shall 
signalize this occasion with celebrations of various fitting kinds, 
with special gifts to mark our gratitude and devotion. 

The Southside W. M. U. is organized by states; the North Caro- 
lina W. M. U. by five Divisions; the Wilmington Division by ten Asso- 
ciatons, of whch the Little River W. M. U. is one. Our own Associa- 
tional work has been blessed in many ways in 1936. Ten new organ- 
izations, including one W. M. S., have been added to our rolls, making 
a total of 58. Our 1935 gift totalled $2836.67, and our aim for 1936 is 
12960.00, which we are confident of reaching through the combined 
efforts of all our women and young people, climaxed by our Lottie 
Moon Christmas Offering. 

Though we feel great encouragement at an increased interest, we 
long to see the day when all our women and all our yOung people 
shall be actively engaged in missionary service through our missionary 
organizations. We plead with the pastors and people of those churches 
with no missionary organizations to lose no time in uniting for ser- 
vice in this most effective way. Surely anyone who could have heard 
our young people — 14, representing 6 churches of our Association — 
competing in our most successful Stewardship Contest, would have 
realized how much this missionary training is meaning to them. The 
fact that three of our competitors won also in the Divisional Contest 
is of much less importance than the knowledge and inspiration all the 
young people gained. More of this sort of training, more organized 
and steady effort to learn about and support the world enterprise of 
Christ Jesus, will help us to enter into our task as His servants. 

A statistical table of women's work accompanies this report. 
Respectfully submitted, 

RUTH C. GARDNER. 



Report on State Missions 

Read by Rev. Paul Childress. 

14 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



REPORT ON STATE MISSIONS 



During: the year, the Lord has blessed the work of the State Mis- 
sion Board. In addition to supporting seventy Missionary Pastors 
serving 150 Churches, this Board has stimulated interest in 173 Train- 
ing Schools, encouraged 164 Revival Meetings, which resulted in 1,381 
conversions and 957 baptisms. 

Our State Mission Board is by no means an inactive organization. 
Last year our seventy Missionary Pastors preached 6,482 sermons, 
made 15,102 vsits and repaired or built 55 churches at a cost of $11,- 
972.78.. 

We are grateful to report the work among the RobesOn County 
Indians and record our appreciation of the splendid work of Rev. and 
Mrs. C. M. Lunsford. It is also a great pleasure to bring you glad tid- 
ings of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Fitzgerald of Cherokee. "Looking back ov- 
er six months of labor" Mrs. Fitzgerald says, "We can thank God and 
take courage." 

The State Mission work among our colored brothers has Deen 
most effective. A few years ago the Board was authorized to make an 
appropriation sufficient to cover at least one half the salary of an able 
man from the General State Convention, which is the name of the Ne- 
gro State Convention. The General State Convention suggested Bro- 
therW. C. Somerville, and we record with pleasure the good work done 
in establishing confidence among our churches, developing good will 
and fellowship, and building up a steady support of the object for 
which our convention stands. 

A very aggressive jirogram of the Sunday School Department con- 
tinues under the vigorous and consecrated leadership of L. L. Morgan. 
We call attention to the glorious accomplishments of our Sunday 
School Revivals, which have contributed so much in giving us better 
trained workers. 

We regret the loss of Miss Rickett in our B. T. U. department, but 
record with pleasure the far-reaching service of Miss Starnes. Your 
attention is called especially to the increase in the number of unions, 
to the emphasis which is being placed upon the study of missions by 
our young people and upon the use of religious literature. Our young 
people deserve the best; and we believe they are getting it. 

Our Student work offers us a great challenge; Thousands of young 
men and women from all parts of the world come to our colleges and 
we need to minister to their spiritual needs. Miss Clee Mitchell remains 
sole full-time representative among the thousands of students in the 
colleges. She needs to give her full time at Greensboro, and we need 
greatly to place a full-time representative at Boone and at Duke. 

15 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



During the year Mr. W. Percy Crouch has been assigned to gen- 
eral supervision of all Religious Education activities in the state, and 
we gratefully record the good work done under his leadership. 

The outlook for our State Mission Board is a bright one. Since 
1933 we have been on the incline rather than the decline, and we proud- 
ly review this situation, but let us not forget the great task that lies 
before us, and may we not leave this work to Brother Alexander, or 
Brother Somerville but may each of us realize we have a part, yes a 
great part in this great program for the Master. 

PAUL CHILDERS. 



Report on Home Missions 

Read by W. M. Thomas. 

REPORT ON HOME MISSIONS 



The North Carolina Baptist Annual of 1935 gives a short defini- 
tion of Home Missions as "the denomination as a whole taking the 
gospel in all its fullness to the people of the homeland, Cuba and 
Panama." 

According to the report given in the North Carolina Baptist An- 
nual of 1935.: "There are about 250 missionaries and workers in the 
sanatorium, schools and goodwill centers. There are 598 mission sta- 
tions maintained, 5 goodwill centers, 2 rescue missions, a seaman's 
institute; 29 schools are operated by Home missionaries in Panama, 
Cuba and the Homeland. Property is furnished for 8 mountain schools 
free of charge to local boards of trustees. A tubercular sanatorium in 
El Paso, Texas, is being successfully operated. A building and loan de- 
partment has loaned nearly one and one-quarter millions to churches. 
During the past year this Board has conducted its enlarging work with- 
out borrowing a penny for operating expenses and has paid off a sub- 
stantial amount of its indebtedness. Last year the Home Mission 
Board placed 36 new missionaries in the field and opened 76 new mis- 
sions. E'at best of all is the record of 3,740 conversions and baptisms 
during the past year." 

This report is indeed encouraging, but we must not become negli- 
gent or forgetful of the work we have to do." The population of the 
South has increased two and a half million during the past five years. 
Gains in all religious faiths have only increased one and one-third 
million during the same period." In other words all religious faiths to- 
gether evangelized a little more than half of the increase in population 
during that period. "Today there are over 24 million unchurched peo- 
ple in the South." Let us continue to be evangelistic. Surely we will 
not wait for the report of the missionaries, but instead we will have 

16 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



a report in our own churches revealing the fact that the gospel has 
gone forward, and that the kngdom of God is coming into the hearts 
of men. "We can do all things in Him that strengtheneth us. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. M. THOMAS 



Report on Foreign Missions 

Mrs. George Britton read the report for Mrs. Geo. T. Noel. 
REPORT ON. FOREIGN MISSIO'NS 



Ninety-one years ago the foreign mission enterprise of Southern 
Baptists was launched, and the support of our first missionary, J. Lew- 
is Shuck of China, undertaken. Since that day our missionary impulse 
and world task have grown like a swelling stream; today we have 400 
missionaries, working in Africa, Argentina, Brazil, China, Italy, Mexi- 
co, Chile, Hungary, Rumania, Jugo-Slavia, Spain, Palestine and Syria. 
Our mission work may be classified under three heads: evangelism, 
educational (including schools and publishing work) and medical: 
and quite aside from the uncountable investment in lives, represents 
a property and institutional stake of mutiplied thousands of dollars. 

This most important of Southern Baptist enterprises is adminis- 
tered wisely and with far-sighted vision by our Foreign Mission Board, 
with offices in Richmond, Virginia. Through the changing years they 
have adapted methods to meet conditions, ever giving "an abiding Gos- 
pel to a changing world." During the past few years several far- 
reaching changes have been inaugurated: notably the appointment 
of three veteran missionaries to have the oversight of work in the 
Orient, Latin America and Nigeria, and a general policy of drawing 
the fields and the homeland closer together. Our Executive Secretary 
Dr. Maddry, has recently visited every field except Nigeria. 

Partly because of the encouragement brought by him, and in spite 
of hardships, every field except Italy last year was able to make a 
bouyantly hopeful report of what God hath wrought. The great need 
Is support fromi the homeland — by gifts and by prayers. As we 
enter more and more deeply into the wisely adopted policy of invest- 
ing more in the training of native leaders, we at home will have the 
joy of investing more and more in the lives of our brothers and sisters 
of other races, and we may do this by increased support of our own 
Seminaries and Training School where at present Christians from 
China, Japan and Europe are in training with our own young people, 
and very soOn choice students from other mission fields will join them. 
Surely this is bringin our Foreign Board close home! 

Are we availing ourselves of our privilege as servants of Christ 
to have a part in this work ? Last year our Association reported a gift 

17 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



for all causes except our own local work, from our 6529 members, of 
$6745.73, or slightly over one dollar per member for the year. May 
God enlarge our vision, our hearts and our devotion to Him, that in 
the year, and the years to come, we may enter into the meaning of be- 
ing good stewards of the Gospel of Christ! 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mrs. George T. Noel, (Com.) 



The reports on State, Home, and Foreign Missions were 
discussed by M. A. Huggins, General Secretary of the Baptist 
State Convention. 

Reports were adopted. 

Rev. N. M. Wright, pastor of Lillington Methodist Church 
led in prayer. 

Rev. C. B. Howard made his final report on "The State of 
the Churches''. The report is found elsewhere in the minutes. 

On motion, Rev. J. M. Page of Raleigh, a representative of the 
"United Dry Forces" delivered a most stirring address on Tem- 
perance. 

The report on Temperance was read later. 

A collection of $8.84 was received for the United Dry Forces. 

Rev. S. A. Rhyne offered the closing prayer. 

Adjournment for dinner. 

oOo 

Wednesday Afternoon Session 

Rev. Julius Holloway conducted the devotional, emphasiz- 
ing Prayer, Bible Study, Church Attendance and Giving. 
Report on Sunday Schools 

Read by G. G. Page. The report was discussed by G. G. 
Page and Miss Neva Harper. Report adopted. 

REPORT ON SUNDAY SCHOOLS 



The Sunday school work of the association is going forward 
in many respects but is not making the progress necessary to reach, 
teach and win all people within our bounds. With the coming of 
Dr. T. L. Holcomb to our Sunday School Board at Nashville succeeding 
Dr. Van Ness as executive secretary, many changes were made in the 
entire Sunday School structure. The department of Daily Vacation 
Bible Schools headed by Dr. T. L. Grice was made a department of the 

18 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Sunday School work. The associational Sunday School organizations 
throughout the south were asked to reorganize on the department 
basis. 

In line with the convention plan your Sunday School force was en- 
larged accordingly. Leaders for the various departments were ap- 
pointed as follows: Adult department, George Graham; Young Peo- 
ple's department, Truby Powell; Intermediate department, Mrs. L. E. 
Daley; Junior department, Mrs. R. A. Duncan; Primary department, 
Miss Mamie Haighwood; Beginner department, Mrs. Alton Johnson; 
Cradle Roll department, Mrs. Beulah Gaddy; Home and Extension de- 
partment, Mrs. T. T. Lanear; The word (Daily) has been dropped from 
the Vacation Bible School department and Miss Harper heads the de- 
partment. Mrs. C. D. Bain has general oversight of all the elementary 
grades. Otha Hilliard is associate superintendent and in charge of 
training work and Miss Mamie Haighwood, sec'y-treas. The associa- 
tion still recognizes the group divisions as before with the following 
Group Superintendents: Eastern Group, William Morgan; Western 
Group, Miss Zula Rogers; Central Group, W. E. Medlin. 

A monumental task with corresponding opportunity confronts 
our Sunday School forces as indicated by the following figures: 
Total church members 6482, 1115 of these are listed as non-resident, 
leaving 5367 church members living within actual reach of our church- 
es; 2998 of these church members are enrolled in our Sunday schools 
while 2369 are not enrolled; the average attendance is just about half 
the enrollment; thus we have about 1500 church members in our Sun- 
day schools each Sunday morning with about 3800 members of Our 
Baptist churches on the outside with another 1100 non-resident mem- 
bers we know nothing about. Our first task is to enroll these 3800 and 
secure better attendance from all. 

Our total Sunday school enrollment is about 4938. Of these 1950 
are not church members. Some of these are small children but many 
of them are evangelistic possibilities and present our officers and 
teachers with an unparalleled opportunity for soul winning. Moreover, 
there are four or five thousand other unsaved people within our as- 
sociation who are not reached by any Sunday School. 

Your committee recommends that the present form of organiza- 
tion be approved by our association and that your Sunday School su- 
perintendent for the ensuing year be empowered to complete the or- 
ganization in accordance with the convention plan and allowed to 
make any changes that the Sunday School Board at Nashville may sug- 
gest during the year. We call upon all the members of our churches 
to align themselves more completely with our Sunday School work in 
all its departments. 

We further recommend that all our churches cooperate with Miss 



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LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Neva Harper in putting on an increased number of Vacation Bible 
schools next summer. Seven of our churches had these schools last 
summer with splendid results. Miss Harper is making a supplemental 
report covering this phase of our work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. G. Page 
Associational Sunday School Superintendent 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT ON VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 



The following churches had Vacation Bible Schools: Angier, 
Antioch, Buie's Creek, Coats, Dunn, Lillington and Neill's Creek, with 
a total enrollment of 929 including teachers and pupils. The average 
days was 8 1-7 per school and the total cost to the churches averaged 
per church $11.01, which was spent for literature, equipment, picnic 
and refreshments. Sunday School Board at Nashville provided the 
workers at a cost of a dollar per day. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Neva Harper, 
Director of Vacation Bible Schools of the Sunday School Dept. 

Rev. R. F. Hall read the report on Temperance for H. Paul 
Strickland. 



TEMPERANCE AND PUBLIC MORALS 



Let us consider briefly the temperance question as it relates to 
the State of North Carolina. In our State prior to 1908, various plans 
were tried in an attempt to control the liquor traffic and reduce to 
a minimum the use of intoxicating beverages. None of these plans 
were successful, consequently, on May 27, 1908, the people of our 
State voted in favor of State wide Prohibition by a majority of 44,196. 
Though our prohibition laws were never enforced perfectly, yet in-so- 
far as the evils of liquor are concerned, conditions in North Carolina 
were better under the state-wide prohibition system than they have 
been since the Eighteenth Amendment was repealed, since the sale of 
beer and wine were legalized, and since liquor stores have been es- 
tablished in certain counties in Eastern North Carolina, and in spite 
of the imperfection in our enforcement of prohibition, it is my opinion, 
that our people still believe that absolute prohibition is the best 
method for handling the liquor problem, because on November 7, 1933 
when they had another opportunity to express their wishes in voting 
On the Eighteenth Amendment to the Federal Constitution, the citizens 
of North Carolina re-affirmed their approval of prohibition by a major- 

20 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



ity of 184,572. There are many things happening in North Carolina 
which would cause us to believe that there is an increase in drinking 
since the repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment, and the sale of beer 
and wine has been made legal in all parts of the state, and the sale of 
whiskey made legal in certain counties in the Eastern part of the 
State, for we find the number of automobile accidents are on the in- 
crease, the number of convictions for operating automobiles under the 
Influence of whiskey has greatly increased, and during less than 
a year of the operation of our drivers' license law, we find that more 
than 6,000 people have had their licenses revoked and a large majority 
of them have been convicted of driving automobiles under the influence 
of whiskey. Besides the physical, social and moral injuries resulting 
from the drinking of liquors, we are told that liquor stores have sold 
approximately three million dollars worth of whiskey. We can easily 
see how much good this amount of money could have done if it had 
been wisely spent. 

In conclusion, we as Christians should use our influence in urging 
the legislature of our State which soon will be in session to repeal 
the acts enacted in 1933 and 1935 permitting the sale of beer and 
wines, that prohibition be restored as the state-wide policy in North 
Carolina, and that prohibition as a state-wide policy be not abandoned 
in North Carolina until and unless the people in the state-wide refer- 
endum do vote to legalize the manufacture and sale of intoxicating 
liquors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. Paul Strickland 



The report was discussed by J. M. Page, R. F. Hall, D. H. 
Senter and Miss Lizzie Jones. Report adopted. 

Rev. G. Scott Turner offered the following resolution : 

1. That the clerk be instructed to have minutes printed and dis- 
tributed among the churches. 

2. That the clerk be given authority to abridge reports. 

3. That the clerk be remunerated to the amount of $25.00 for his 
services. 

4. That a committee be appointed to seek funds from churches 
that have not made contribution to the minute fund and, if neces- 
sary additional funds from all churches. 

Resolution was adopted. 

Report on Obituaries 

Read by Rev. Otha Milliard. 

21 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



REPORT ON OBITUARIES 



May we, as we pause for a moment in honor and memory of our 
friends who have gone home during the past year, be inspired by their 
love and faithfulness to their home, community, church and God, 
And, as we catch the torch, thrown to us by them, may we hold it 
high and with renewed zeal and courage go forward to do and dare 
for Him who "doeth all things well" and is able to bear us up in the 
most trying hours. 

"Our friends may die and leave our hearts and homes desolate for 
a time; we cannot prevent it, nor would it be best if we could. Death 
is the gate that opens out of earth toward the house "eternal in the 
heavens." If we lose them, heaven gains them. If we mourn, they 
rejoice. If we hang our harps on the willows, they tune theirs in the 
eternal orchestra above. Shall we not drown our .sorrows in the 
flood of light let through the rent veil of the skies which Jesus enter- 
ed?" 

Let us not think of having ''lost" our friends and loved ones, but 
as their having "gone before." 

"They never quite leave us, our friends who have passed 
Through the shadows of death to the sunlight above; 
A thousand sweet memories are holding them fast 

To the places they blessed with their presence and love. 
The work which they left and the books which they read 

Speak mutely, though still with an eloquence rare, 
And the songs that they sang, the words that they said. 

Yet linger and sigh on the desolate air " 

Respectfully submitted, 

Otha Hilliard 



As a final feature of the Sixty-First Annual Session of the 
Little River Association, Dr. Carlyle Campbell brought a clos- 
ing meditation from the 5th chapter of St. Luke: "Launch out 
into the deep and let down your nets." 

Bro. Owen Odum offered the closing prayer. 

The Little River Association adjourned to meet with the 
Rawls Baptist Church next year, October 26-27, 1937. 

E. N. Gardner, Moderator. 

R. F. Hall, Clerk-Treasurer. 

oOo 

22 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 





I 


OUR HOME GOERS 1 


ANGIER 


DUNN 


Mrs. Lewis Parrish 


Mrs. J. G. Gulp 


ANTIOC'H 


Mrs. Alexander Draughon 


W. J. Patterson 


Mrs. G. R. Jones 


Mrs. Margaret L. Salmon 


Mrs. Jessie B. Lee 


J. R. Davis 


Mrs. Esther McLeod 


D. A. Patterson 


R. G. Taylor, Sr. 


Mrs. Winnie Black 


Almond Westbrook 

TTl T~» TTTTXT 


Mrs. Pensie Stewart 


ERWIN 


Herbert Wade 


Mrs. Joe Bryant 




HOLLY SPRINGS 


BETHEL 


Miss Opal Patterson 


Mrs. Armanda ElmOre 


KENNEBEC 


BROADWAY 


Mrs. Healon Smith 


J. W. Gunter 


Mrs. Mary McLeon 


BUTE'S CREEK 


Mrs. Lena Johnson 


Mrs. N. I. Reardon 


Mrs. Lon V. Dudley 


Mrs. Rena Stewart 


LILLINGTON 


Mrs. H. C. Barker 


W. F. Hockaday, Sr. 


R. B. Whitlowe 


MACEDONIA 




Mrs. M. J. Weathers 


CHALYBEATE SPRINGE 


PINEY GROVE 


Mrs. Sallie Graddy 
Mrs. Julia F. Smith 


Edward F. Scarborough 
J. L. Wood 


Mrs. L. B. Smith 


Mrs. Mary R. Wood 


COATS 


Mrs. Rosa L. Weatherspoon 


Mrs. J. E. Link 


Mrs. Lula H. Oliver 


David Byrd 


SWANN'S STATION 


CUMBERLAND UNION 


D. A. Graham 


Jacob Coopper 


Mrs. Phoebia Cox 



23 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

OF THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

ERWIN BAPTIST CHURCH, AUGUST 26, 1936 

THEME— THY KINGDOM COME 

10:00— Hymn— "0 Kin^ Eternal" 

"Watchwords were repeated in unison. The devotional was led by 
Mrs. Paul Bradley, who used John 20:21 as the basis for her remarks 
on Interpreters of Christ. 

Prayer by Mrs. Edna R. Harris. 

Greetings from the local church, Mrs. G. W. Florence. Response, 
Mrs. I. L. Howell of the Piney Grove W. M. S. Adoption of the printed 
program as the order of business. 

Report and recommendations. 

E'ringing in the Kingdom through Personal Service, Mrs. Allen 
Shaw. 

A demonstration was rendered to give some idea of the work done 
by each auxiliary. 

Bringing in the Kingdom through Mission Study, Mrs. C. E. 
Rayford. 

Attention was called to the fine collection of Mission Study books 
made by Mr. Turner, the pastor. 

The Training School as an agent of the Kingdom, Miss Mattie 
Bain. A most interesting poster was shown and a nephew of Mrs. C. 
E. Woody, bore testimony of her love for the Training School in its 
beginning. 

Report of the Margarett Fund, Mrs. G. T. Noel. Regrets were ex- 
pressed that Miss Mary Fay McMillian, a Margarett Fund Student, 
could not be present. 

Special music. Friendship W. M. S. 
Roll call and reports of societies. 

All the societies were well represented in person except Broad- 
way and Baptist Chapel. A written report from Baptist Chapel was 
read. 

Superintendent's report, Mrs. E. X. Gardner. 

Recognition of visitors. Rev. J. C. Powell, Mr. McKeever, Mes- 
dames W. C. Royall, Hale Herring, A. P. Kutz, Edna R. Harris, Mc- 
Guggan and Miss Macy Cox. 

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES 
Committee on Nominations 
Mrs. L. A. Johnson, Mrs. C. E. Rayford, Mrs. A. S. Wagstaff, Mrs. 
J. A. Buchanan, Mrs. R. I. Latta. 

Committee on Time and Place 

Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks, Mrs. Carl Stewart, Mrs. T. A. Thornton 

Resolution Committee 

Mrs. C. B. Howard, Mrs. R. A. Dunn, Mrs. W. B. Currin 

24 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Reading- of the proposed Constitution. — Adopted. 
Reading of the By-laws. — An amendment was proposed by Mrs. 
Durham Taylor that the nominating committee be appointed a month 
ahead of the meeting. Amendment adopted. By-laws with the 
amendment adopted. 

Missionary address — Rev. J. C. Powell, Africa, a most enlighten- 
ing and interesting talk on the missionary women in Africa, especially 
along educational lines was enjoyed as Mr. Powell told of the growth 
of missions in Africa. 

Mr. Turner called our attention to the bookroom and our leader 
reminded us to register, to look at the exihbits and posters. 

Prayer was made for the missionaries of our prayer calendar and 
association by Dr. L. E. M. Freeman. Lunch. 

Afternoon Session 
Music. Devotional led by Mrs. Chas. Howard on the thought ''Sent 
to Serve". 

Minutes of the morning read and approved. 
Kingdom Builders in the Wilmington Dvision, Miss Macy Cox. 
Stewardship's Place in E'ringing in the Kingdom, Mrs. D. D. 
Overby. 

In the poster contest, Buie's Creek was the winner and received 
the books. As good stewards we should interest ourselves in Tithers 
Bonds. The Declamation Contest, In securing a gift from every 
member. Intercessory prayer for more tithers. Join the 100 Thousand 
Club. To this end a playlet by Mrs. Carter Wright may be used. 
Kingdom Builders in North Carolina, Mrs. Edna R. Harris. 
A bit of history as to the beginning of our Kingdom Building in 
North Carolina was most interesting and thought provoking. 

The report of the Nominating Committee was read and adopted. 
The report on Time and Place was read — Antioch was selected 
as th;e place and an amendment that we meet after the 2nd Sunday in 
September was adopted. Report adopted. 

The report of the Resolution Committee as presented by Mrs. R. 
A. Duncan was unanimously adopted. 
Recognition of the Young People. 

Snging "Jesus Wants Me For A Sunbeam", by the Sunbeams. 
Sunbeam Beginnings, Mr. G. T. Noel, a member of the first 
Sunbeam Band in Virginia as organized by Dr. George B. Taylor. 
Presentation of the Divisional Stewardship Contest winners. 
Kingdom Building with and for Young People, Mrs. G. T. Noel. 
Some pointers — 

State R. A. Conclave 
Year Book 

Conferences with Leaders 
Trained Counsellors 
Personal Service 

25 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Our Colleg-e Y. W. A., Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks. 

We were challenged to give the young people something construc- 
tive to do since they were daring, responsive, and capable of achieving 
because of their knowledge, courage and convictions. 

Miss Cox reminded us of our two divisional meetings and voiced 
her appreciation to the Buie's Creek Society for the fine help they had 
rendered a student. 

Announcements made Mrs. E. N'. Gardner. 

Third quarterly reports. 

Week of prayer for September. 

Royal Ambassadors Conclave. 

Associational Expense Fund collected was $10.90. We were re- 
minded to send in five cents per member at an early date. 

Reading of the minutes of the afternoon service. Adopted. 

The Memorial, submitted by Mrs. James A. Buchanan was read 
by the Secretary as we all stood with clasped hands and bowed heads. 

Adjourned. 



26 



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C<lf'*li5COt-C>0O5o 



STATE OF CHURCHES 



CHIJRCH 



C3 



1. Angler 

2 . Broadway 

3.Antioch 

4. Baptist Chapel 

5. Baptist Grove 

e.Belliel 

7.Buie's Creelv 

8. Chalybeate Springs 

9 . Coats 

10. Cumberland Union . 

11. Dunn 

12.Erwin 

13 . Friendship 

14. Harmony 

15. Holly Springs 

16 . Kennebec 

17.L,illington 

18. Macedonia 

19.Neiirs Creek 

20. Oak Grove 

21.Piney Crove 

22. Pleasant Memorv ,. 

23.Rawls " 

24.Swann's Station ... 

Totals 



316| 

95| 
5161 
108| 
2291 

67| 
489| 
437| 
251| 
1101 
6491 
450 1 
271| 
1511 
402| 
125| 
270| 
2761 
238l| 
12,SJ 
5701 

311. 

1641 

161| 

6187] 



251 225 

31 64 

42| 489 

6| 60 

13| 186| 

3| 60|. 

30J €09 1 

21 382| 

8| 172| 

111 90|. 

26| 6161 

36| 5761 

12| 1711 

101 1401. 

10| 2961 

111 95|. 

7 216 

27| 151 

8| 153 

101 97 

16' 265 

...I 371 

7] 1451 

81 139 1 

336 54341 



28 


108 


1265.94 


16 


16 


440.00 


44 


60 


1274.93 




11 


164.00 


23 

... 


.... 




470.65 
50.00 


256 


170 


2314.03 


35 


82 


1189.47 


25 


37 
.... 


494.77 
129.00 


60 


268 


9973.91 


581 157 


1989.74 


211 38 


581.99 


... 


15 


632.90 


671 


107 


710.25 




.... 


229.56 


52 


117 


3112.44 
325.97 
538.40 


84 


10 






50.00 




67 


594.23 
110.25 


26 




296.00 


20 


.... 


296. :50 


815 


1263 


27074.58 



6881861 

115.861 

355.351 

30.501 

74.191 

10.41J 

1165.331 

475.501 

267.091 

31.131 

3328.1-71 

349.431 

110.941 

36.171 

316.22] 

11.251 

650.391 

37.781 

93.331 

9.00|, 

172.681 

1.00|. 

20.571 

56.471 

8375.551 



141 

69, 

37 

5, 

28 

2, 

200 

133. 

60. 

10. 

699. 

166 

12 

1. 

61 

3 

60. 

22 

25. 



45! 1954 
861 555 
731 1630 
501 194 
55| 544 
1501 60 
OOT 3479 
30[ 1664 
11! 761 
00] 160 
27113302, 
'50] 2339 
031 692 
00^ 669 
731 1026 
751 240 



,80 6.18 
,86 5.84 
,2813.16 
5011.80 



107.48 



12, 

37. 
1898, 



3762 
363 
631 

■ 59 
766 
111 
316 
352 

35450 



2.38 

.90 

7.11 

.97|3.'8n 
.86|3.03 
.13|1.46 
.18|20.50 
.1715.20 
.9312.56 
.0713.18 
.4712.55 
.81|1.93 
.83|13.93 
.7511.32 
.7312.61 
.00] .46 
.9111.35 
.2513.59 
.57J1.87 
.97 2.19 
.1315.89 



Of total gifts, 76 1-2 per cent used in local churches, 23 3-4 per cent to denomi- 
national work. 1 church had no baptisms during the year. Baptisms increased 104 
this year. 9 churches have no Training Union ; 9 have no W. M. U. Organiza- 
tions ; All have active Sunday Schools ; All contributed to Cooperative Program ; 
Z made no contribution to the Orphanage. Church membership loss 442 (Buie's 
Creek lost 512 revising roll). Sunday School enrollment gain, 533. W. M. U. 
enrollment gains, 501. B. T. U. enrollment gains, about 115. 



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MINUTES 

OF THE 

SIXTY-SECOND ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

NORTH CAROLINA 

HELD WITH 

RAWLS BAPTIST CHURCH 
OCTOBER 26-27, 

19 37 



Prof. Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator.- Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Rev. G. Scott Turner, Vice-Moderator„ Erwin, N. C. 

Rev. R. F. HaU, Clerk-Treasurer Lillington, N. C. 

oOo 



The Next Annual Session Will Be Held With The Baptist 

Grove Baptist Church, Tuesday and Wednesday After 

4th Sunday In October, 1938. 

Rev. R. K. Benfield is to Preach the Annual Sermon. 
Rev. Forrest Young, Alternate. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 

SIXTY-SECOND ANNUAL SESSION 

OF THE 

LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

NORTH CAROLINA 

HELD WITH 

RAWLS BAPTIST CHURCH 
OCTOBER 26-27, 



19 37 



Prof. Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator— Buie's Creek, N. C. 

Rev. G. Scott Turner, Vice-Moderator Erwin, N. C. 

Rev. R. F. Hall, Clerk-Treasurer Lillington, N. C. 

oOo 



The Next Annual Session Will Be Held With The Baptist 

Grove Baptist Church, Tuesday and Wednesday After 

4th Sunday In October, 1938. 

Rev. R. K. Benfield is to Preach the Annual Sermon. 

Rev. Forrest Young, Alternate. 

oOo 



Printed By 

THE RECORD PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Zebulon, North Carolina 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



PROMOTION-EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
1937-38 

L. H. Campbell Chairman 

R. F. Hall Clerk-Treasurer 

All pastors in the Association are members of this commit- 
tee, and the following from the churches: 

Angier Mrs. A. L. Overby, Angier 

Antioch J. C. Bullock, Lillington 

Baptist Chapel J. R. Howard, R. F. D., Jonesboro 

Baptist Grove Aubrey Sexton, Fuquay Springs 

Bethel J. A. West, R. F. D., Manchester 

Buie's Creek Joe H. Stewart, Buie's Creek 

Broadway H. A. Thomas, Broadway 

Chalybeate Springs Early W. Smith, Varina 

Coats Dr. C. G. Fuquay, Coats 

Cumberland Union A. M. Thomas, R. F. D., Varina 

Dunn C. T. McGugan, Dunn 

Erwin Walter Blake, Erwin 

Friendship F. D. Byrd, Bunnlevel 

Harmony J. E. Hayes, Sr., R. F. D. Lillington 

Holly Springs H. Y. Smith, R. F. D., Broadway 

Kennebec M. T. Olive, Willow Springs 

Layton's Chapel Charles Moore, R. F. D., Lillington 

Lillington Mrs. R. F. Hall, Lillington 

Macedonia Ed Holt, Holly Springs 

Neill's Creek Jessie Keith, Lillington 

Oak Grove Leland Matthews, R. F. D. 2, Angier 

Piney Grove W. E. Medlin, Casma 

Pleasant Memory H. L. Cutts, R. F. D., Coats 

Rawls Frank Jones, Fuquay Springs 

Swann's Station George Graham, R. F. D., Jonesboro 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES FOR 1938 

Aged Ministers J. C. Jones, Dunn 

Baptist Training Union Miss Egeta Williams, Angier 

Christian Education H. B. Taylor, Dunn 

Foreign Missions F. L. Young, Coats 

Home Missions H. C. Upchurch, Rawls 

2 



:--. LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION :-: 

Hospitals W. E. Bond, Oak Grove 

Temperance and Public Morals Geo. Graham, Swann's Station 

Orphanage Representative Haywood West, Dunn 

Obituaries H. Y. Smith, Holly Springs 

Religious Literature Henderson Steele, Lillington 

State Missions W. A. Weston, Lillington 

State of Churches Scott Turner, Erwin 

Sunday Schools W. E. Medlin, Piney Grove 

Woman's Work Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks, Buie's Creek 

ACCOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Sunday School Superintendent G. G. Page, Buie's Creek 

Supt. of Evangelism Chas. B. Howard, Buie's Creek 

Educational Director W. A. Weston 

Supts. of Departments as they are at present in set-up of 
Associational S. S. activities. 

ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. OFFICERS 

President — Rev. R. K. Benfield Angier 

Vice-President — ^Truby Powell Lillington 

Sec'y.-Treas.— Miss Mamie Haighwood Lillington 

ASSOCIATIONAL W. M. U. OFFICERS 

Supt. — Mrs. E. N. Gardner Dunn 

Associate Supt. — Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks Buie's Creek 

Sec'y.-Treas. — Mrs. Stephens Dunn 

Young People's — Mrs. R. K. Benfield Angier 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



PROCEEDINGS 

TUESDAY MORNING SESSION 

The sixty-second annual session of the Little River Baptist 
Association convened with the Rawls Baptist Church, Oct. 26-27, 
1937. 

The congregation sang: ''We're Marching To Zion." Rev. 
H. C. Upchurch conducted the devotional using for his theme: 
"Witnessing for Christ in the Home." Rev. R. E. Atkins led in 
prayer. 

RELIGIOUS LITERATURE 

W. M. Thomas read the report on Religious Literature. On 
motion to adopt, the report was discussed by W. M. Thomas, 
Rev. J. M. Page, Rev. W. A. Weston, L. H. Campbell, Mrs. Whit- 
tington. G. R. Wells offered to send the Recorder to any per- 
son in Harnett County not able to pay for same, provided that 
person does not use tobacco, drink liquor, or own a dog. 

for God's day than all other forces combined. Take that day away and 

Ml books, magazines and tracts published mean a lift upward to- 
wards Heaven, or a pull downward towards Hell, John James de- 
clared that he never recovered from the effects of a bad book which 
he read only fifteen minutes. How needful that we concentrate on the 
proper thing — God's word comes first and it should be read daily reg- 
ularly and systematically for around it clusters all literature that is 
worth while. 

A peep into Dr. Watts' hymn book it is said saved Sir Walter 
Scott from suicide. Capt. Cook's voyages led William Gary to be a 
missionary. Adoniram Judson, one of the world's greatest mission- 
aries, was led into the work from New England to Burma, by reading 
a book. 

Parents should guard the literature of their children as they 
guard their food and medicine if they were lingering at death's door. 
What we read either contains the ozone of life on the malaria of death. 
It is either a sweet smelling savor or a stench in our nostrils. 

Many of the most popular magazines of the day lead away from 
God. So-called high class magazines carry more articles unfavorable 
than favorable to Christianity, still we find them largely patronized 
and eagerly read by our church folks. You will find more of them at 
a great deal greater cost in the average home than you will find reli- 
gious literature. 

It is the opinion of some of our most thoughtful people that our 
great Sunday American dailies are doing more to break down respect 

4 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



what have we left? We warn against reading matter that is full of 
deception, obscenity and coarseness of all kind. People feverishly- 
read sensation and will not read that that lifts the soul heavenward 
and then wonder what the unhappiness is all about. Our people should 
not only read, but strive to enlarge the circulation of our Biblical 
Recorder and other denominational publications. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. M. THOMAS. 



STATE MISSIONS 

Mrs. J. G. Layton read the report, and on motion to adopt, 
the report was discussed by Mrs. Layton, who in turn presented 
Rev. M. O. Alexander, our State Missionary. The report was ef- 
fectively discussed by Mrs. Layton and Mr. Alexander. 

" * * * ye shall be witnesses unto me * * * in all Judea * * ". 

North Carolina is our Judea. The State Mission E'oard has from 
its organization stressed evangelism. "To the poor the gospel is 
preached." 

Hundreds of strong and liberal churches of today can trace their 
origin to a small, needy group once nurtured by State missions. At 
present, two field workers. Rev. M. O. Alexander and Rev. J. C. 
Pipes, cover the state. 

Through the church building fund struggling congregations are 
enabled to build comfortable and adequate ''church homes." 

The task of teaching and training was assumed many years ago 
by the State Board. Through the Sunday School Department the 
standard of teaching in Sabbath Schools has been raised and methods 
of administration have been improved. 

The Baptist Training Union is developing Christian workers and 
discovering potential leaders for the denomination. 

The Indians in Robeson County have the gospel presented to 
them by two full time mission workers. Rev. and Mrs. M. C. Lunsford. 

The Baptist State Convention is co-operating with the negro Bap- 
tists by supplementing the salaries of two negro leaders who are 
"rightly dividing the word of truth" to the two hundred fifty thousand 
negroes within our borders. 

Our Board, with aid from other states, makes it possible for Rev. 
Wayne Williams to minister to the war veterans at Oteen hospital. 

Hundreds of young people in educational institutions are being- 
safeguarded at a crucial period in their lives, by Christian counsellors. 

One full-time student secretary. Miss Cleo Mitchell, is located at 
Greensboro. In other educational centers local churches supplement 
the salaries of student counsellors. 

Dr. Hatcher wisely compared State Missions to the granary which 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



supplies the seed corn for sowing- in "the uttermost part of the 
earth." We must make it possible for our State Mission Board to en- 
large its program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAUDE C. LAYTON. 

o 

MODERATOR'S MESSAGE 

To The Little Rive* Association, meeting at the 

Rawls Baptist Church, Oct. 26-27, 1937 

We have come to the close of another year of service we have 
tried to render as Moderator of your body. The work has hardly been 
worthy of particulai- comment; but these are some things we have 
kept before us as objectives for a chief executive of a district associa- 
tion of Baptist churches: A visit to every church in the group early 
in the associational year; extra visits in case of special call or need 
that may arise foi- consultation with leaders or members of the church- 
es; the encouragement of the organized work of the different 
branches of activity carried on by the denomination; and the attempt 
to promote unity and progress throughout the body. During these 
three years we have aimed accordingly; and we have been able to see 
much to rejoice in, although for the past term we come with the con- 
fession that we have failed to visit a few of our twenty-five churches. 

Among the points of emphasis favorable for reporting to this 
session of the body there are three or four we now list. On former 
occasions we have called attention to the need of the Little River of 
having fields with resident pastors, in order that more supervision and 
guidance may be given the congi-egations. We are, therefore, happy to 
report the coming of two new pastors to our midst: W. A. Weston to 
Lillington, and R. K. Benfield to Angier. Furthermore, the presence 
of the recently called pastor of Coats, F. L. Young, who resides just 
across the border at Benson, makes him almost a resident pastor. 
Our churches are supplied with ministers, with the exception of the 
strong rural field of four churches in the western part of the associa- 
tion, composed of E'aptist Chapel, Broadway, Holly Springs and 
Swann's Station, whose pastor has gone to the Seminary. We hope 
they will act unitedly in securing another capable leader. 

The most notable service accomplished in our midst during the 
past year in our judgment was the marvelous development of the Va- 
cation Bible School idea. A year ago Miss Neva Happer opened the 
eyes of our people to the possibility of having these summer schools 
for our children in other churches than town and city. She helped to 
start a greater work for the summer of 1937, was transferred to an- 
other association in North Carolina, and her work placed in the hands 

6 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



of Miss Ruby Williams. In no respect did it suffer; but forged ahead, 
with the report of schools held in 18 of the twenty-five churches, 
with an enrollment of 1827. 

There has been a commendable growth in missionary interest, 
with 9 new societies. Now 18 of th,e churches have at least one mis- 
sionary organization. Some of these are in need of an infusion of life, 
however. We are persuaded that wherever there is a flourishing mis- 
sionary organization, there it will be possible to find a church that is 
advancing in vision and undertaking. We have not observed especial 
development in the association in Baptist Training Union and Sunday 
School activities, although more than one of our churches have recent- 
ly enlarged their educational plants. In a few instances there may be 
exceptions to this statement. 

We observe with delight the reports of increased contributions 
made to the office of our State Mission Board for all mission objects. 
All of our churches give to some of the causes of the denominational 
budget; and most of them are reporting something for the Co-oper- 
ative Program. We are glad the idea of the every member canvass is 
becoming more the custom among our people, and recommend its use 
heartily by all our churches. 

There are two chief recommendations with which we wish to 
bring this report to a close. The first deals with attendance upon de- 
nominational gatherings. There is a distressing lethargy among our 
laymen and many of our v/omen in attendance upon associational, state 
and southwide gatherings, at which untold values of definite informa- 
tion ond enthusiasm may be gained. We should like to see represen- 
tatives of all the churches, in addition to the ministers, at the State 
Convention in Wilmington next monh and at the Southern Baptist 
Convention, which for the first time in many years is scheduled to 
meet close to us in its May meeting at Richmond, Virginia. 

Finally, a word needs to be spoken in measured cadence concern- 
ing the spiritual tone of our people. We have among us some of God's 
best men and women; but their efforts are often weakened by the 
poor spiritual life of many whose names are on the books of our 
churches. Some of them, with regularity, drink intoxicants. Others 
gamble from lucky tickets on coupons and the taking of chances at 
the carnivals that infest our state to margins on the stock exchange. 
Sabbath desecration is appalling on the part of many church mem- 
bers. Immorality among men and women has marred the healthy 
growth of some of our churches. If we really are to grow in grace 
and in usefulness in the work of the Kingdom of God, we must more 
and more dedicate all that we have in purity of life and singleness of 
aim to learn and do the will of our Father which is in heaven. 

Faithfully yours. 



E. NORFLEET GARDNER. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



VISITORS RECOGNIZED 

J. M. Page, M. O. Alexander, L. L. Morgan, Chas. L. Gilles- 
pie, J. A. Easley, Harold Schaly, J. T. Gillespie, John McCrim- 
mon, J. J. Adams. All pastors and Deacons in the Association 
were also recognized. 

On motion the Messengers that were present extended an 
invitation to all members of Baptist churches in the Association 
now present t© join with them in constituting the official body. 

On motion by D. H. Senter, the Clerk was instructed to find 
out whether or not we have a Constitution for the Little River 
Association, and if not, that the Promotion-Executive Commit- 
tee draft one and present it at our next annual meeting. Mr. 
Senter was asked to help locate our Constitution, if we have 
one. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

Prof. Leslie H. Campbell was elected Moderator, Rev. G. 
Scott Turner, Vice-Moderator, and Rev. R. F. Hall was re-elected 
Clerk-Treasurer. 

ANNUAL SERMON 

The congregation sang: "What A Friend We Have In Je- 
sus,'' after which Rev. G. Scott Turner preached the sermon. 
The Scripture was Isaiah 35: The theme: "Dwellers on the 
Misty Flats. ' The speaker pointed the congregation to higher 
ground of Christian living. 

The Moderator appointed the Committee on Time, Place 
and Preacher for the next annual meeting as follows: Wm. 
Morgan, Mrs. Chas. B. Howard, H. Y. Smith. 

Committee on Nominations: D. H. Senter, Mrs. H. W. 
Whittington, Mrs. J. G. Layton. 

Rev. H. C. Upchurch, pastor of Rawls, announced that din- 
ner had been prepared by the ladies of the church, assisted by 
the ladies of Chalybeate Springs Church, and extended a hearty 
welcome to all present to participate. After prayer by C. B. 
Howard the body adjourned for lunch. 

8 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

The congregation sang: **Am I A Soldier of the Cross?" 
Rev. John McCrimmon conducted devotional, using as his 
theme: "Witnessing For Christ in Our Schools." Rev. Gerald 
Motley led in prayer. 

L. L. Morgan, State Sunday School Secretary, spoke for ten 
minutes on Sunday School work. 

FOREIGN MISSIONS 
Mrs. C. K. Smith read the report for Mrs. C. E. Raeford, 
who could not be present. After motion to adopt. Rev. Harold 
Schaley, of Brazil, now a student at Wake Forest, discussed the 
report. He told in a dramatic way of his conversion while in 
Brazil; of how he was persecuted, and of the great joy of being 
a Christian. He seemed to be the happiest person present. An 
offering of $31.40 was received and given Mr. Schaley. 

In 1917 the Foreign Mission Board had a total of 544 missionaries 
on the roll. On April 1st, 1937, there were 56 emeritus missionaries 
on pension and 415 missionaries in the active service of the Board. 
The need for replacements in our missionary ranks is acute, but the 
Board feels that enlargement would not be justified until the regular 
receipts through the Co-operative Program increase. 

The following series of mission study books are being edited and 
published: 

"Palestinian Tapestries" for adults (25c). 

"The Heart of the Levant" for young people and adults (40c). 

"Questing in Galilee" for intermediates (40c). 

"The Village Oven," Owens, for Juniors (25c). 

"The Camel Bell" for Primaries (25c). 

Another new book that has received a hearty welcome into South- 
ern Baptist study circles is ''Europe; Chiist or Chaos," Gill, for 
young people and adults (40c). 

The Sunday School Board will discontinue the publication of 
Home and Foreign Fields with the December, 1937, number. The 
number of subscribers to this splendid magazine has been very small. 
The Foreign Mission Board, feeling that a magazine devoted to our 
Mission work is a necessity, will begin the publication of such a maga- 
zine, to be named "The Commission" which will make its appearance 
January 1, 1938. 

The Japanese invasion of China has brought a crisis to our mis- 
sion work there. It is necessary that many of our missionaries be 
brought to places of safety. The Board has no fund from which to 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



provide for this unexpected expense and Dr. Maddry has made an ap- 
peal to the churches to send a special offering for this purpose. Some 
of our missionaries, however, feel that they are needed in China and 
are willing to stay there at their own risk and if necessary to lay down 
their lives in service for their Chinese brethren. What an inspiration 
their heroism should be to us. 

Many new and inspiring opportunities are open to our Mission 
forces but their needs cannot be met unless there in an increase in our 
gifts corresponding with the returning prosperity of the Southland. 
May God lay anew upon our hearts devotion to this glorious task He 
has entrusted to us. 



CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Prof. L. H. Campbell read the report, and on motion to 
adopt, the report was discussed by Mr. Campbell, who in turn 
presented Dr. J. A. Easley, of Wake Forest. Dr. Easley address- 
ed the body on Christian Education. Rev. C. H. Norris, Rev. J. 
J. Adams and L. L. Morgan also spoke briefly on the subject. 

The Baptist State Convention sponsors two senior colleges — Wake 
Forest for men, and Meredith for women — and three educational ju- 
nior institutions— Chowan, Mars Hill and Campbell. The total assets 
01 these institutions in excess of liabilities amount to nearly eight mil- 
lion GoLars. These institutions enrolled last year more than three 
thousand students. The Baptist State Convention owes for these 
schools a balance of about $800,000, largely on the plant of one. An 
investigation will convince anyone that the exquipment and endowments 
of these colleges are far from uniformly adequate, but at the same 
time that the parent convention has no definite, well-conceived policy 
of maintenance and support. Since 1930 no college has received any 
help from the convention for current support or permanent improve- 
ments, as all money for Christian education has gone on the debt re- 
ferred to above. We are happy to report that the General Board has 
allocated to these schools sums totalling $27,500 for the coming year, 
subject to an anticipated increase in funds for our Co-operative Pro- 
gram. 

There is a grave question in the writer's mind as to whether Bap- 
tists of North Carolina are really educationally minded. A leading 
layman recently lamented the fact that in his large city church no ser- 
mon or address on Christian education had been delivered in many 
years. Another expressed surprise that these colleges, children of the 
Convention should be compelled to beg for bread and clothing. Few 
parents, in my opinion, decide intelligently upon the best college ro 
supply all-round equipment for their children. 

Lack of a wisely-planned adequate program of support for 

10 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Chiistian education unfortunately has produced unjust handicaps up- 
on certain colleges and loss of prestige to our whole Baptist system 
of schools. Fortunately three of your colleges are members of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and are fully 
accredited by this highest standardizing agency. But two of these 
colleges, perhaps just as noble in conception and worthy in service, do 
not enjoy such a standing. Every college operating in the name of 
North Carolina Baptists should have A-1 standing in the society of 
educational institutions. 

If we as Baptists accept Jesus as tlie w^y, the truth, the light of 
mankind; if we hold dear our denominational traditions and integrity, 
how jealously we should safeguard the existence of these institutions 
against heresy and supply them with the physical necessities for an 
abundant life. How shortsighted we should be to starve these preserv- 
ers of our Christian tradition, while serving the more-insistent appeal 
of present needs! 

— 



Adjourned with prayer by Owen Odum. 



TUESDAY NIGHT SESSION 
Congregation sang: "The Way of the Cross Leads Home,'* 
after which Rev. W. E. Bond led the devotional, reading Eph. 
6:10-20. Theme: "Witnessing for Christ in the Community." 

NEW CHURCH— LAYTON^S CHAPEL 
Rev. W. E. Bond read the following petition: 

PETITION TO THE LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Laytons Chapel Baptist Church, October 26, 1937. 
We the members of Layton's Chapel Baptist Church do hereby pe- 
tition your body now in session at Rawls Baptist Church for admis- 
sion as a sister church in the Little River Baptist Association. 
Done in conference this the 26th day of October, 1937. 
J. F. WEST, Church Clerk 
WALTER E. BOND, Pastor. 



The Moderator appointed the Promotion-Executive Commit- 
tee to study this application of Layton's Chapel for membership 
in Little River Association and report later in the session their 
recommendation. 

The Committee reported Wednesday afternoon and Lay- 
ton's Chapel Church was received as a sister church in the Asso- 
ciation. The Moderator extended the hand of fellowship in be- 
half of the Association, to the representatives of this new church, 

11 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



the pastor and Misses Alice and Addie West. They brought with 
them $10.00 for Missions and $3.00 for Minutes. 

REPORT ON BAPTIST TRAINING UNION 

Truby Powell read the report and on motion to adopt led in 
the discussion. Rev. R. K. Benfield brought an able message in 
behalf of B. T. U. work. Others who spoke briefly were: H. C. 
Upchurch, W. E. Bond, John McCrimmon, Julius Holloway and 
Bro. Flowers. 

Compared with the statistical reports of all the other agencies of 
the Kingdom in our Association the Baptist Training Union report be- 
low shows neglect and the need of an Associational-wide B. T. U. 
revival and the awakening of all our churches to a new realization and 
conviction of the importance and indispensable place of the training 
of our leaders and all Christians in "all the duties and privileges of 
church membership" and in effective witnessing for Christ in our 
daily living. 

We are deeply grateful for the splendid co-operation of the 
"faithful few", including our associational officers and every B. T. U. 
worker and member in every local union, who have maintained during 
the year in 12 of our churches one or more training union — 6 B. T. U's., 
3 D. A. U's., 15 Senior B. Y. P. U's., 10 Intermediate, 9 Junior, and 3 
Story Hour — making a total of 39 organizations. We have, at present, 
in 3 of our churches a Baptist Training Union with all the departments 
organized and functioning; but we should not forget our 12 churches 
which have no t.aining program. Think of it, in all our churches, 
We have Sunday Schools, but in half our churches in this association 
we have no training union! Does it not seem that in these churches 
we are endeavoring to some extent to obey Christ in the first part of 
His Commission — *'Go ye, make disciples — baptize" — and have neg- 
lected, even disregarded, the latter part, equally as important, which 
reads: "Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have com- 
manded you." 

However, we are grateful for the earnest desire of many of our 
leaders to become more efficient as was manifested this year by the 
good representation from our association sent to the Regional Con- 
vention and Leadership Conference at Statesville. We feel assured 
that as a result we have more consecrated and efficient B. T. U. lead- 
ers than heretofore. 

Therefore, during the new year, we suggest and urge that a B. T. 
U. Revival and Enlargement Campaign be prayerfully and enthusias- 
tically launched in our association by those already enlisted with J)as- 
tors and parents sponsoring and co-operating with our associational 
and State workers, for the purpose of making our Union now existingr 

12 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



more efficient and for enlisting the unenlisted. 
Respectfully submitted, 

T. A. POWELL. 



W. M. U. REPORT 



Rev. E. N. Gardner read the report for Mrs. Gardner, who 
could not be present. On motion the Minutes of the Annual W. 
M. U. of the Association are to appear in the Minutes. 

Mrs. C. K. Dozier, of Japan, addressed the body on "A Con- 
structive Warfare for God in Japan," after which the congrega- 
tion sang: "O Zion Haste." 

To the Little River Association, Rav/ls Church, October 26, 1937. 

The work of the Woman's Missionary Union in our Association 
has g-one forward fairly steadily in the last twelve months. Thout^h 
much hampered by the inability of the Superintendent to visit the So- 
cieties, it has shown a gain in numbers of Societies — nine new ones 
organized and three lost, making a total of 64 Societies now function- 
ing. The table in the minutes will give a detailed report of work done. 
Let it be said here only that the individual Societies, leaders and mem- 
bers have advanced in devotion and serviceableness to the cause of 
Christ as expressed through the work of the Missionary Union; there 
has been a greater feeling of fellowship among us, and with our In- 
dian and Negro sisters, which feeling has been expressed by service 
and friendly contacts. The gifts to causes at home and abroad have 
increased. A greater sense of responsibility is developing. For all 
this we praise God and as we look on the large tasks which yet re- 
main for us, we take courage. 

The year 1938 marks for the W. M. U. of the South its fiftieth an- 
niversary. It will be celebrated, not merely at the Annual meeting to 
be held in May in Richmond, where the Union was organized so mod- 
estly in 1888, but throughout the year by programs and special occa- 
sions, but even more by renewed efforts along the familiar W. M. U. 
lines of Prayer, Bible and Mission Study, Service and Stewardship. It 
is our ambition and prayerful intention that the Little River W. M. U. 
shall have its full part in making this a year-long celebration, express- 
ing worthily our devotion to the cause of the Master. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTH C. GARDNER. 



Adjourned with prayer by Rev. John Ousley. 

13 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION 

Rev. E. N. Gardner conducted the devotional. Rev. J. J. 
Adams led in prayer. 

AGED MINISTERS 

Miss Mattie Bain read the report and on motion to adopt, 
Rev. J. J. Adams, Rev. E. N. Gardner and Prof. L. H. Cambpell 
led in the discussion. 

The work of caring for our ministers who have grown old in the 
service of Christ and for the widows of those who have gone to their 
Heavenly home, is carried on through the Relief and Annuity Board 
of the Southern Baptist Convention, located at Dallas, Texas. The 
outstretched hands of these who need food, clothing and shelter should 
make an appeal to the generosity of the men and women of our 
churches and one that should find quick response. 

The Board is asking that a special ''Fellowship Offering" be tak- 
en by each church at least once a year in connection with the observ- 
ance of the Lord's Supper. This offering will be in addition to their 
regular contributions and should be sent to the Relief and Annuity 
Board through the State offices. 

The Relief and Annuity Board has already paid to aged ministers 
and widows over three millions of dollars in benefits, but vastly more 
needs to be done and the Board is limited in what it can do only by the 
churches. "Who would begrudge a few embers to keep the frosts of 
winter from chilling the weary frames of these veterans of the Cross?" 

Respectfully submitted, 

MATTIE BAIN. 

o 

HOSPITALS 

Rev. Julius Holloway read the report and on motion to 
adopt presented Supt. Smith Hagaman, of Winston-Salem. He 
was given thirty minutes in which to address the body on our 
Baptist Hospital. 

On May 28, 1937, the Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem com- 
pleted its 14th year of ministry to the sick. During these years 38,000 
patients entered for treatment. About 1,000 could not be taken for 
want of room. This suggested an urgent need of enlargement of this 
Hospital. No one was turned away because he could not pay, nor as 
long as there was an empty bed. 

An addition to the nurses' home has just been completed which 
doubles its capacity. The cost was $28,047.30, which was largely pro- 
vided by local friends of the Hospital. It has enabled the Hospital to 
enter a first year class of 30 students, making a total of 48 in train- 
ing. 

14 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



The Hospital has received during the year: 

From Duke Endowment $13,404.00 

From Co-operative Program 8,026.81 

From Mothe-s' Day Offering 22,651.43 

Of the number of patients treated during the year about 1,700 
were "service" patients, paid little or nothing. 

During the year 1,000 mothers were returned to their families. 
More than 100 preachers, missionaries and members of their families 
were treated — most of which was fiee. 

The Hospital and its 66 doctors rendered $160,000 in free service 
during the year. 

Some linen, vegetables and canned fruit was given by W. M. U's. 
and other organizations of the churches. 

There has been a ve:y marked growth of interest and support of 
the Hospital throughout our state. 

Until a change in ''Plan of Support" the Hospital will be almost 
entirely dependent upon the once a year Mothers' Day offering y'or 
providing treatment for the large number who cannot pay, 

Jesus said, "Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers — freely ye have re- 
ceived, freely give." While Jesus was on earth in flesh He Vv^as more 
concerned about others than himself. Ahvays ministering to the sick 
and helpless. Today we have the opportunity of doing in Jesus' name 
deeds of service to men and women who need sympathy, treatment and 
prayers of workers who have given themselves unreservedly to Christ. 

Patients remark on the Spiritual atmosphere found at the Hospital 
among the entire group of Christian doctors and nurses. Let us en- 
large the service of these Christian doctors and nurses by making a 
larger contribution in money and prayer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JULIUS HOLLOWAY. 

o 

ORPHANAGE 

Rev. W. A. Weston read the report for J. C. Croom who 
could not be present. J. C. Hough discussed the report. Dr. B. 
W. Spilman told of the plans for the Perry Morgan Memorial 
Library building at the Kennedy Home. 

The Baptist Orphanage is carrying out these words, "Train up a 
child in the way he should go and when he is old he will not depart 
from it." (Proverbs ....). The childien are taken into the homes 
and are brought up under Christian environment and when they are 
sent out from the institution they are developed physically, mentally 
and spiritually to take their places of usefulness throughout the 
world. The health of the children is watched very closely due to the 
fact that only one death occurred during the past year, which is a re- 

15 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



markable record due to the large number of children under the care of 
the Orphanage. 

There are at present in the Mills and Kennedy Homes 654 child- 
ren, for which the cost per month per child is $21.71. Also there are 
189 being helped through mothers' aid and kept in boarding homes, 
making a total of 843 being cared for by the Baptist Orphanage. 

The main support of the Orphanage comes through the once-a- 
month contributions from the churches and Sunday Schools and the 
Thanksgiving offering which is looked forward to every year. The 
farms, printing department and special gifts are minor sources of 
revenue, but cannot be relied upon for any substantial support. 

We as Baptists should be gratified to the extent that we have con- 
tributed materially toward making over four thousand children happy 
during their childhood since the foundation of the Baptist Orphanage 
fifty-two years ago. Even with the good that we have done our 
hearts are saddened w'hen we are told that several hundred worthy 
boys and girls are seeking admission into our institution, but are de- 
nied admittance because there is no room for them. Perhaps this con- 
dition exists through our failure to do our best for the Orphanage. 

We would that every church within the State Convention send in 
regularly every month a contribution to the Orphanage regardless of 
the size and let every Baptist Church hold a service on Thanksgiving 
day and bring an offering as the Lord has blest them for the children 
of our adoption who are looking to us for the comforts of life. May 
we not forget the little ones who are now needing our support because 
Christ said, "Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid them 
not, for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven." 

Rev. E. N. Gardner offered the following amendment: 
Amendment to Report on Orphanage 

That the Committee on Nominations name an orphanage repre- 
sentative, who will seek to enlist all the churches or Sunday Schools of 
the association in contributing during the month of January, 1938, to 
the Perry Morgan Memorial Library to be erected at the Kennedy- 
Home. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. CROOM. 



TEMPERANCE AND PUBLIC MORALS 

Dr. C. D. Bain read the report and on motion to adopt pre- 
sented Gale K. Burgess, of Raleigh, who addressed the body. He 
said that 55 per cent of all insanity in America was caused by li- 
quor, that liquor was the greatest source and cause of crime in 
America, that liquor destroys economic, moral and spiritual se- 
curity, that liquor is public enemy "Number One." 

16 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOaATION 



A collection of $27.72 was received to aid the United Dry 
Forces. 

In this complex world in which we live, it is not always easy to 
know the right from the wrong but on the basis of the answer to the 
age-long question, "Am I my brother's keeper" and on the injunction, 
"Come out from among them and be ye separate, saith the Lord," v^e 
present the following observations. 
L .Public Morals. 

We deplore the rapid tendency toward Sabbath desecration as evi- 
denced in Sunday amusements, particularly Sunday movies; in open 
business ranging from drug stores and filling stations to heavy truck 
traffic on the highways down to the individual farmer loading his to- 
bacco and starting to market on the Lord's Day. 

We deplore increasing vacation laxness as evidenced by the 
sparsely-attended church seivices, the churches catering to this condi- 
tion by providing union services; the increased week-end resort at- 
tendance of many church leaders where conditions, to say the least, 
are not conducive to spirituality. 

We deplore the prevalence of slot-machines and other gambling 
devices; the wide-spread availability of lustful literature through 
commercial rental libraries and many vile magazines at newsstands. 

We deplore the low value placed on human life as evidenced in 
reckless driving on the highways. 

Surely in these and in all things that mean the weal or woe of hu- 
man beings, we are our brother's keeper. 
II. Temperance. 

Along temperance, or rather intemperance, lines, we deplore first 
of all, a legislature insensible to the expressed wishes of a vast ma- 
jority of the people of North Carolina by licensing liquor stores. We 
deplore the increased amount of drinking as evidenced by the receipts 
of the A. B. C. stores. The statement has been made, by reliable au- 
thority, that Wake County will spend this year approximately $500,000 
for its schools and churches combined and $1,000,000 for its drinking. 
Governor Hoey's statement, "You will never build either a great state 
or county upon the profits from the sale of liquor," should become the 
firm conviction of all our people. May the observation of Dr. W. L. 
Poteat on his 81st birthday, that legalized liquor will not long be tol- 
erated, be a speedy reality. 

In our relationship to these vital issues, let the Ministry fearlessly 
lead and regenerated people zealously follow. "Be not conformed to 
this world; but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, 
that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, 
will of God." Romans 12:2. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. D. BAIN. 

17 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Dr. M. L. Skaggs, of Campbell College, addressed the body 
on "The Church's Obligation Toward the Former Prisoners in 
Our Population." 

After prayer by Rev. Forrest Young the body adjourned for 
lunch. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

The congregation sang "Let the Lower Lights Be Burning, ' 
after which Rev. S. A. Rhyne conducted the devotional, using as 
his theme: "Witnessing for Christ in the Use of His Word." 

HOME MISSIONS 
Mrs. J. F. Andrews read the report and on motion to adopt, 
the report was discussed by Rev. W. A. Weston. 

In all our fields, millions of souls are dependent upon the Home 
Mission Board for the Word of Life. Our brothers in black, eleven 
millions of them right at ou:- door, are looking to us for help. Five 
mil. ion foreigners, spiritually marooned on our shores, are a challens:e 
to our passion for the lost. Revolution-ridden Cuba, in poverty and 
despair holds out to us its hands in mute appeal. Wherever we turn 
there is the plea of the underprivileged. The man without a chance 
here in the homeland gropes 'his way in spiritual darkness. In Okla- 
homa and New Mexico more than one hundred fifty-thousand Indians 
will never have a chance if the Home Mission Doard does not send 
them the Gospel. Two hundred tv/enty thousand Spanish-speaking 
people in New Mexico, eight hundred thousand Mexicans on this side 
of the border, and six hundred thousand souls in the Arcadian section 
in the French country will be deprived of a Savior if missionaries of 
the New Testament are not sent to them. 

The Home Mission Board is doing a great work. In all of its de- 
partments of work, including the field force, the Sanatorium, the 
Rescue Missions, the good will centers and schools, the board has three 
hundred twenty-seven missionaries working in eight hundred fifty 
mission stations. During the past convention year we have placed in 
the field thirty-five missionaries and have opened thirty-six new mis- 
sion stations. This enlargement of our work was made possible by the 
receipts from the Bottoms Trust and unsolicited designations. 

There is both religion and patriotism in the work of Home Mis- 
sions. We are winning our land for its own salvation and we are win- 
ning it to Christ for the salvation of the world. Many isms are attack- 
ing the foundation of our civilization just now. We must meet these 
isms with, the Gospel of Christ. 

18 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



If Christianity perishes from our land then will righteousness be 
overthrown and wickedness will destroy the nation. Each generation 
has to be evangelized. We must depend upon those who know Christ 
to preach the Gospel to those who know him not. A people who have 
lost contact with Christ cannot become a missionary force. To win 
the world to Ch:ist we must constantly and continuously give our- 
selves to the task of keeping our own land Christian. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. J. F. ANDREWS. 



SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

G. G. Page read the report and on motion to adopt Mr. Page 
ably discussed our Sunday School work. The table on "State of 
the Churches" will show the churches that had Daily Vacation 
Bible Schools last year. 

Each of the twenty-five churches in our Association has a Sunday 
School. There are also three mission Sunday Schools each of which is 
serving a definite need in its respective territory. One of these is lo- 
cated in East Erwin and is under the auspices of the Erwin church. 
Another serves a big territory lying between Anderson Creek high 
school and the town of Linden. It meets at the home of Brother A. P. 
Hall and is fostered by Brother J. F. Blackmon of the Buie's Creek 
church. The third is conducted by Mrs. Graham Talley in her home 
between Buie's Creek and Angler and is fostered by the Buie's Creek 
church. 

About 71 per cent of our church members are classed as resident 
and 74 per cent of these are enrolled in our Sunday Schools, indicating 
54 per cent of church members enrolled in Sunday Schools. Our Sun- 
day School enrollment is 73 per cent as large as our total church mem- 
bership and 114 per cent of the resident church membership, while on- 
ly 85 per cent of Sunday School enrollment are church members. 
There are fully two-thirds as many possibilities for our Sunday 
Schools not enrolled as are on the rolls. We have made some gains 
in enrollment during the year. 

The quality of work being done in our Sunday Schools has great- 
ly improved. The Standard of Excellence is increasingly becoming the 
program of work. More attention is being given to Bible study and 
the use of Bibles by officers, teachers and pupils than formerly. 

The departmental form of Associational organization fostered by 
the Sunday School Board is followed in the Association and each 
church is asked to co-operate fully. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. G. PAGE, for the Committee. 

19 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



OUR DEAD 

Rev. R. F. Hall read the report for Fred Hobbs, who could 
not be present. 

"Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord." 

"Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of his saints." 

After reading the names of those who have gone on to be 

with the Lord during the past year, the congregation stood for 

a moment in silent prayer and then sang: "In The Sweet Bye 

and Bye." 

Rev. C. B. Howard and Rev. G. Scott Turner presented the 
final report on "The State of the Churches." This report is 
found in the Minutes. The following brethren offered helpful 
suggestions to the body: W. A. Weston, C. W. Flowers, H. Y. 
Smith, W. E. Bond, S. A. Rhyne, J. Holloway, D. H.Senter, E. N. 
Gardner, R. F. Hall and L. H. Campbell. 

TREASURER S REPORT 

1936,Received from Churches for Minutes and Clerk $127.89 

Received for Missions: 

Oak Grove ^ $8.00 

Bethel 6.41 

Cumberland Union ._ 30.13 44.54 

Grand Total ___ $172.43 

PAID OUT— 

M. A. Huggins — Missions - $ 44.54 

Record Publishing Co. „.. 83.75 

Paid Clerk on 1935 Minutes .... 10.00 

Postage on 1935 Minutes -— 1.50 

Paid Clerk on 1936 Minutes - 25.00 

Postage and to deliver 1936 Minutes 3.50 

Grand Total Paid Out --.. $168.29 

Balance in Bank Oct. 1, 1937 $4.14 

R. F. HALL, Clerk-Treas. 

o 

On motion by Rev. G. Scott Turner, the congregation stood 
as an expression of love and appreciation to Rev. E. N. Gardner 
for his faithful services as Moderator of the Little River Asso- 
ciation for the past three years. 

20 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



On motion by Rev. R. K. Benfield the congregation express- 
ed thanks to the Rawls Church for the fine way in which they 
entertained the Association at this annual meeting. 

Rev. E. N. Gardner read the report of the Committee on 
Nominations. This report is found on the first pages of the 
Minutes. 

The report of the Committee on Time, Place and Preacher 
is also found on the first pages of the Minutes. 

On motion the Clerk is to receive $25.00 for his services in 
getting out the Minutes. 

The Sixty-Second Annual Session of the Little River Asso- 
ciation adjourned after appropriate remarks by the Moderator, 
Prof. Leslie H. Campbell, to meet next year at Baptist Grove 
Baptist Church on Tuesday and Wednesday after the fourth 
Sunday in October, 1938. 

The congregation stood and sang: "Onward Christian Sol- 
diers," and Rev. E. N. Gardner offered the closing prayer. 
LESLIE H. CAMPBELL, Moderator 
R. F. HALL, Clerk-Treasurer. 



21 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



MEETING OF THE PROMOTIONAL-EXECUTIVE COMMIT- 
TEE NOV. 28, 1937, AT BUIE'S CREEK 
Leslie H. Campbell, Presiding. 

Dr. B. W. Spilman conducted the devotional, reading from 
the book of Revelation. 

The Moderator stated the object of the meeting and called 
on the Clerk to call the roll of Churches. All but six churches 
answered to the roll call. There were 85 people present. 

R. K. Benfield was elected Associational B. T. U. Director. 
W. A. Weston was elected Educational Director of Sunday School 
work for the Association. 

Hawood West, director of the Perry Morgan Memorial Li- 
brary Fund for the Little River Association, called on Dr. B. W. 
Spilman to explain the plans for this Memorial Library, after 
which one representative from each church in the Association 
was selected to assist Mr. West. 

G. G. Page was instructed to write Mr. L. L. Morgan to see 
if we can get a special Sunday School worker for our Associa- 
tion next summer. 

R. K. Benfield was instructed to write Nathan Brooks to see 
if we can get special help in putting on our Associational B. T. 
U. enlargement campaign for next spring or summer. 

The Clerk called the roll of churches and goals were set and 
accepted by representatives from each church. These goals will 
be found in the table on the State of the Churches. 

On motion the Moderator was instructed to appoint a Com- 
mittee of ten with reference to the liquor situation in Harnett 
County. 

On motion the Promotion-Executive Committee approved 
the application of the Buie's Creek Church to the State Mission 
Board for $600.00 to be applied on the pastor's salary. 

Adjourn. 

LESLIE H. CAMPBELL, Moderator 
R. F. HALL, Clerk-Treasurer. 



22 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 

ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH, TUESDAY, SEPT. 7, 1937 

The meeting was called to order by the Superintendent, Mrs. E. N. 
Gardner. 

Hymn— "Holy Sprit, Faithful Guide." 

Theme— ''Christ for the World." 

Watchwoid — "Not by might nor by power, but by my spirit, 
saith the Lord of Hosts."— Zech. 4:6. 

Mrs. J. A. Buchanan used Acts 1, 1 to 8, and the watchword as 
the inspiration of her devotional. 

Greetings .were extended by Mrs. R. F. Hall, to which Mrs. C. L. 
Parker, of Erwin, responded. 

The program as piinted was adopted as order of business. 

Under the caption, "With Loving Zeal," the reports of the Mar- 
garet Fund Chairman and Training School were given. Mrs. W. E. 
Nichols could not be present so Miss Mattie Bain reported tha' Arch 
McMillan won the south-wide Margaret Fund scholarship. Gifts, 
heretofore sent to individual students, would in the future be made to 
a general fund. Other plans for the carrying on of this work would 
be disclosed at the divisional meeting Oct. 12, at Buie's Creek. 

Mrs. C. K. Smith, Training School chairman, asked that a special 
prograiii be planned in August in inteiest of the school. It was re- 
ported that gifts had been sought for the flooded districts and litera- 
ture had also been secured and distributed. She suggested that a per- 
manent committee be appointed in each society in order to do more ef- 
ficient work. Several Training School girls were present: Misses 
Elizabeth Draughon, Mattie Bain, Mary Currin, Mesdames W. A. 
Weston, Mrs. R. K. Benfield and C. K. Smith. 

Mrs. Weston Lillington spoke on the Training School of Study, 
giving the name and explaining the work of each teacher. 

Mrs. Binfield gave a very vivid picture of conditions during the 
flood and suggested that no finer piece of missionary work could be 
done than to repair the damages to the Training School. 

Reports of other committees under the theme "With One Accord," 
were heard. 

PERSONAL SERVICE REPORT 

The Stewardship Chairman, Mrs. D. D. Overby, made her report 
and urged that each society secure a stewardship chairman who will 
give her best to the advancement of the work. Instructions as to the 

23 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



work well carried out was given as well as where the latest and best 
information can be secured. 

Mrs. Paul Bradley, Mission Study Chairman, was unable to make 
an accurate report of mission study classes held during the year. An 
urgent need to get and keep accurate information was explained by 
both chairman and Miss Currin, who suggested that information cards 
be secured from headquarters for that purpose. Our societies should 
read more books on missions, and to deepen the impression desired, 
the making of placards, posters and scrap-books was recommended as 
helpful. The aims of 1938 in Mission Study and reading was set up — 
a wider knowledge of missions, a broader vision, more consecrated 
prayer and Christ-like spirit. 

Special music — Mrs. Chas. Howard. 

Roll call and reports of societies — Angier, Antioch, E'roadway, 
Buie's C:eek, Chalybeate Springs, Coats, Dunn, Erwin, Friendship, 
Harmony, Holly Springs, Lillington, NeilFs Creek, and Oak Grove re- 
sponded in person and Piney Grove by report. $20.20 Associational 
expense was collected. 

Superintendent's report was made. 

(See report). 

Mrs. Maishbanks took the chair and all the reports were unani- 
mously adopted. 

We were happy to recognize the following visitors: Mr. Turner, 
Mr. Benfield, Mr. Chas. Howard, Mr. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson, 
of Mt. Zion Association, Mr. and Mrs. Ovnoria Espinosa and two child- 
ren, from Chile, S. A. 

Committees were appointed: 

Nominating — Miss Mattie Bain, Mrs. B. P. Gentry, Mrs. R. D. 
Taylor, Mrs. Geo. O'Quinn, Mrs. Alton Johnson. 

Time and Place — Mrs. L. E. Johnson, Mrs. Elsie Crowder, Mrs. C. 
M. Hobbs, Mrs. M. B. Matthews. 

Resolutions— Mrs. R. I. Latta, Mrs. C. R. Parker, Mrs. D. J. Pat- 
terson, Mrs. Chas. Howard. 

A note was read from Rev. E. Norfleet Gardner, Moderator of 
Little River Association. 

A review of placards representing our missionary magazines was 
shown and subscriptions sought. 

The inspirational address, "The Work to Share," was given by 
Rev. Honario Espinosa, of Chile, S. A. Our hearts were lifted up 
and made eager to share the work as we listened to the conditions 
among the women of Chile. 

Mr. Turner dismissed us with prayer. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Hymn— "Publish Glad Tidings." 

Devotional— Psalm 1, led by Mrs. Benfield. 

Prayer — Mr. Hall. 

24 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



100,000 Club and Jubilee Plans were discussed by Mrs. Marsh- 
banks. 

Reports of Committees were made as follows: 

Nominating — (see report) adopted. 

Time and Place Committee reported that the Union would meet 
with Harmony Society Thursday after the first Sunday in September, 
1938. Adopted. 

Resolutions — (see report) adopted. 

For the Memorial Service, Mrs. Stephens read the names of 
those who had passed on: — Mrs. Siddie McLeod, Neill's Creek; Mrs. 
J. B'. Allen, Friendship; Miss Alex Draugfaon, Dunn; Mrs. R. E. 
Smith, Chalybeate Springs. 

With bowed heads, "Blest Be The Tie That Binds" was sung. 
Prayer by Mrs. Gardner. 

Reading of the Minutes. Corrections were made and adopted. 

o 

YOUNG PEOPLES' HOUR 
Mrs. D. D. Overby, Presiding. 

Roll call and report of Societies. 

Mrs. Overby gave the plans for Stewardship night and suggested 
a program. 

Reported that expenses were $6.50. 

A most interesting interview was given between Mrs. Espinosa 
and Mrs. Gardner. 

An inspirational talk — "Our Youth for Christ" — Miss Mary 
Currin. 

Dismissal with benediction in concert. 



25 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



OUR DEAD 



ANTIOCH— 

Mrs. Mary H. Byrd 

ANGIER— 

Mrs. S. H. Broadwell 

BAPTIST GROVE— 
Mr. W. H. Lee, Deacon 
Mr. A. L. Baucom 
Mrs. Martha Johnson 

BROADWAY— 

M:-. A. P. Thomas, Deacon 

BUTE'S CREEK— 
Miss Helen Harmon 
Mr, John R. Reardon 
Mr. E. L. Upchurch 
Mrs. J. D. Upchurch 



FRIENDSHIP— 

Mrs. J. B. Allen 

HOLLY SPRINGS— 
Mr. J. D. Burns 
Mr. Wesley Holder 

KENNEBEC— 
Mrs. Sallie Bond 
Mrs. Delph Rambeau 

LILLINGTON— 
Mrs. J. W. Halford 
Mr. T. F. Smith 

MACEDONIA— 
Mr. W. M. Smith 

NEILL'S CREEK— 
Mr. John R. Matthews 



CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— 


Mrs. S. A. McLeod 


Mr. Murdock McLean 


Mrs. Elector Blalock 


Mr. D. B. Andrews, Deacon 


OAK GROVE— 


Mrs. R. E. Smith 


Mrs. Easter Partin ■ 


COATS— 


PINEY GROVE— 


Z. R. Beasley- 


Miles Medlin 


DUNN— 


Mrs. 0. J. Honeycutt 


Mrs. L. F. Bailey 


Mis. Jane E. Betts 


Mr. W. S. Jackson 


Mrs. Lovie Stephens 


Mr. Robert E. Lee 


Mr. Arthur Mangum 


Miss Helen Poole 


PLEASANT MEMORY— 


Mr. R. G. Taylor, Jr. 


Hilton Turner, Deacon 


ERWIN— 




Mr. D. E. McDonald | 


Mr. W. G. Byrd 


Deacon 1 


Mr. Oliver Turner 1 


Committee, 1 




FRED HOPE'S. 1 




\ 



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MINUTES 

of the 

SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 

of the 

LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Held With 

BAPTIST GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 
OCTOBER 25 - 26 



1938 



Prof. Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator Buie's Creek 

Rev. G. Scott Turner, Vice-Moderator Erwin 

Rev. R. F. Hall, Clerk-Treasurer Lillington 



The next Annual Session will be held with the Bethel 

Baptist Church, Tuesday and Wednesday after 

the fourth Sunday in October, 1939. 

Rev. Waldo Early is to preach the Annual Sermon 
Rev. R. E. Atkins, alternate 

'V ■:■ ■ :■ ■;■ ^= 



MINUTES 

of the 

SIXTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 
of the 

LITTLE RIVER 

BAPTIST 
ASSOCIATION 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Held With 

BAPTIST GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 

OCTOBER 25-26 

193 8 

Prof. Leslie H. Campbell, Moderator Buie's Creek 

Rev. G. Scott Turner, Vice-Moderator Erwin 

Rev. R. F. Hall, Clerk-Treasurer Lillington 



The next Annual Session will be held with the Bethel 

Baptist Church, Tuesday and Wednesday after 

the fourth Sunday in October, 1939. 

Rev. Waldo Early is to preach the Annual Sermon 
Rev. R. E. Atkins, alternate . 



THE RECORD PUBLISHING CO., 
ZEBULON, N. C 



INDEX 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 4 

PROCEEDINGS BEGIN 6 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS 6 

MODERATOR'S ADDRESS 6 

REPORTS:— 

Religious Literature 8 

Christian Education L . 10 

State Missions 11 

Home Missions 12 

Foreign Missions 14 

Sunday Schools 16 

B. T. U. 17 ' 

W. M. U 18 

Aged Ministers 19 

Hospitals 21 

Orphanage . 23 

Temperance 24 

Finance 25 

Resolutions 26 

Time, Place, Preacher 26 

Concerning Ordination 26 

Petition 27 

Obituaries 29 & 30 

\V. M. U. MINUTES 31 

PROMOTIONAL EX. COM. MEETING 37 

TABLES BEGIN 38 




DEDICATION 
to 
RUTH CARVER GARDNER 
^ An able and efficient leader, whose amiable personality and de- 
votion to Christ's program have endeared her to the hearts "of people 
and made her an inspiration in the Little River Association. 
Supt. of Liberty Associational W. M. U., 1927-29 
Supt. of Little River Associational W. M. U., 1935-38. 
Author of 
''Christ in the World" (1935) 
^'Christ's Gift to the Churches" (1936) 
''A Baptist Builder in China" (Life of R. E. Chambers 
be published in 1939). 
Contributor to W. M. U. and S. S. periodicals of 
Southern Baptist Convention 



to 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



ASSOCIATIONAL DIRECTORY 

EXECUTIVE-PROMOTION COMMITTEE 
1938-39 

Leslie H. Campbell, Chairman R. F. Hall, Clerk 

All pastors and the following: 

Angler A. C. Barefoot, Angier 

Antioch J, C. Bullock, Lillington 

Baptist Chapel J. R. Howard, R. F. D., Jonesboro 

Baptist Grove A. B. Holland, R. F. D., Fuquay Springs 

Bethel J. C. Holder, R. F. D. 1, Linden 

Buie's Creek John Gregory, Buie's Creek 

Broadway G. L. Stone, Broadway 

Chalybeate Springs Paul Bradley, Kipling 

Coats Dr. C. G. Fuquay, Coats 

Cumberland Union J. S. Brown, Varina 

Dunn Mrs. S. D. Whittenton, Dunn 

Erwin W. C. Stone, Erwin 

Friendship F. D. Byrd, Bunnlevel 

Harmony J. E. Hayes, R. F. D., Lillington 

Holly Springs D. J. Patterson, Broadway R. F. D. 

Kennebec C. J. Howard, Varina 

Layton's Chapel Charles Moore, R. F. D., Lillington 

Lillington Mrs. J. G. Layton, Lillington 

Macedonia Ed Holt, Holly Springs 

Neill's Creek Mrs. Jesse Keith, R. F. D., Lillington 

Oak Grove Leland Matthews, R. F. D., Angier 

Piney Grove , W. E. Med'lin, Casma 

Pleasant Memory H. L. Cutts, R. F. D., Coats 

I^^wls Frank Jones, Fuquay Springs 

Swann's Station Arnold Batchelor, Olivia 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES FOR 1939 

Aged Ministers Owen Odum, Coats 

Baptist Training Union President Associational B. T. U. 

Christian Education Miss Gladys Strickland, Buie's Creek 

Foreign Missions B. B-. Wilson, Holly Springs 

Home Missions S. A. Rhyne, Piney Grove 

Hospitals Hal Smith, Swann's Station 

Temperance and Public Morals M. L. Skaggs, Buie's Creek 

Orphanage Representative I. L. Howell, Piney Grove 

Obituaries p. L. Young, Coats 

Religious Literature C. D. Bain, Dunn 

State Missions C. H. Norris, Neill's Creek 

State of Churches Scott Turner, Erwin 

Sunday Schools Miss Zula Rogers, Antioch 

Woman's Work Mrs. R. K. Benfield, Angier 

4 



:-: LITTLE RIV ER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION ^^ 

ASSOCIATIONAL SUNDAY SCHOOL OFFICERS 

Associational Superintendent G. G. Page, Buie's Creek 

Superintendent of Evangelism C. B. Howard, Buie's Creek 

Superintendent of Training Waldo Early, Broadway 

Secretary-Treasurer Miss Mamie Haighwood, Lillington 

GROUP SUPERINTENDENTS 

1. Western Miss Zula Rogers, Mamers 

2. Central W. E. Medlin, Casma 

3. Eastern Dr. C. D. Bain, Dunn 

ASSOCIATIONAL B. T. U. OFFICERS 

Director Waldo Early, Broadway 

Associate Director Truby Powell, Lillington 

Secretary-Treasurer Miss Mamie Haighwood, Lillington 

Chorister Claude White, B'uie's Creek 

Pianist S. C. Carroll, Buie's Creek 

Pastor-Adviser R. K. Benfield, Angier 

Story Hour Leader Mrs. E. L. Powell, Mamers 

Junior Leader Miss Bessie McNeill, Broadway 

Intermediate Leader Miss Frances Byrd, Buie's Creek 

Senior Leader Mrs. Truby Powell, Lillington 

Adult Leader Miss Lillian Draughan 

GROUP DIRECTORS 

1. Eastern Miss Egeta Williams, Angier 

2. Central Miss Violet Penny, Chalybeate Springs 

3. Western Miss Irma Knight, Broadway 

ASSOCIATIONAL W. M. U. OFFICERS 

Superintendent Mrs. R. K. Benfield, Angier 

Associate Superintendent Mrs. S. D. Whittenton, Dunn 

Secretary-Treasurer Mrs. A. L. Overby, Angier 

Young People's Leader Mrs. C. B. Howard, Buie's Creek 

Mission Study Leader Mrs. R. F. Hall, Lillington 

Personal Service Chairman . . . Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks, Buie's Creek 

Stewardship Chairman Mrs. D. D. Overby, Angier 

Margaret Fund Chairman . . . Mrs. D. H. Senter, Chalybeate Springs 
Training School Chairman . . . Mrs. C. K. Smith, Chalybeate Springs 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



PROCEEDINGS 

TUESDAY MORNING SESSION 
Theme: The Why and How of A Spiritual Revival 

The Sixty-Third Annual Session of the Little River Baptist 
Association convened with the Baptist Grove Church near 
Chalybeate Springs, October 25-26, 1938 with the Moderator, 
Prof. Leslie H. Campbell in the chair. 

The congregation sang: "At the Cross", and Rev. J. E. 
Lanier of Wallace offered a fervent prayer for God's leadership 
and blessings on this session of the association. "If Ever I Loved 
Thee" was sung by the congregation. 

The Introductory Sermon was preached by Rev. R. K. Ben- 
field of Angier. Matt. 16:24 was used as the text. The subject: 
"The Cost of a Genuine Revival." The speaker spoke first of 
self-denial, second, cross-bearing, and third, following Jesus. At 
the conclusion of the sermon, Earl Bradley of Spencer, offered 
prayer and the Moderator led the congregation in singing, as a 
prayer, "Come Into My Heart, Lord Jesus." 

Election of Officers 

Leslie H. Campbell was re-elected moderator, G. Scott Turn- 
er was re-elected vice-moderator, and R. ?. Hall was re-elected 
clerk-treasurer. 

Constitution 

D. H. Senter presented and read the Constitution of the 
Little River Association after which a committee was appointed 
to revise the Constitution. The names of this committee are 
found elsewhere in the minutes. 

The Moderator recognized several visitors and extended 
them a hearty welcome, among whom were: M. O. Alexander, J. 
E. Lanier, Lucas Evans, Claud Council, and Dr. W. R. Cullom. 

Moderator's Address 

Few words will suffice to record the Moderator's achievements 
during the past year, but volumes could be written upon the field of 
opportunity and need now confronting us. This report, therefore, 

6 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



will briefly summarize the poirits of emphasis in our past year's 
work, and then call attention to certain recommendations for the 
program ahead. 

The Moderator has visited less than one-third of the churches in 
our Association during the past year, but with the exception of one 
impossible request, has accepted every invitation to render special 
service received. Instead of personal visitations to the churches, 
quarterly meetings of church leaders have been conducted with some 
excellent results. Too much cannot be said in praise of the faithful 
in our Association who have attended these business meetings and 
contributed to the making of a better year. 

Another innovation was the establishment of specific, concrete 
goals of achievement for each church organization and its subsidiary 
agencies. Most of the churches through their leaders accepted these 
goals, after careful revision in some instances, and have evidently 
made an honest effort to reach them. Without conclusive evidence 
of the effectiveness of these goals, we at least are gratified to hear 
from our State headquarters that 20 out of 25 churches outstripped 
during the first ten months of this year the financial record for the 
whole year preceding. 

One of the finest developments of the year, judging by observa- 
tion and reports, is the coming of Bro. Waldo Early as resident pas- 
tor to the field of churches composed of Baptist Chapel, Broadway, 
Holly Springs, and Swann's Station. While appreciating the sacri- 
ficial efforts of every non-resident pastor, we still must recognize 
that no church can do its best without the abiding presence of a 
spirit-filled, aggressive leader. Much thought should be given to the 
establishment of fields within associational bounds, wherever pos- 
sible, when part-time churches become pastorless. 

The establishment of the Kingdom of Righteousness within the 
bounds of our Association seems, at times, all too slow of realization. 
May we not with profit critically examine our own devotion to the 
cause, the efficiency of our collective efforts, and the possibility of 
employing better ways of reaching our objectives? How better may 
we evaluate the worth-whileness of this annual assembly than by de- 
termining the amount of inspiration and the planning which get back 
to the local churches ? If as a result of this meeting no vows are re- 
affirmed, or made, and no new ideas are born in us, what justifica- 
tion exists for this expenditure of energy and time? 

With these thoughts in mind the Moderator would humbly sub- 
mit the following- suggestions for your consideration: 

1. That at this meeting favorable consideration be given to the 
reports of two special committees: viz, the report on a plan where- 
by each church may participate with its pastor in providing annu- 
ities as a retirement fund, and the report of the committee recom- 
mending greater care in the setting apart, the preparation, the ex- 

7 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



animation and the ordination of preachers. 

2. That each church solicit as large Biblical Recorder club as 
possible at the special club rates. 

3. That every church unite in our Associational Stewardship 
Revival, Nov. 7-13. 

4. That we, recognizing the great need for a spiritual revival, 
enter whole-heartedly into the program of Southern Baptists to win 
the unsaved in our Southland to Christ. 

5. That a committee be appointed to consider possibilities of a 
closer cooperation between the Little River Association and Camp- 
bell College for their mutual benefit. 

6. That a committee be appointed to report one year hence on 
the practicability of consolidating certain branches of our church or- 
ganization in an effort to reduce to a minimum our rapidly multiply- 
ing organizations and meetings. 

7. That a committee be appointed to study carefully the form, 
arrangement and content of our Associational minutes, with a view 
to improving its attractiveness, readability, and usefulness. 

8. That we consider at this meeting the wisdom of supplying 
every home represented in each of our churches with a copy of the 
minutes of the Association. 

9. That the messengers to this annual meeting find opportunity, 
if necessary, to report orally to their churches significant impres- 
sions made by this meeting and actions taken which might contribute 
to the work of their group. 

Respectfully submitted, 

, , LESLIE H. CAMPBELL. 

— o 

Report on Religious Literature 

This report was read by Truby Powell and discussed by Rev. 
L. R. Evans, Biblical Recorder representative. The report was 
adopted, and is as follows: 

Dr. S. D. Gordon in his book "QUIET TALKS ON HOME 
IDEALS," says, "As simple a thing as a book or a picture has great 
influence in moulding character. Frequently a bad book has blighted 
and embittered a whole life. Yet, more frequently just one little 
bunch of small leaves, fastened together, carried off in a pocket, has 
turned a life completely around— and good pictures are like Angels 
of God in their blessed ministry." 

He tells this story of a young man, the walls of whose room 
•were covered with cheap flaming prints of advertisement pictures 
and actresses and the like. A friend gave him a copy of Hoffman's 
Gethsemane Christ-head. Soon he was up in a chair and taking the 
cheap prints down. He said, 'T couldn't let those cheap things stay 

8 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



there beside that face"! Dr. Gordon says, ''And without doubt the 
chang-e in the walls of his room told a change in the inner walls of 
his heart, too." We ask might not a similar change take place with 
reference to the literature on the tables and in the libraries and in the 
hearts in our homes if our parents would see that the best literature 
is placed there. 

Surely our churches should lead in providing this Christian liter- 
ature for our homes. This year in our association special effort has 
been made to increase subscriptions to our State paper, the Biblical 
Recorder. We have adopted the associational club plan, as recom- 
mended by our circulation Manager, Mr. R. F. Terrell, asking each 
church to form a club of subscriptions, at reduced rate of $1.50 a year 
of at least ten per cent of its resident members. The responsibility 
has been laid mainly on the pastors to see that a local representative 
or committee was appointed to lead in arranging for the observance 
of Religious Literature Day and in the formation of these clubs. 

At the beginning of the associational year, we had 131 subscrip- 
tions to Biblical Recorder; 13 to Home and Foreign Fields; 179 to 
Royal Service; 32 to Window of Y. W. A., and 38 to World Com- 
rades. We feel sure during this year that the number of subscrip- 
tions to our State paper have increased in those churches where 
these clubs have been formed. We are glad to report that some of our 
churches have cooperated successfully. May we urge each church 
which has not cooperated heretofore to launch its efforts with the 
coming of the new associated year. 

Since our last annual meeting ''Home and Foreign Fields" has 
been changed to "The Commission," a less expensive, more unique 
and better Missionary magazine. We want to urge that along with 
the B'iblical Recorder campaign, special effort be put forth to increase 
subscriptions not only to the above-mentioned, but to the Charity 
and Children, Royal Service, Window of Y. W. A., and World Com- 
rades. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. A. POWELL. 
o 

On motion Rev. M. O. Alexander of Raleigh was given ten 
minutes to speak on the Stewardship Revival to be held in the 
Little River Association November 7-13, 1938. Thirteen churches 
indicated that they would co-operate. 

Report on Christian Education 

This report was written by H. B. Taylor and read by C. H. 
Norris. Dr. W. R. Cullom of Wake Forest discussed the report. 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



REPORT ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 
The Why and How of a Spiritual Revival in our Colleges. 

Although our state schools are wonderful in their work and en- 
deavor, there is the thought that the education derived from them is 
not complete. In fact, the beloved Dr. George W. Truett says in his 
pamphlet on Christian Education, "Christian education is the only 
complete education." 

With this thought in mind, it is only natural that we turn to our 
denominational schools for the real spiritual revival that leads to the 
"complete education." 

And as we turn to our denominational schools, again, naturally, 
we turn our eyes and thoughts toward Wake Forest, Meredith, 
Campbell, Chowan, Mars Hill and other schools controlled by the dif- 
ferent churches. 

Those schools are filled with young- men and young women, many 
having been sent without the real ''home" foundation along religious 
lines, and these young lives are in the keeping of the heads of the 
various schools, and we should be grateful indeed for the Christian 
leadership of our denominational schools, for in them we have the 
foundation for our spiritual revival; the foundation that was built 
not of sand. 

The colleges will furnish the spiritual development of these fine 
young men and women, for it is said that our colleges "are the final 
touch of one's education." 

WHY a spiritual revival in our colleges? One reason — the Bible, 
both the old and the new testament teaches Christian education. An- 
other reason — every young man and woman has the right to an equal 
chance in any educational endeavor, and an education is not com- 
plete without the proper religious teaching and training. 

HOW a spiritual revival in our colleges? By teaching the works 
of the lowly Nazarene, who two thousand years ago in his sermon on 
the mount said, **Let your light so shine before men, that they may 
see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven." 

H. B. TAYLOR. 



The clerk called the roll of churches and 23 out of 25 church- 
es in the association answered present. 

After prayer by S. A. Rhyne the body adjourned for dinner. 
C. H. Norris, pastor of the host church, extended a cordial wel- 
come to all present. 



10 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

Songs: "Sweet Hour of Prayer", "Tis So Swdet to Trust in 
Jesus" were sung by the congregation. Rev. J. R. McDaniel offer- 
ed prayer. 

Mrs. J. G. Layton brought a helpful message on "The Why 
and How of A Spiritual Revival in the Home". A. W. Weston, 
H. C. Upchurch, and L. H. Campbell also spoke briefly on the 
subject. 

Report on State Missions 

This report was read by W. A. Weston. It was adopted and 
is as follows: 

For a hundred years the objective of State Missions has been to 
win the people of North Carolina to Christ and then to the fellowship 
which the church provides. During- more recent years, notably dur- 
ing the past quarter of a century, the training and development of 
those who come into the churches has been an additional function of 
State Missions, so that from small beginnings the state mission task 
now includes many varied activities. Those we list and discuss 
briefly: 

1. Missionary Pastoral Assistance: 

The board furnishes financial aid when a church is in its infancy 
and in need. Now many of these have grown to great strength and 
are returning: to the state treasury an hundred-fold. If this work 
did not go on, more pastors would be busy with this and that to sup- 
port their families and more and more hungry sheep would look up 
and not be fed. 

2. Teaching and Training: 

Emphasis has ceased to be solely on evangelism and the enlarg- 
ing task of teaching, training and developing the membership is be- 
ing undertaken. 

3. Church building: 

Churches in advantageous positions are aided in building church 
houses. 

4. Indians: 

Rev. and Mrs. Lunsford have been working in Robeson county 
for several years. 

5. Negroes: 

Our convention is aiding the Negroes in helping them to keep on 
the field W. C. Somerville and D. C. Clanton. 

6. Work Among Students in Colleges: 

State Missions at present is undertaking to provide a few in- 
dent secretaries in our educational centers. 

11 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



7. Hospitals and Sanatoriums : 

Personal work is done in Oteen Hospital, N. C. Sanatorium at 
Black Mountain, State Sanatorium and Samarcand. 

8. General Missionaries: 

M. 0. Alexander and J. C. Pipes aid in revivals, general meet- 
ings and needy calls. 

State Missions and Christian Education are the "Service of Sup- 
ply" for Foreign Missions and Home Missions, as well as other 
agencies. 

Whereas the emphasis of this associational meeting is to be on 
the Why and How of a Spiritual Revival, 

Be It Resolved: 

First, that a committee make a survey of the evangelistic needs 
and to inaugurate a program of evangelism in this associational 
area, and. 

Second, that more emphasis be placed on development of per- 
sonal soul winners, and, 

Third, that this committee plan for an evangelistic rally in this 
association early during 1939, for prayer and promotion of the ob- 
jectives mentioned above. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. A. WESTON. 

o 

Report on Home Missions 

This report was read by H. C. Upchurch. C. B. Howard de- 
livered a soul stirring message on Home Missions. Report was 
adopted. 

Jesus said, "Make unto yourself friends by means of the mam- 
mon of unrighteousness; that when it shall fail they may receive 
you into the eternal tabernacles." God has given us the glorious 
privilege of using not only our talents but our money in preaching 
and teaching the glorious gospel of the Son of God. In the seventh 
chapter of Rev. we sea an angel from the sunrising, and four other 
angels to hold back the destructive forces until God can win to Him- 
self, through Christ, a sufficient or perfect number upon whom He 
can perfectly and fully expend His great love. 

In Home Missions we see God's people joyfully obeying His com- 
mand to seek and bring to salvation that which is lost. Following a 
period of painful retrenchment we are again going forward. The 
Lord has richly blessed our missionaries in every field. There are 
now 332 working in 886 mission stations. During the past year 23 
new missionaries have been put in the field, 22 new chapels and pas. 
tors' homes built, and over 100 new mission stations opened, over 
776,319 tracts and 34,530 Bibles and portions of the scripture dis- 

12 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



tributed. Fifty thousand people have been personally visited and 
talked to about their salvation, in addition to the people appealed to 
in the 36,579 sermons and addresses delivered. 

It has been impossible to tell the full story of the benefits to 
Home Missions by the Bottoms Trust. In addition to the actual 
work done, there has been a renewing- of morale, a thrilling, soul-in- 
spiring enthusiasm that can never be put into figures. All along- the 
Rio Grande in Texas, up into New Mexico, throughout Louisiana, 
and over the entire field in Cuba there has gone a spiritual wave of 
renewed hope, joy and determination to carry on, created by the Bot- 
toms Trust, that has given new life to our work. 

From year to year the Women's Missionary Union has shown in- 
creasing interest in Home Missions. Their prayers have encircled 
the millions of lost souls in the homeland and Cuba. Their gifts 
have maintained hundreds of missionaries in the field. Their gifts 
increased from |113,981.15 in 1936 to $130,904.86 in 1937. 

Continued progress, both in increased receipts and in payments 
on our debts is plainly seen in the financial report. The Board re- 
ceived from all sources in 1937 $508,454.67, an increase of |64,999.40, 
or 14 per cent. The treasurer's report shows that $145,560.37 was 
paid on the principal of the debt in 1937. This is the larg-est amount 
paid since 1929. The Board has strictly adhered to a cash basis for 
five years. 

We would commend to our people our magazine ''Southern Bap- 
tist Home Missions" as the most authentic source of full informa- 
tion on home mission work, needs and trends of today. This fast- 
grovdng paper has had an increase of nearly 2,000 subscribers per 
month since January, 1938. The price is only 25 cents per year. 

The Home Mission Board is filling a great need in the bringing 
of the millions of souls in our land to Christ. Unless and until our 
country becomes more Christian than it is today, foreign lands will 
say, with justification, to us, "Physician heal thyself." The work to 
be done is more vitally related to the whole task of the denomination 
than ever before. We must, under God, make our land Christian or 
be faced with everlasting shame. God will do His part to win the 
millions of our land to Christ. Will we do ours? If we are ^ully 
His we will. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HUGH C. UPCHURCH 
— 

The Moderator appointed the following Committees: 

Committee on Constitution: 

G. Scott Turner, D. H. Senter, E. N. Gardner, Waldo 
Early, Mrs. R. K. Benfield. 



13 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Time, Place, Preacher: 

R. K. Benfield, John Gregory, Mrs. Anna Rickman. 

Committee on Resolutions: 

S. A. Rhyne, Miss Lillian Draughon, Mrs. Truby Powell 

Finance Committee: 

R. F. Hall, C. W. Flowers, H. M. Thomas. 

Committee on Nominations: 

E. N. Gardner, M. M. Jernigan, Joe Bullock, Mrs. D. B. 
Andrews, Waldo Early. 

Report on Foreign Missions 

Read by F. L. Young and discussed by E. N. Gardner. Re- 
port adopted. 

Jesus said to twelve Jewish men, "Follow me and I will make 
you fishers of men," The Foreign Mission Board of the Southern 
Baptist Convention, in answer to that same call, has appointed 1,078 
missionaries who have been, by replacement, fishing for men for the 
last ninety-three years. Last year there were 413 missionaries and 
974 ordained natives in 13 different countries. The great drag-net 
is made up of 319 different types of schools, 38 hospitals, 1,802 
churches, 2,293 Sunday Schools, 1,361 women's societies, and 1,471 
young people's societies. 

To finance these fishing expeditions Southern Baptists have 
given in 1937 $1,077,996.34. Of this amount the Lottie Moon offer- 
ing of $290,000 by the W. M. U. was truly a resuscitative Christmas 
gift. If the men of this great convention would take the missionary 
enterprise as seriously as the women we would soon blast the trum- 
pets of a financial jubilee. 

But we have more serious troubles than that of finance. In 
many nations new Pharaohs are rising to the throne of power. These 
Pharaohs are enemies of the Cross. Not by downright "no" do they 
hope to forbid missionary zeal in their countries but by restrictions 
too^ severe to be met. In one country Baptists cannot serve unless 
their church is on a street where no other church appears, unless 
each church has its own cemetery and many other like restrictions. 
Dr. Truett recently announced that by restrictions Rumania has 
closed her doors to Baptists. Russia has used similar restrictions to 
a marked degree. Japan has destroyed millions of dollars Worth of 
Southern Baptist property in China and if the Japanese militarists 
gain control of both Japan and China we may then have but one 
guess. 

14 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



If Jesus were to speak to us today as He did to the disciples He 
would say 'Tray ye the Lord of the Harvest that He will open and 
keep open the doors to the Harvest Fields." 

These foreign national thundershowers should drive every 
Southern Baptist under a haystack to stay there until he can come 
forth with the victory of an unconditional surrender. The Bible 
says that every knee shall bow before Him. It is part of our spiritual 
heritage to force these belligerent rulers to bow before Jesus and 
crown Him Lord of all. Twelve disciples, potentially, made the Great 
Roman Empire bow before Him. Surely this great host of Christian 
believers today can make the enemies of the Cross kiss the very 
ground before the feet of Jesus. God said in Isaiah that when the 
enemy came in like a flood the Spirit would lift up a standard 
against him. 

The questions confront us then: Do we have the same devo- 
tion as the middle century Christians? Will we fast and pray with 
Esther and Mordecai until Haman is hanged, or will we stand afar 
off with Peter denying our Lord and eventually go '*a-f ishin,g" ? 
I think I hear voices crying in the night to an Unknov^rn God: 

Master, the tempest is raging! 

The billows are tossing high! 

The sky is o'ershadowed with blackness. 

No shelter or help is nigh; 

Carest Thou not that we perish? 

How canst Thou lie asleep. 

When each moment so madly is threatening 

A grave in the angry deep? 
Let us pray to Him who said "All power is given unto Me" un- 
til we hear the voices again saying: 

"Master, the terror is over. 

The elements sweetly rest; 

Earth's sun in the calm lake is mirrored, 

And heaven's within my breast. 

Linger, blessed Redeemer, 

Leave me alone no more; 

And with joy I shall make the blest harbor. 

And rest on the blissful shore." 
Respectfully submitted. 

F. L. YOUNG. 



The Clerk called the roll of churches and a representative 
from ^ch church made a brief report for his church. 

After prayer by F. L. Young the body adjourned the after- 
noon session. 



15 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



TUESDAY NIGHT SESSION 

Songs: "Revive Us Again'' and "Amazing Grace" were sung 
by the congregation, and John McCrimmon offered prayer. 

The Moderator briefly and effectively summarized the high 
spots of the day's program and called attention to the program 

for Wednesday. 

Report on Sunday Schools 

Read by W. E. Medfin and discussed by G. G. Page. Report 
adopted. 

The Why and How of a Spiritual Revival in Our Churches. 

Why we need it so much in our Sunday Schools. As we look 
about us and see the evil forces as they try to draw the youth of our 
land into worldly pleasures that mean destruction to their lives. We 
need to awaken more to our duties as Christians and use every 
means that God has placed within our grasp to win them to Christ. 
We should thank God for the organization of our churches and Sun- 
day Schools, v/here we can take the old and the young and teach 
them God's word that it might help to reprove and correct their lives 
by bringing them into the light of God's truth and help win souls to 
Christ. 

We can help by humbling ourselves as leaders and Christians at 
the Master's feet, by seeking wisdom and knowledge that He gives to 
all men liberally and upbraideth not, and then receiving the power 
from God that will help us to study to show ourselves approved 
workmen of God, rightly dividing the word of Truth so that we may 
be able to give to each a portion in due season. 

As "we review the work of past years we note there has beeai 
a slight gain of 278 members in our associational work. This brings 
our total enrollment to 5,788. Our goal as set by our association 
this year was 6,261. This leaves us short 473, with the possibility of 
around 4000 souls who need to be in our Sunday Schools. 

May the heavenly fire be rekindled now within our souls, that we 
may see through the eye of the Holy Spirit, the fields that arei 
white unto harvest. May we not only pray for more laborers for the 
harvest, but be willing to help answer our prayers by throwing all 
that we have unselfishly into the harvest of our Sunday School and 
Daily Vacation Bible School work. May we help win souls to Christ 
by cooperating with our associational leaders, with our prayers and 
efforts, that God may give us a great revival in our churches and 
Sunday Schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. E. MEDLIN 

16 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Report on B. T. U. 

Read by Miss Egeta Williams, and discussed by Miss Addie 
Prevatte. Adopted. 

The work of the Baptist Training Union in our Association has 
gone forward fairly steadily in the last twelve months. We feel that 
there is a greater interest in Training Union work throughout the en- 
tire association. One year ago the suggestion was made that a B-. T. 
U. Revival and Enlargement Campaign be prayerfully and enthusi- 
astically launched in our association for the purpose of making the 
Training Union more efficient and for enlisting the unenlisted. 

During the past year this B. T. U. Revival and Enlargement 
Campaign was promoted in a very effective way. With the help of 
our State T. U. workers, study courses were held in twenty-one of 
our twenty-five churches. In these churches there were from one to 
four classes for the different age groups. More than twelve hun- 
dred people were enrolled in these classes with an average attendance 
for the five nights of about eight hundred. Many new unions were 
organized with many new workers being enlisted. Weaker unions 
were encouraged and made stronger. During the past year 681 
awards have been made for the completion of some study course 
book. Of the twenty-five churches in our Association twenty-one 
have some form of Training Union work. We have sixty-eight or- 
ganizations and nine Story Hours. 

But there is much work to be done. During this coming year we 
should strive to reach these four churches that have no Training 
Union work. Many of the unions now are just existing and shoi|ld 
be strengthened. More churches need to organize the complete 
Training Union in order to reach all age groups in the best way. 
But the greatest need of all is the enlisting of more adult people in 
this work. No church can have the active, efficient, helpful Train- 
ing Union that it should have until the adult people take a greater 
interest in this work. May all of us work together for a better 
trained Church membership in order that we may be His workmen 
unashamed, "rightly dividing the Word of Truth." 

Respectfully submitted, 

EGETA WILLIAMS. 



Report on W. M. U. Work 

Read by Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks and discussed by Mrs. R. K. 
Benfield, new W. M. U. Superintendent of Little River Associa- 
tion. Report adopted. On motion, the 1938 issue of the minutes 
of the Little River Association be dedicated to the splendid work 

17 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



of Mrs. E. N. Gardner, former W. M. U. Superintendent and that 
a picture of Mrs. Gardner appear in the minutes with an ap- 
propriate caption written by Mrs. Benfield. 

REPORT ON W. M. U. 

Three years ago when Mrs. Paul Bradley, who had been Super- 
intendent of the W. M. U. work for a number of years, felt she must 
give up the work, Mrs. E. N. Gardner was chosen as our Jeader. 
During her years of service she has made a very great contribution 
to the W. M. U. work in organizing into a unit all of the societies of! 
the Little River Association. Through the quarterly executive 
meetings she called, composed of all the officers and leaders of the 
woman's work who would spend a day each quarter reporting, pray- 
ing for, and planning, the work has steadily grown, and the coopera- 
tion, fellowship and inspiration have been greatly strengthened 
among our women. 

The table in the minutes will show a steady growth of new so- 
cieties and enlistment of members, but we are still far from our goal 
of societies being organized in every chui^ch and a standard of at 
least 50 per cent of the women and young people of the churches be- 
ing enlisted in these societies. We still have seven churches with no 
societies at all. 

Our mission study work has been more encouraging than here- 
tofore. More of the societies are seriously studying the fields and 
their needs and thereby gaining a greater knowledge of the work 
that has been done and avv^aits to be done. Through study we look 
upon the fields and take new courage. 

Our personal service work has been reaching out farther than 
before. Much is being done by our women among the Indian and 
Negro sisters in reach of us. The gospel is being carried into the 
prison camps, to the county home and to mission points. A Bible 
woman is being supported in China. Boxes of supplies and personal 
needs are being sent to the hospital and other places and fields of! 
need, also love gifts to our missionaries' children and Training 
School girls away from home. 

There remains much to be done in the field of stewardship. We 
have not grown in giving proportionately with our enlistment, mis- 
sion study and personal service. Our gifts were less in 1937 than in 
1936. A greater cry comes year after year for consecrated and 
trained leadership. Where are our recruits? Why aren't young 
people giving of their time, talent and trained inter.ect into the work 
of the kingdom ? Yet we are growing in the spirit of giving and the 
efficiency and joy of Christian service. We rejoice that God is open- 
ing the eyes of women to the white fields before us, and we pray 
earnestly that we may be led on to a triumphant victory. 

Our Superintendent of the past three years, feeling that the time 

18 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



has come when it is urgent that the churches be visited and that the 
women be encouraged and inspired by the personal contact of their 
leader, and she being physically unable to meet this need, asked that 
we appoint a new superintendent to carry on the work in the future. 
Mrs. W. K. Benfield was elected to the task. With her leading us' 
we feel hopeful that we shall be able to hold our past attainments 
and also advance in organization, enlistment, stewardship and 
trained, consecrated and courageous leadership. 

We ask the prayers of every church and their cooperation as we 
look inward to our own sincerity in the work, outward to the oppor- 
tunities and needs of the fields, and upward to God for power and 
guidance of the Holy Spirit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOTTIE LINK MARSHBANKS. 
— o 

Rev. Waldo Early delivered an address on "The Why and 
How of A Spiritual Awakening in All Our Organizations." The 
speaker pointed out three major factors — Prayer, Confession, 
and Consecration. 

Prayer was offered by B. P. Marshbanks and E. N. Gardner. 

After motion to adjourn, Gerald Motley offered the closing 
prayer. 



WEDNESDAY MORNING SESSION 

Songs: "Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing", "Standing 
on the Promises of God", were sung by the congregation, after 
which R. K. Benfield led in prayer. 

Report on Aged Ministers 

This report was v/ritten by J. C. Jones, and in his absence 
was read by E. N. Gardner. 

"Well done, thou good and faithful servant; enter thou into the 
joy of thy Lord" is the welcome home our Baptist ministers look 
forward to when their earthly labors are ended. Unfortunately for 
many of them, before this call comes their active years are past and 
their bodies, worn and feeble, no longer are able to respond to the 
calls of vigorous, growing churches. There often has been an in- 
terim between the time their earning capacity has ceased and the 
call home has come when many of our most faithful and loyal min- 
isters have lived in want, dependent upon their feeble efforts and an 
uncertam charity for their simplest needs. 

In an effort to aid these worn and disabled Soldiers of the Cross 

19 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



the Southern Baptist Convention in 1918 created the Relief and An- 
nuity B'oard to administer funds collected to care for aged and dis- 
abled ministers and their widows. The growth of this Board, both 
financially and in usefulness, speaks highly of the vision of the Bap- 
tist denomination and of the loving care it is giving its ministers as 
the shadows of Life's evening are beginning to fall about them and 
their steps are tired and feeble as they await the call home. 

The resources of $106,000 which the Board had at the end of its 
first year have grown until today they total over $4,500,000. The 
number of its beneficiaries has increased from less than one hundred 
the first year to more than two thousand at the end of the twen- 
tieth year. This does not take into account the great number of 
ministers and widows who have received these benefits in the past 
and who are now in the Glory Land. In relief grants and annuity 
benefits more than $3,370,000 have been paid. The earnings of the 
invested funds of the Board during this year were nearly $3,000,000, 
or practically 90 per cent of the benefits paid. 

The old Annuity Fund begun in 1919 and the Service Annuity 
have both been closed to new members. The reserves held by the 
Board are ample to meet the contractual provisions of the certificates 
that are in force. 

The Age Security Plan is being used by one hundred and thir- 
teen churches. Under this plan the basis of contributions is 3 per 
cent of the salary paid by the minister and 3 per cent by the church. 
While this plan is an improvement over the first two it is still re- 
stricted in its usefulness. 

The State Convention Ministers Retirement Plan more nearly 
meets all the requirements for providing retirement annuities for 
ministers and other church workers. Already ten State Conventions 
have taken specific action looking toward providing this insurance 
through a group plan. The State Convention Plan would make an 
appeal to all churches at the same time. It would overcome many of 
the weaknesses of the individual plan. It would be less expensive. 
It would remove the personal element, which has caused many of our 
best ministers to hesitate to have the matter presented to their 
churches. It would provide for the continuation of premium pay- 
ments in the case of ministers moving from one church to another. 

It seems clear to us that a plan can and ought to be adopted and 
included in every church budget that would provide for funds for 
providing retirement annuities for ministers. 

As a part of this report we would like to suggest that the 
adoption of a plan similar to the Convention Ministers Retirement 
Plan be strongly recommended to the State Convention by the Little 
River Association. This plan to provide that the amount of dues 
ministers would pay would be equivalent to 3 per cent of their sal- 
aries, the churches would be asked to pay a like sum, while from de- 

20 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



nominational sources there would be provided an additional 2 per 
cent of the salaries of the participating ministers. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH C. JONES 



Report of Special Committee 

This report was an amendment to the refort on Aged 
Ministers. Report adopted. 

Your committee to consider the resolution concerning the coop- 
eration of ministers and churches of the Little River Association with 
the Relief and Annuity Board of Southern Baptists, begs leave to 
submit the following report: 

We recommend, first, that the churches and pastors of the as- 
sociation enter into agreement with the Relief and Annuity Board in 
accepting its Age Security Plan, by which a pastor pays into the 
funds of the Board 3 per cent of his salary, and the church places in 
its budget a similar sum which it pays to the Board against the re- 
tirement of the pastor from the active ministry. 

We recommend, in the second place, that the Little River Asso- 
ciation go upon record as giving its endorsement to the Baptist 
State Convention to meet in Raleigh, November 15-17, of the State 
Retirement Plan, by which to these sums indicated above the Con- 
vention will set aside another 2 per cent, in order to aid in the build- 
ing up of larger reserves for ministers over the state of North Caro- 
lina. 

Respectfully submitted, [ 

MACK M. JERNIGAN, 
G. SCOTT TURNER 
S. A. RHYNE. 

— ^ — 

Report on Hospitals 

This report was written by W. E. Bond and adopted later 
on in the day. Mr. Smith Hagaman of the Baptist Hospital at 
Winston-Salem addressed the body. 

The Baptist Hospital was incorporated in 1922, and received its 
first patient May the 28, 1923. 

The Baptist Hospital at Winston-Salem as well as any others 
fostered by the Southern Baptist Convention was established for the 
purpose of providing hospital treatment for the sick of the entire 
state and of the territory covered by the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion, especially those who are not able to pay for hospital treatment. 
It is further felt by the Baptist denomination that we could not be 

21 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



true to Christ, whose representatives we are, if we do not do some- 
thing in a large way to relieve human suffering, especially those who 
are not able to pay for hospital treatment. 

The denomination has lived up to its obligations in this respect. 
On September the 1, 1938, over 41,000 patients had entered the hos- 
pital since it was established. An average of 346 are admitted each 
month now. 

The hospital at Winston-Salem is a well-equipped hospital and 
keeps a staff of competent surgeons, many of which are specialists 
and who can come to the hospital when called within a few minutes. 
The hospital also maintains a school for nurses. In this school many 
young women have been trained for their noble profession. 

The work of the hospital has not been confined to our denomina- 
tion alone. Of those treated there have been 13,522 Baptist, 5,576 
Methodist, 3,098 Moravian, 1,239 Presbyterian, 1,032 Christian, 826 
Episcopal, 413 Lutheran, 412 Jews, 207 Catholic, 410 miscellaneous, 
and 6,304 of no denomination. Thus it is seen that the ministry ot 
healing has reached God's people of all denominations as far as has 
been possible. 

This work has constantly grown until at the present time the 
hospital may be compelled to turn patients away because there are 
not sufficient facilities to care for them. The Superintendent states 
that they are not now able to take much more than one-half of the 
patients applying. With $200,000 the bed capacity can be increased 
to over 200, or about doi^bled. The economy effected by increasing 
the number of beds or patient capacity without increasing the over- 
head more than 15 per cent, as has been estimated, will tend to fur- 
ther reduce the present low cost per day for patients cared for in 
the hospital. It is hoped, and earnestly prayed that the Baptist de- 
nomination will not fail their Master in this noble undertaking. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER E. BOND. 



Report on Obituaries 

H. Y. Smith read the report, after which the congregation 
stood and G. Scott Turner offered prayer. 

Rev. Lee Sheppard of the Pullen Memorial Baptist Church 
of Raleigh addressed the body on " Making America Christian." 

Report on Orphanage 

Read by Haywood West, after which J. C. Hough of the 
Kennedy Home addressed the body. He in turn presented Pat 
Alderman, director of the Kennedy Home Choral Club. Mr. 



22 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Alderman, together with 26 girls and boys of the Kennedy Home, 
gave a sacred concert. 

The Baptist Orphanage with its efficient personnel is still car- 
rying out these words: "Train up a child in the way that he should 
go and when he is old he will not depart from it." These children 
taken into the institution are brought up under Christian environ- 
ment and when they are sent from ,the orphanage they are developed 
physically, mentally and spiritually to take their places of usefulness 
throughout the world. 

There are at present at the Mills and Kennedy Homes 590 child- 
ren for which the cost per month per child is $28.00. Also there are 
165 children being helped through Mothers Aid and kept in boarding 
homes which last year cost |4,122.50. The total number of children 
being cared for by the Baptist Orphanage is 755. 

The main support of the orphanage comes through the once a 
month contributions from the churches and Sunday Schools and the 
Thanksgiving offering which is looked forward to every year. The 
farms, printing department and special gifts are minor sources of 
revenue, but cannot be relied upon for any substantial support. 

The total assets of the Baptist Orphanage including Current 
Fund Assets, Loan Fund Assets, Endowment Fund Assets, and Plant 
Fund Assets as of January 1, 1938, were $1,207,434.86, and we as 
Baptists should be gratified to the extent that we have contributed 
materially toward this as well as making over 4000 children happy 
during their childhood since the foundation of the Baptist Orphan, 
age 53 years ago. Even with the good that we have done our hearts 
are saddened when we are told that several hundred worthy boys and 
girls are seeking admission into our institution, but are denied ad- 
mittance because there is no room for them. Perhaps this condition 
exists through our failure to do our best for the orphanage. 

We would that every church within the State Convention send 
in regularly every month a contribution to the orphanage regardless 
of the size and let every Baptist Church hold a service on Thanks- 
giving day and bring an offering as the Lord has blessed them for 
the children of our adoption who are looking to us for the tomforts 
of life. 

The churches in the Little River Baptist Association have this 
year contributed $168.60 to the Perry Morgan Memorial Library 
Fund at the Kennedy Home and it is urged that the churches in the 
Little River Baptist Association continue to raise funds another year 
for this -worthy cause. May we not forget the little ones who are 
needing our support because Christ said, "Suffer little children to 
come unto me and forbid them not, for of such is the Kingdom of Hea- 
ven. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. HAYWOOD WEST. 
23 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



An offering was reeceived from the congregation for the 
Kennedy Home and the United Dry Forces which amounted to 
about $25.00. This was turned over to the Moderator. 

The body adjourned for dinner after prayer by J. C. Hough. 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

Song: "Showers of Blessings" was sung. Dr. Trela D. Col- 
'ins,, President of the North Carolina Federal Council of Church- 
es, announced a meeting of that body for January 17, 1939 in 
Durham. 

Report on Temperance 

Written by G. M. Graham and read by Waldo Early. The 
report was discussed by J. M. Page of Raleigh. Adopted. 

Temperance and public morals are becoming- more vital issues 
for our section today than ever before. We no longer can view in- 
temperance and immorality indifferently. The character and life of 
our young- people are at stake, let alone the damaging influence on 
our older people, by the practices which society, in a large measure,, 
approves. The voices of our enemies have misled us, and we are more 
or less sanctioning many public evils today by our acquiescence in: 
them. We should pray for a positive attitude and a positive action 
in this hour when these evils are so perilously threatening us. 

The liquor traffic is coming nearer us. Within a short while we 
shall probably be called to vote on it in our county. To me it seems 
paradoxical that a Christian will vote to bring into Harnett or any 
other county legalized liquor, thereby making it easier for weak men 
and women to fall into its debauchery. 

Sunday baseball, Sunday motion pictures, and various other 
amusements are playing- their part in breaking down the morals of 
our people. Those who enter into all the Sunday amusements cannot 
have truly the experience of a "Lord's day" in their lives. We deplore 
this general desecration of the Sabbath, and we must especially call 
the attention of our young people to the grave dangers they face by 
not halting on Sunday, away from our resorts and places of amuse- 
ment, to give place for deep religious experience, which is basic in- 
good morals. 

Do we still have Christian courage? Let us take our stand 
against these public evils. May we as a great Baptist family assert 
in the face of the coming evil that we will not surrender our tem- 
perance and high Christian morality to these sins and wholesale de- 



24 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



bauchery of character. Christ helping us, we can take no other 
stand. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE M. GRAHAM. 
October 10th, 1938. 



Dr. John T. Wayland of Durham addressed the body on "The 
Why and How of A Revival in Our Social Order." 

G. Scott Turner made a final report on The State of the 
Churches in Little River Association. 

Report of Finance Committee 

This report was made by R. F. Hall, Clerk-Treasurer of Little 
River Association and C. W. Flowers and H. M. Thomas. Report 
adopted. 

TREASURER'S REPORT— OCTOBER 25, 1938 
LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 

Received Oct., 1937, for printing minutes, as indicated 

in table of minutes |108.43 

Balance brought forward, 1936 4.14 

TOTAL 1112.57 

Received October, 1937, for Missions: 

Broadway $ 53.75 

Cumberland Union 30.90 

Layton's Chapel 10.00 

Oak Grove 12.00 

Bethel 6.00 

TOTAL $112.65 

GRAND TOTAL $225.22 

Paid Out— 1937 

Record Publishing Company $ 65.55 

M. A. Huggins 58.90 

M. O. Alexander 53.75 

To Clerk * 25^00 

Postage and Delivery of Minutes 4.50 

GRAND TOTAL PAID OUT $207 70 

GRAND TOTAL RECEIVED $225 22 

GRAND TOTAL PAID OUT 207.70 

BALANCE ON HAND — OCTOBER, 1938 . $ 17.52 

25 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Report of Resolutions Committee 

Be it resolved: 

1. That this Association shall be given the opportunity of dis- 
cussing each of the nine points suggested by the Moderator in his 
message. 

2. That the Moderator's message shall be included in the min- 
utes of this association. 

3. That the deepest appreciation be expressed to the Baptist 
Grove Church for the cordial and generous hospitality shown us dur- 
ing this session of the Little River Association. 

S. A. RHYNE, 

MRS. TRUDY POWELL, 

MISS LILLIAN DRAUGHAN 



Committee on Time, Place and Preacher for next session of 
association reported as follows: 

Time: Tuesday & Wednesday after 4th Sunday in Oct. 1939. 
Place: Bethel Baptist Church near Manchester. 
Preacher: Waldo Early. Alternate: R. E, Atkins. 

R. K. Benfield 

John Gregory 

Mrs. Anna Rickman 



Report of Committee Concerning Ordination 

Read and adopted. 

RECOMMENDATION TO THE LITTLE RIVER ASSOCIATION 
CONCERNING ORDINATION TO THE GOSPEL MINISTRY 

We, the Little River Association in session at Baptist Grove 
Church, October 25, 26, 1938, representing twenty-five churches of 
our faith, believe that the time has come when all of our churches 
need to give close attention to the ordination of men for the gospel 
ministry. This is true because of the general rise of educational 
standards among the people of the country, the painful surfeit of or- 
dained ministers without church work, the frequently expressed wish 
of a church or some person wishing to be ordained that a gifted lay- 
man be set apart for the work of the ministry, and the close coopera- 
tion that exists among the independent church units of our denomi- 
nation, thus making any act of ordination not a matter of local con- 
cern only, but of general Baptist interest. We therefore recom- 
mend: 

First, that this association in session appoint a presbytery con- 

26 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



sisting of not less than five ministers, one the pastor of the candi- 
date, and four others elected year by year from the body, with the 
Moderator to sit ex officio with this presbytery, for the purpose of 
examining and passing on the qualifications and possibilities for 
pastoral work of the person whose ordination is sought. 

Second, That any man who has been licensed by a local church 
to preach shall exercise his calling wherever he may desire for a 
period of not less than two years before he shall be eligible for or- 
dination, unless some church calls him as pastor. 

Third, That the association encourage those who may feel 
called of God to be ministers to prepare themselves thoroughly to 
proclaim God's Word and serve as good ministers of Jesus Christ in 
meeting the ever-changing needs of our generation. 

B. P. MARSHBANKS, 

WALDO D. EARLY, 

E. NORFLEET GARDNER, Committee. 
__o 

On motion by Scott Turner that the clerk send minutes to 

the churches in proportion to the minute fund each church sent 

to the clerk, and that the clerk receive $25.00 for his services 

in getting out the minutes. 

A Petition 

We, the messengers of the Little River Baptist Association, 
which represents nearly seven thousand Baptists, and which is one of 
seventy district associations in the state of North Carolina, United 
States of America, in session October 26, 1938, do respectfully and 
earnestly petition the Rumanian government in behalf of our be- 
loved brethren and sisters of like faith in Rumania. Knowing that a 
fundamental tenet of our body includes the patriotic devotion of its 
m.embers to the interests of the state, while at the same time it insists 
on the right of every individual to worship God according to the dic- 
tates of his own conscience, we beg that the privilege of continuing 
to worship in the church buildings of your noble country, and to 
propagate their faith therein, be guaranteed to the Baptists of Ru- 
mania. 

Signatures for Association: 
LESLIE H. CAMPBELL, 

Pres. Campbell College, Buie's Creek, N. C, Moder. 
ator Little River Association. 
E. NORFLEET GARDNER, 

Pastor First Baptist Church, Dunn, N. C. Past 
Moderator Little River Association. 



27 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



The Sixty-Third Annual Session of the Little River Baptist 
Association adjourned to meet next year at the Bethel Baptist 
Church near Manchester on Tuesday and Wednesday after the 
4th Sunday in October, 1939. 

The congregation stood and sang: "Praise God From Whom 
All Blessings Flow" and D. H. Senter offered the closing prayer. 
LESLIE H. CAMPBELL, Moderator. 
R. F. HALL, Clerk-Treasurer. 
oOo 



28 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



REPORT ON OBITUARIES 


We are told in the Word, ''Precious in the sight of the 


Lord is the death of his saints." This wonderful truth is a 


challenge to us to cherish their memory and emulate their ex- 


ample. 


1 


The distractions, hurry 


and bustle of our times cause us 1 


too soon to forget the precious memories of our departed loved | 


ones. 


I 


Record as reported in the church letters follows: 1 


ANGIER— 


CHALYBEATE SPRINGS— 


Mr. William Morgan 


Mr. G. R. Wells, Deacon 


Mrs. J. W. Williford 


Mrs. S. P. Smith 


Mrs. Burnett Hockaday 


Mr. Atlas Johnson 


ANTIOCH— 

Mr. W. J. Brown, Deacon 


Mr, E. A. Johnson 
Mr. Eddie B»radley 


Mrs. Mattie Brown 


COATS— 


Miss Minnie Nordan 


Mr. A. F. Grimes 


Mr. Clyde Lynch 


Mrs. P. F. Pope 


Mr. H. B. Buchanan 
Mrs. Duncan McLean 
Mrs. Cora B. Thomas 
Mrs. Etta B. Wallace 


CUMBERLAND UNION— 
Mr. Hardee 


DUNN— 


Miss Alice Matthews 


Mrs. E. G. Barnes 


BAPTIST GROVE— 

Mr. George Cotton 


Mr. Moscoe Butler, Jr. 
Mrs. Mary Byrd 
Mrs. Meda Denning 


BUIE'S CREEK— 


Mrs. Victoria Floyd 


Mr. Emory Williams 


Dr. Charles Highsmith 


Miss Jimmie Baker 


Miss Othella Jones 


Mr. James Tarte 


Mrs. W. B. Warren 


Mr. Nash V. Haire 




Mr. Ben Upchurch 




Mr. N. W. Gregory 




Mrs. Leslie Matthews 









29 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 





la 




OBITUARY 


ERWIN— 


NEILL'S CREEK— 


Mr. L. D. Hall 


Mr. D. D. Johnson, Deacon 


Mr. C. C. Hall 


Mr. J. L. Wilborn, Deacon 


Mr. H. C. Harris 


Mrs. Lula Matthews 


Mrs. M. A. Cameron 


Mrs. Sylval A. Jones 


Mrs. Ada Tew 
Mrs. Thomas Ralph 


OAK GROVE— 

Mrs. Nancy E. Matthews 


FRIENDSHIP— 
Mr J B AllpTi 


PINEY GROVE— 


Mrs. W. W. Allen 


Mrs. Laura Wood 
Mr. D. S. Cook 


HOLLY SPRINGS— 


Mr. Walter Austin 


Mr. L. E. Byrd 


Mr. S. J. Weathers 


Mrs. Evelyne McNeill 


Mrs. Lenna Dennis 


MACEDONIA— 


RAWLS— 


Mrs. Julia Baker 


Mrs. W. C. Utley 




LAYTON'S CHAPEL— 




Mrs. Cora Matthews 




Mrs. Leonia Holder 


Respectfully submitted, 1 




H. Y. SMITH. 




Isl 



30 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Annual Meeting of the 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Little River Association 

Harmony Baptist Church, Thursday, September 8, 1938 

The meeting was called to order by the Superintendent, Mrs. 
E. N. Gardner. 

Theme: "The Trumpet Sounds — We Answer". 

Hymn: "O Worship The King". 

Watchword was repeated in unison. "Give unto the Lord the 
Glory due unto His name; bring an offering and come into His 
courts." — Psalm 96, 8. 

Responsive reading — Psalm 96,1-10, Psalm 98, led by Mrs. 
W. A. Weston, Lillington W. M. S. 

Mrs. Matthews of the Harmony W. M. S. graciously wel- 
comed us to which Mrs. W. B. Currin of the Antioch W. M. S. 
responded. 

Organization — The order of business according to the pro- 
gram was adopted. Committees were appointed: 

Nomination — Mesdames Joel Layton, S. D. Whittenton, W. 
E. Nichols, W. B. Currin. 

Time and Place — Miss Mattie Bain, Mesdames I. L. Howell, 
C. K. Smith. 

Resolutions— Mesdames Waldo Early, Thos. G. Brady, W. A. 
Weston. 

"Answering the Trumpet Call"- — ^^Report of officers. 

I Mission Study — Mrs. Paul Bradley. In order to see 
whether we were approved workers or workers to be ashamed, 
an examination was made as to the (1) Number of Mission 
Study classes held in the year. (2) Number of members attend- 
ing. (3) Number reading the book. 

31 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Suggestions as to how to hold a class were made. A number 
of books were mentioned for a worth while study, both from a 
literary standpoint as well as their interest in missions. 

II Personal Service — Chairman, Mrs. Allen Shaw, reported 
that 36 societies engaged in organized personal service as fol- 
lows: 



Mission Sunday School 

Cottage Prayer Meeting 

Work for sick 

Helping needy families 

Work for under-privileged- 

Children 

Work for Negroes 

Work for prisoners 

Vacation Bible School 

Distributing articles such as 

Bibles 

Garments 

Good Literature 

Flowers 

Basketss and trays 



W.M.S. 


Y.W.A. 


G.A. 


R.A. 


3 


1 






2 








10 


5 


5 


4 


11 


4 




2| 


3 








3 


1 


1 




2 








9 


3 


4 


3 


2 








9 


3 


2 




7 


3 


3 


3 


10 


4 


5 


1 


11 


3 


5 


3 



Visits (for church or S. S.) sick, aged, shut-ins, 

strangers 

Holding services for Negroes 
Holding services for prisoners 

At institutions 

Sharing games and books. 

with less fortunate 



5 


3 


4 


1 


1 






1 


1 








4 


2 


2 


1 



An explanation of organized personal service work and how 
it is carried on effectively was made by the chairman. Since the 
aim is soul-winning, the reports should show only organized per- 
sonal service work. 

Ill Margaret Fund— Mrs. W. E. Nichols. To help in this 
work, the book ''Following in His Train" was recommended. Two 
collections for the fund will be taken this year — one for the 
maintenance of the Training School and the Jubilee Gift is for 

32 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



rebuilding the school. Kazue Murata, a Margaret Fund student, 
could not be present so Mrs. Harris told us of the splendid work 
she was doing trying to fit herself to go back to her people as 
a Christian worker. 

Roll Call of the Societies: 

Angier, Antioch, Broadway, Buie's Creek, Chalybeate, 
Coats, Dunn, Erwin, Friendship, Harmony, Holly Springs, Lil- 
lington, Neills Creek, Piney Grove, Swan's Station. All respond- 
ed in person with 173 delegates and $19.10 for the associational 
progress fund. Rawls sent a report but Oak Grove failed to 
respond. 

"Hallowed Be Thy Name" was the theme of the Superin- 
tendent's view of our weaknesses and failures as well as our 
growth, progress and accomplishments. The statistical report 
showed that 227 letters and postals were sent; 134 miles were 
travelled; 3 meetings were held; with $6.78 as expenses less $1.00 
paid by the Antioch Juniors. — $5.78. 

Special music by the Holly Springs W. M. S. 

"The Trumpet Calls to Knowledge'' — ^A demonstration of 
the make-up and special interests of our mission papers. This 
inflowing stream of material, if wisely used, will help to keep 
alive and growing our great interest in missions. By all means 
our societies should endeavor to have for all the organizations 
this knowledge which can best be secured from our magazines. 
This demonstration was made by the members of Friendship W. 
M. S. and Y. W. A. 

"The Trumpet Calls To Training" — The Young People's Re- 
port was made by the Leader, Mrs. R. K. Benfield. The work of 
the year had featured a G. A. and R. A. Rally reported by Mary 
Gunter. A Y. W. A. Golden Reception at Buie's Creek had its 
golden memories, ideas, giggles and goodies according to Amelia 
Marzadro. One gold certificate had been redeemed by the Angier 
Sunbeams. The great need of the Young People's organizations 
is the fostering spirit of the mother W. M. S. The meaning of 
fostering was explained by Mrs. A. L. Overby. Some plans — con- 
centration on mission study, church night, R. A. Focus Week, en- 
larged subscription lists to World's Comrades and The Window, 

33 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



and an endeavoring to gain the increased interest of the young 
people. Expense of Y. P's. Leader, $3.00. 

Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks, who was to speak on Campbell Col- 
lege — Our Own — couldn't be present so Prof. Campbell spoke on 
Campbell College and its service to the community. Suggestions 
as to how this could be improved were sought. Mrs. Joel Layton 
spoke of its relation to Little River Association while Mrs. Chas. 
Howard showed us how the spiritual development and denomina- 
tional training was the one great goal of Campbell College. 

Adjourned with prayer by Mrs. Chas. Howard. 

EVENING SESSION 

Singing. Devotional was led by Mrs. Waldo Early whose 
theme was Praising the Lord. 

"The Trumpet Sounds on the Other Side."— Mrs. R. E. Stan- 
cil conducted a memorial service for: 

Mrs. Blake Warren, Dunn 
Mrs. Meta Denning, Dunn 
Mrs. P. F. Pope, Coats. 
Report of Committees: 

Time and Place — Thursday after 1st Sunday in September, 
Holly Springs, accepted. 

Resolutions — Be it resolved that we, the W. M. U. of the Lit- 
tle River Association express our heart-felt appreciation to Mrs. 
Gardner for her untiring efforts and constant vigil over the 
societies of this association. Such gracious service as rendered 
by her will continue to bring blessings to each who has been 
privileged to work with her. 

2nd. That we acknowledgs to the society of Harmony church 
our appreciation for their hospitality to us this day. 

3rd. That we do express to Mrs. Harris our joy at her pres- 
ence and deep gratitude for her message. 

4th. That we as Christian women, aware of a distraught and 
needy world here and abroad, shall dedicate our lives more fully 
to God's work. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Mrs. Waldo Early 
Mrs. W. A. Weston 
Mrs. Thos. G. Brady. 
34 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



dominating Committee reports: 

Superintendent, Mrs. R. K. Benfield, Angier. 
Associate Supt., Mrs S. D. Whittenton, Dunn. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. L. Overby, Angier. 
Mission Study Chairman, Mrs. R. F. Hall, Lillington. 
Personal Service Chairman, Mrs. B. P. Marshbanks. 

Buie's Creek. 

Stewardship Chairman, Mrs. D. D. Overby, Angier. 
Margaret Fund Chairman, Mrs. D. H. Senter, Chalybeate. 
Training School Chairman, Mrs. C. K. Smith, Chalybeate. 
Young People's Leader, Mrs. Chas. Howard, Buie's Creek. 
On motion the report was adopted. 

A motion was made by Mrs. Joel Layton, that we give a 
rising vote of thanks to Mrs. Gardner, our retiring superinten- 
dent, for the fine services rendered to the association. 

Prayer for the incoming officers was made by Mrs. Young. 

Announcements by Mrs. Gardner. 

"The Trumpet Calls to Service." — The Training School 
Chairman made her report. She called on all this Jubilee year to 
make a Jubilee Gift to be used in rebuilding a larger training 
school. A roll call of Training School girls brought response 
from Miss Mattie Bain, Mesdames R. K. Benfield, W. A. Weston, 
and C. K. Smith. A special prayer was made for Miss Littlejohn 
by Zula Rogers. 

"The Trumpet Call for Continuance." — Mrs. D. D. Overby, 
the Stewardship Chairman, was not able to be present. 

A truly inspirational address by Mrs. Harris urged us to 
continue the good work begun fifty years ago. 

The Jubilee Gifts were brought into the Golden Treasury. 
Silent prayer of rededication followed by prayer of adjourn- 
ment by Mr. Gardner. 

Supt., MRS. E. N. GARDNER. 
Sec, MRS. V.L.STEPHENS. 



35 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



China relief will be white gift. 

Espinozos remembered at Christmas. 
Statistical Report. 

Report from every society. 

Concentrate on 100 thousand club. 

Take up, if desired, Miss Macy's project, not asked. ^ 

Aims for Jubilee Year: 

10 % increase in membership. 
10 % increase in gifts. 

Names of new places for organization of new societies look- 
ed into. 

Jubilee Plans: > 

(1) Have definite plans especially in organization. 

(2) Either complete your own or make new ones. 

(3) New Training School. 

(4) Work among the Negroes. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Secretary, Mrs. Stephens. 



-oOo- 



36 



LITTLE RIVER BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



Meeting of the 
PROMOTIONAL-EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Lillington Baptist Church, Nov. 20, 1938. 

W. A. Weston led in a devotional, after which the Modera- 
tor, L. H. Campbell, stated the object of the meeting, e.g. To 
make plans for the year 1939. 

E. N. Gardner made a brief report of the annual meeting 
of the Baptist State Convention. 

R. F. Hall reported on the recent Stewardship Revival held 
in the Little River Association. 

The Moderator appointed the following committees: 
Associational Presbytery: 

E. N. Gardner, C. B. Howard, Waldo Early, R. F. Hall. 

Committee on Ways and Means for a Closer Fellowship Between 
the Association and Campbell College: 

B. P. Marshbanks, R. L. Poplin, L. H. Campbell and all the 

Pastors in the Association. 

Committee on Co-ordination and Simplification of the Associa- 
tional Meetings: 

C. B. Howard, G. Scott Turner, R. K. Benfield, G. G. Page, 

Waldo Early, Mrs. R. K. Benfield. 

19 of the 25 churches in the association were represented 
at this meeting. 

The goals of the churches for 1939 were discussed by C. B. 
Howard. He was asked to revise the chart and prepare it for pub- 
lication in the minutes. 

The meeting adjourned. 

L. H. CAMPBELL, Moderator. 

R. F. HALL, Clerk-Treasurer. 



37 



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